Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

From
CD€2.49

Pop/Rock - Released February 10, 2010 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

From
CD€14.49

Film Soundtracks - Released May 16, 2006 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

From
CD€14.49

Electronic - Released January 3, 2006 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

From
CD€14.49

Pop/Rock - Released July 26, 2005 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

You'd think that a rom-com soundtrack that begins with Christopher Plummer reciting Yeats' poem "Brown Penny" would be different than your average collection of sweet, sentimental film music. And you'd be right: the soundtrack to Must Love Dogs is certainly quirky, but perhaps not in the ways the people behind it intended. The album veers between unique choices like the opening track and hyper-traditional ones like Linda Ronstadt's "When Will I Be Loved?" and the quintessential romantic comedy soundtrack song, Natalie Cole's "This Will Be (An Everlasting Love)," which has been in so many movies of this kind that it feels like it's on loan. In fact, later on Must Love Dogs actually does borrow from one of the all-time great romantic scores, "Prelude and Lara's Theme" from Dr. Zhivago. The soundtrack also has a twangy angle, with Ronstadt's hit, Sheryl Crow's cover of "The First Cut Is the Deepest," and tracks from country-pop singers as well as artists who flirt with country, such as Stephanie Bentley and Susan Haynes. Susie Suh's gorgeous "Shell" and Rodney Crowell's sweetly traditional "What Kind of Love" are the highlights in this area, although Rilo Kiley's "I Never" and Ryan Adams & the Cardinals' "Dance All Night" are on surprisingly equal footing with these songs while adding a faint whiff of hipness (much like John Cusack's presence in the film). By spanning songs like these, as well as Eddie Holman's flawless "Hey There Lonely Girl" and a goofy cast singalong of the Partridge Family theme "Come on Get Happy," Must Love Dogs certainly has personality -- in fact, it has multiple personalities. © Heather Phares /TiVo
From
CD€14.49

Pop/Rock - Released November 16, 2004 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

Despite being huge stars in their native Japan and releasing three brilliant albums in the U.S., Puffy AmiYumi have never made much of a splash with record buyers. The band may finally change that with the release of Hi Hi Puffy AmiYumi Music from the Series. After performing the theme for the Cartoon Network show Teen Titans, Puffy and the network decided to create their own animated series revolving around the band. The boisterously delicious theme ("Hi Hi") kicks off this disc of singles, album tracks, and rarities that is a necessity for already devoted Puffy fans and may just win them some widespread acclaim. The tracks are taken from the group's two American releases with four songs ("Boogie Woogie No. 5," "Love So Pure," "December," and "Into the Beach") coming from 2001's Spike and one ("Planet Tokyo") from 2003's Nice, their first single (1996's "True Asia"), the Scooby Doo 2 soundtrack ("Friends Forever"), their 1997 album SoloSolo ("V-A-C-A-T-I-O-N"), singles ("That's the Way It Is"), and rare tracks ("Forever," "Sunrise" and a rollicking cover of Jellyfish's "Joining a Fan Club"). Every song collected here is first-rate sunburst pop that manages to pull off the rare trick of being cute without being cutesy. The duo has so much good cheer, energy, and spunk that any charges of preciousness leveled at them can just be laughed away. It also helps that the two men responsible for crafting their sound, Tamio Okuda from the legendary Japanese pop band Unicorn and Andy Sturmer of the legendary American pop band Jellyfish, fully understand Puffy's appeal and craft perfect pop songs for them, delving into punk, new wave, girl group sounds, and even rockabilly and giving everything a bubbly J-pop twist. Hi Hi Puffy AmiYumi is a great introduction to the group. It doesn't provide the most rounded picture of the group -- look to 2003's Illustrated History for that -- but it does round up a batch of their most glittering and poptastic tunes, and is sure to be a hit with the same people who would be drawn to the cartoon. © Tim Sendra /TiVo

Pop - Released September 21, 2004 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

Download not available
From
CD€14.49

Film Soundtracks - Released August 10, 2004 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CD€14.49

Pop - Released April 13, 2004 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

From
CD€14.49

Film Soundtracks - Released November 21, 2003 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

From
CD€14.49

Pop - Released September 15, 2003 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

From
CD€14.49

R&B - Released July 26, 2002 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

Pop/Rock - Released July 15, 2002 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

Download not available
From
CD€14.49

Pop/Rock - Released February 24, 2003 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

From
CD€14.49

Film Soundtracks - Released October 22, 2001 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

From
CD€14.49

Classical - Released February 16, 2001 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

From
CD€14.49

Electronic - Released April 18, 2000 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

From
CD€14.49

Pop/Rock - Released November 22, 1999 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

From
CD€14.49

Pop/Rock - Released August 25, 1998 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

First Love, Last Rites is one of the more interesting motion picture soundtracks to come along in recent times. All of the songs were written and performed by Shudder to Think, but the catch is that they have a host of different alternative rock stars pitching in on vocals. All of the songs have a strong retro feel, since the music is originating from an oldies radio station throughout the movie. The Shudder boys show the range of their talents as they back up such alternative favorites as the late Jeff Buckley ("I Want Someone Badly"), Billy Corgan ("When I Was Born, I Was Bored"), Liz Phair ("Erecting a Movie Star"), and others. Shudder to Think pitches in six compositions that they perform entirely themselves (including vocals), the best of the bunch being the country twang of "Lonesome Dove" and "Diamonds, Sparks & All," which contains a very strong high-school-prom sound. Other highlights include a pair of tracks featuring two rock legends (Cheap Trick's Robin Zander on "Automatic Soup" and X's John Doe on "Speed of Love"), which help round out a great and unpredictable collection of "oldies." © Greg Prato /TiVo
From
CD€14.49

Electronic - Released August 11, 1998 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax