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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Heavenly

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Rock - Released April 6, 2009 | Heavenly

Four years after retreating to the English countryside to record 2005's Some Cities, Doves return to a more urban state of mind with Kingdom of Rust. "My god," Jimi Goodwin sings during the title track, "it takes an ocean of trust in the kingdom of rust." Guitars chime throughout the chorus, where Goodwin's baritone searches of a lost love amidst a town's landscape. A string section makes an appearance toward the song's conclusion, bringing with it the same sweeping, Brit-pop uplift that fueled the band's debut album. Doves are still indebted to that scene -- the same one that spawned dozens of guitar-fueled, new-millennial rock bands -- but their songs have become broader in scope, often reaching an elated, emotional peak before spending a good amount of time on that emotion's melancholic comedown. As the album title suggests, Kingdom of Rust gives time to both sides of the band's personality, from the sweeping, cathedral-esque anthems ("The Outsiders," "Winter Hill") to dark, tarnished brooders ("Jetstream") that help level the spectrum. Songs like "10:03" and "Birds Flew Backwards" strike a balance between those two camps, with the latter track featuring a stately cello and some dazzling moments of atmospheric, reverb-heavy harmonies. This is still a bright record, though, one that finds catharsis in the gloomier songs and strength in the tracks that resemble Lost Souls' anthems. © Andrew Leahey /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Heavenly

Four years after retreating to the English countryside to record 2005's Some Cities, Doves return to a more urban state of mind with Kingdom of Rust. "My god," Jimi Goodwin sings during the title track, "it takes an ocean of trust in the kingdom of rust." Guitars chime throughout the chorus, where Goodwin's baritone searches of a lost love amidst a town's landscape. A string section makes an appearance toward the song's conclusion, bringing with it the same sweeping, Brit-pop uplift that fueled the band's debut album. Doves are still indebted to that scene -- the same one that spawned dozens of guitar-fueled, new-millennial rock bands -- but their songs have become broader in scope, often reaching an elated, emotional peak before spending a good amount of time on that emotion's melancholic comedown. As the album title suggests, Kingdom of Rust gives time to both sides of the band's personality, from the sweeping, cathedral-esque anthems ("The Outsiders," "Winter Hill") to dark, tarnished brooders ("Jetstream") that help level the spectrum. Songs like "10:03" and "Birds Flew Backwards" strike a balance between those two camps, with the latter track featuring a stately cello and some dazzling moments of atmospheric, reverb-heavy harmonies. This is still a bright record, though, one that finds catharsis in the gloomier songs and strength in the tracks that resemble Lost Souls' anthems. © Andrew Leahey /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 6, 2009 | Heavenly

Booklet
Four years after retreating to the English countryside to record 2005's Some Cities, Doves return to a more urban state of mind with Kingdom of Rust. "My god," Jimi Goodwin sings during the title track, "it takes an ocean of trust in the kingdom of rust." Guitars chime throughout the chorus, where Goodwin's baritone searches of a lost love amidst a town's landscape. A string section makes an appearance toward the song's conclusion, bringing with it the same sweeping, Brit-pop uplift that fueled the band's debut album. Doves are still indebted to that scene -- the same one that spawned dozens of guitar-fueled, new-millennial rock bands -- but their songs have become broader in scope, often reaching an elated, emotional peak before spending a good amount of time on that emotion's melancholic comedown. As the album title suggests, Kingdom of Rust gives time to both sides of the band's personality, from the sweeping, cathedral-esque anthems ("The Outsiders," "Winter Hill") to dark, tarnished brooders ("Jetstream") that help level the spectrum. Songs like "10:03" and "Birds Flew Backwards" strike a balance between those two camps, with the latter track featuring a stately cello and some dazzling moments of atmospheric, reverb-heavy harmonies. This is still a bright record, though, one that finds catharsis in the gloomier songs and strength in the tracks that resemble Lost Souls' anthems. © Andrew Leahey /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 6, 2009 | Heavenly

