Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Musical Theatre - Released January 1, 1959 | Craft Recordings

Hi-Res
CD€14.99

Musical Theatre - Released January 1, 1959 | Craft Recordings

HI-RES€19.49
CD€13.99

Folk - Released October 1, 1960 | Craft Recordings

Hi-Res
HI-RES€19.49
CD€13.99

Folk - Released October 1, 1960 | Craft Recordings

Hi-Res
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1961 | Craft Recordings

Hi-Res
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1961 | Craft Recordings

Hi-Res
CD€13.99

Blues - Released January 1, 1965 | Craft Recordings

Tracy Nelson's debut album was very much in the traditional acoustic folk-blues style, without any of the rock influence that would enter her work when she joined Mother Earth. Vocally, Nelson (who also plays guitar and piano on the disc) took inspiration from early female blues singers Ma Rainey and Bessie Smith (both of whose songs are covered on the album), also interpreting some familiar early blues standards like "Candy Man" and "Baby Please Don't Go." Nelson's singing is already mature at this point, and the record isn't as dry as many other traditional folk albums from the 1960s, since she uses other musicians on guitar, piano, and harmonica to fill out the sound, harmonica player Charlie Musselwhite being the most notable of these. Her version of "House of the Rising Sun" is pretty interesting, since it uses a melody totally different from the one played by the Animals and numerous folk musicians of the era. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Blues - Released January 1, 1967 | Craft Recordings

Hi-Res
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Blues - Released January 1, 1967 | Craft Recordings

Hi-Res
CD€14.99

Blues - Released January 1, 1967 | Craft Recordings

Albert King recorded a lot in the early '60s, including some classic sides, but they never quite hit the mark. They never gained a large audience, nor did they really capture the ferocity of his single-string leads. Then he signed with Stax in 1966 and recorded a number of sessions with the house band, Booker T. & the MG's, and everything just clicked. The MG's gave King supple Southern support, providing an excellent contrast to his tightly wound lead guitar, allowing to him to unleash a torrent of blistering guitar runs that were profoundly influential, not just in blues, but in rock & roll (witness Eric Clapton's unabashed copping of King throughout Cream's Disraeli Gears). Initially, these sessions were just released as singles, but they were soon compiled as King's Stax debut, Born Under a Bad Sign. Certainly, the concentration of singles gives the album a consistency -- these were songs devised to get attention -- but, years later, it's astounding how strong this catalog of songs is: "Born Under a Bad Sign," "Crosscut Saw," "Oh Pretty Woman," "The Hunter," "Personal Manager," and "Laundromat Blues" form the very foundation of Albert King's musical identity and legacy. Few blues albums are this on a cut-by-cut level; the songs are exceptional and the performances are rich, from King's dynamic playing to the Southern funk of the MG's. It was immediately influential at the time and, over the years, it has only grown in stature as one of the very greatest electric blues albums of all time. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
HI-RES€25.49
CD€17.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1968 | Craft Recordings

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
HI-RES€25.49
CD€17.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1968 | Craft Recordings

Hi-Res
CD€17.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1968 | Craft Recordings

The New Folk Sound of Terry Callier was not released until 1968, about three years after the project was originally completed; while the long delay almost certainly crippled the momentum of Callier's fledgling career, the impact on the music itself was at most minimal -- while not the singer's best album, it's his most timeless and inviting, adhering closely to the folk stylings addressed by the title while largely ignoring the mystical jazz dimensions which texture his later material. Surprisingly, none of the album's eight songs are originals, relying instead on traditional tunes like "900 Miles" and "Cotton Eyed Joe"; while Callier's spiralling acoustic guitar lines and the use of two bassists (Terbour Attenborough and John Tweedle) reflect his admiration of John Coltrane, New Folk Sound is for the most part stark and simple, possessed of a subtle grace which spotlights his remarkably moving vocals to excellent effect -- it's a debut which holds all the promise fulfilled by his classic recordings for Cadet. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
CD€14.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1969 | Craft Recordings

Norman Greenbaum was much stranger than his big hit "Spirit in the Sky" would suggest. Then again, that tune -- a confident, fuzz-toned paean to God, that sprit in the sky -- is hardly the most conventional of '70s AM anthems, so perhaps it isn't surprising that the album bearing the same title is all over the map, with sub-War low-riding anthems ("Junior Cadillac"), singer/songwriter introspection, eerie post-psychedelic pop (the genuinely unsettling "Marcy"), and utter oddities ("Canned Ham"). That, of course, means that it's far more fascinating than many soft rock curiosities of the early '70s, and the near-schizophrenic cavalcade of material means that the record doesn't hold together, but that's part of what makes it worth hearing. And while Greenbaum wasn't exactly a consistent songwriter, he did hit the mark several times ("Skyline," "Canned Ham," "Jubilee," and "Junior Cadillac" are all strong), and even the misfires are interesting and well-crafted, at least in terms of its early-'70s peers. This doesn't mean that it's a lost gem, but for listeners who want to dig into early '70s AM pop and soft rock, it's certainly worth hearing. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD€17.99

R&B - Released January 1, 1969 | Craft Recordings

CD€21.99

R&B - Released January 1, 1969 | Craft Recordings

HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1970 | Craft Recordings

Hi-Res
CD€10.99

R&B - Released January 1, 1970 | Craft Recordings

Cut in the middle of Taylor's late-'60s and early-'70s stay at Stax, One Step Beyond qualifies as one of the singer's best LPs. Captured in his Southern soul prime, Taylor lets loose on fine mix of gospel-inspired ballads ("I Don't Want to Lose You"), countrified mid-tempo burners ("Party Life"), and breezy stings-and-horns soul ("Will You Love Me Forever"). And, yes, there are such unforgettable hits as "I Am Somebody" and an amazing reading of the jazz standard "Time After Time." A must-have for all Taylor fans. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
CD€14.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1970 | Craft Recordings

HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1970 | Craft Recordings

Hi-Res