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Jazz - Released April 19, 2019 | Dreyfus Jazz

CD€7.99

Jazz - Released April 19, 2019 | Dreyfus Jazz

CD€7.99

Jazz - Released April 19, 2019 | Dreyfus Jazz

CD€7.99

Jazz - Released April 19, 2019 | Dreyfus Jazz

CD€7.99

Jazz - Released April 19, 2019 | Dreyfus Jazz

CD€7.99

Jazz - Released April 19, 2019 | Dreyfus Jazz

CD€7.99

Jazz - Released April 19, 2019 | Dreyfus Jazz

CD€7.99

Jazz - Released April 19, 2019 | Dreyfus Jazz

CD€7.99

Jazz - Released April 19, 2019 | Dreyfus Jazz

CD€7.99

Jazz - Released April 19, 2019 | Dreyfus Jazz

CD€7.99

Jazz - Released April 19, 2019 | Dreyfus Jazz

CD€7.99

Jazz - Released April 19, 2019 | Dreyfus Jazz

CD€7.99

Jazz - Released April 19, 2019 | Dreyfus Jazz

CD€7.99

Vocal Jazz - Released April 19, 2019 | Dreyfus Jazz

CD€13.49

Jazz - Released April 8, 2013 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Jazz - Released February 18, 2013 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Jazz - Released January 28, 2013 | Dreyfus Jazz

In this final recording with pianist Michel Petrucciani, saxophonist Grossman's usually more extroverted tendencies are willingly sublimated in order to play more romantically inclined mainstream jazz. Many of the tunes are ballads, embellished by Petrucciani's languid or forceful pianistics, while solid bassist Andy McKee and drummer Joe Farnsworth keep the flickering flame alive with their steadying rhythms. Of course the fire has to be stoked on occasion, and Grossman really digs in on the Sonny Rollins evergreen "Why Dont I?" It's perfectly played, a flawless uptempo swinger with head nodding, bluesy elements. Contrasting easy swing with double timed tenor on "Don't Blame Me" shows Grossman as riled up as he gets on this date. There's a samba take of "You Go To My Head" with Petrucciani's solo sporting 16th note flurries, and a moody, pensive waltz version of McKee's "Inner Circle" similar to "You Go To My Head." Two tunes go from ballad to swing and back, Grossman's "Song For My Mother" with the pianist quite animated in the bridge, and Petrucciani's "Parisian Welcome" brought in exclusively for this session, with Grossman the torch burner. The others are straight ballads including classic takes of "Body & Soul" and "Theme For Ernie," the lugubrious interpretation with a highly restrained Petrucciani on "Ebb Tide," and the sax-piano only rendition of "In A Sentimental Mood" as the CD's closer. Fans of Grossman should not wince at this apparent taming of the shrew. In fact, Grossman's pungent tone, never smeary or over pronounced, retains its rich, expressive listenability and tunefulness. It's a beautifully understated recording that is easily recommended, especially for those just discovering veteran Grossman. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 28, 2013 | Dreyfus Jazz

CD€14.99

Jazz - Released January 28, 2013 | Dreyfus Jazz

The Gypsy swing music of Django Reinhardt and Stéphane Grappelli of the 1930s has been kept alive by various European jazz musicians in the decades since Reinhardt's death in 1953 and Grappelli's in 1996. For the most part, the young guitarist Rocky Gresset continues Reinhardt's approach in his debut effort as a leader, utilizing a quartet with violinist Costel Nitescu and rhythm guitarist Matheu Chatelain, with bassist Jeremie Arranger taking over on two tracks. Gresset doesn't really break new ground in his treatments of standards like “Time on My Hands," “Just One of Those Things," and “Blue Skies." One of Reinhardt's songs, “Webster," is an obscurity dating from the guitarist's post-World War II years; Gresset and Nitescu offer impressive solos. While most of the music is Gypsy swing, Gresset switches to electric guitar for an impressive rendering of Wes Montgomery's “Jingles," which adds some Gypsy elements into the driving bop vehicle. He also plays electric guitar in an upbeat swinging setting of “Here's That Rainy Day" and the late Michel Petrucciani's upbeat Latin-flavored gem “Looking Up." This is an impressive beginning for Rocky Gresset. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 28, 2013 | Dreyfus Jazz

Roy Haynes' 2000 trio outing with Danilo Perez and John Patitucci had a tribute theme at its core. So too does this all-star quintet outing for Dreyfus. Here the subject at hand is Charlie Parker, with whom Haynes played for several years beginning in the late 1940s. Joining the 75-year-old Haynes for this tribute are bassist Dave Holland, altoist Kenny Garrett, trumpeter Roy Hargrove, and pianist David Kikoski. Having spent over ten years performing and recording with Haynes, Kikoski is especially in tune with the leader's every move. Some tracks are fairly typical Bird fare: "Moose the Mooche," "Yardbird Suite," "Diverse" (aka "Segment"), "April in Paris." Others, however, are off the beaten track: Billy Reid's "The Gypsy," Gerry Mulligan's "Rocker," Cole Porter's "My Heart Belongs to Daddy." In addition to the often fiery playing, there are a number of unexpected arranging twists. Haynes' take on "Ah Leu Cha" is an intriguing hybrid of the Charlie Parker and Miles Davis versions -- played fairly slow and with a straight repeat on the A section (Parker), but using "Scrapple From the Apple" changes rather than rhythm changes for the solos (Davis). Haynes also lengthens the form of "Now's the Time," Parker's anthemic yet simple blues, giving it a vamp-based flavor that recalls Eddie Harris' "Freedom Jazz Dance." The Cole Porter tune, similarly, becomes an occasion for modal stretching. There's also a blistering exchange between Hargrove and Garrett toward the end of "What Is This Thing Called Love" -- the album's big payoff. Despite these and other subtle touches, Birds of a Feather doesn't quite have the creative spark of Haynes' previous album. That was a working band; this comes across as a casual blowing date, albeit an illustrious and sometimes surprising one. © David R. Adler /TiVo