Booklet
Four years after retreating to the English countryside to record 2005's Some Cities, Doves return to a more urban state of mind with Kingdom of Rust. "My god," Jimi Goodwin sings during the title track, "it takes an ocean of trust in the kingdom of rust." Guitars chime throughout the chorus, where Goodwin's baritone searches of a lost love amidst a town's landscape. A string section makes an appearance toward the song's conclusion, bringing with it the same sweeping, Brit-pop uplift that fueled the band's debut album. Doves are still indebted to that scene -- the same one that spawned dozens of guitar-fueled, new-millennial rock bands -- but their songs have become broader in scope, often reaching an elated, emotional peak before spending a good amount of time on that emotion's melancholic comedown. As the album title suggests, Kingdom of Rust gives time to both sides of the band's personality, from the sweeping, cathedral-esque anthems ("The Outsiders," "Winter Hill") to dark, tarnished brooders ("Jetstream") that help level the spectrum. Songs like "10:03" and "Birds Flew Backwards" strike a balance between those two camps, with the latter track featuring a stately cello and some dazzling moments of atmospheric, reverb-heavy harmonies. This is still a bright record, though, one that finds catharsis in the gloomier songs and strength in the tracks that resemble Lost Souls' anthems. © Andrew Leahey /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Heavenly

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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Heavenly

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Pop - Released April 6, 2009 | Heavenly

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Rock - Released July 17, 2009 | Heavenly

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Rock - Released July 17, 2009 | Heavenly

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Rock - Released January 1, 2008 | Heavenly

Released as a promotional vehicle for Lost Souls by Heavenly in a run of only 1,250 copies, Lost Sides collects 12 songs that didn't make it onto Doves' debut album. All of the songs on the collection would see release across the various singles extracted from Lost Souls. Unlike many a Brit-pop B-side collection, Lost Sides doesn't really work that well as a cohesive whole. Some of the songs are variations on album cuts, others kind of meander in stifled or dated grooves, and two or three tracks are obvious throwaways. But enough charm peaks out of the corners to elevate a number of the songs and make Lost Sides or the singles worthwhile. The bombastic anthemic rock of "Darker" sees Doves at their most aggressive, experimenting with vibes reminiscent of Talk Talk. These vibes continue on "Meet Me at the Pier," as edgy guitar jabs contrast most pleasantly with Jimi Goodwin's sweet humming. "Valley" and "Your Shadow Lay Across My Life" both would have been fine fits on Lost Souls, as both songs feature the band's trademark swirling bombast and strong melodies. Perhaps best of all, and not really indicative of the band's usual sonic territory, is "Acoustic No. 1," which features dynamic chugging acoustic guitars that simply and delightfully embed themselves into one's brain for the remainder of the day. Lost Sides certainly isn't essential listening for casual fans, and even hardcore fans won't be that impressed, since nothing to be found here represents the band at the top of its game. But the collection is pleasant enough while it lasts. © Tim DiGravina /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Heavenly

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Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Heavenly

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Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Heavenly

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Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Heavenly

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Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | Heavenly

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Rock - Released January 1, 2005 | Heavenly

For those who adored the lush textures of Doves' second album, The Last Broadcast, the seriousness of Some Cities might be a bit jarring. The ambitious indie rock trio is much more direct and exact this time out, and it's a great shift in style. In contrast to this opus, optimism ruled on The Last Broadcast, which soared with a majestic celestial setting of bright choruses, vibrant electronic beats, and gushing guitar riffs. Some Cities percolates with more of a hopeful but grounded spirit, an English spirit. The band's native Manchester comes into view. Shades of ash and cinder surround Doves' guitar flow, but without melancholy. The album's title track captures that with vocalist/guitarist Jimi Goodwin's earnest plea, "Some cities crush/Some cities heal/Some cities laugh/While other cities steal/Can't I make you see?" Pianos and drums run parallel on "Black and White Town" and match the adrenaline and motion of "There Goes the Fear." Only two songs in, the band's soft dreamy focus turns into complex emotion, and it's beautifully done. Both the sweeping acoustic guitars of "Someday Soon" and the symphonic lament "The Storm" continue the cinematic slow burn of Some Cities, reflecting upon a cloudy countryside. Escaping the dreariness of Manchester is what fueled Doves to start a band in the first place. Some Cities isn't a Mancunian downer. It's very real and Doves' best yet. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2005 | Heavenly

4 stars out of 5 - "[T]his is smart, limber country-rock craft, with a dash of confessional folk intimacy and a decent helping of the blues." © TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2005 | Heavenly

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Rock - Released January 1, 2005 | Heavenly