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Metal - Released March 29, 2011 | Craft Recordings

In 2011, after Between the Buried and Me announced they would be jumping ship to Metal Blade Records, Victory promptly issued an early-career greatest-hits compilation titled Best Of. Boasting two discs and a bonus DVD with four music videos, as well as some slick packaging, it’s a nice collector’s item for fans, and a good jumping-off point for people looking to get their feet wet with one of the most versatile prog-metalcore groups in the business. Disc one is the most essential. It includes 13 songs from the first three Victory studio albums, with The Silent Circus, Alaska, and Colors picked over chronologically. Unfortunately, it’s not quite the full experience because BTBAM's impressive first self-titled album is not included, and the band’s albums often play conceptually from front to end, but these are minor complaints. The included selections are strong choices that showcase the group’s inventive playing style, imaginative writing, and ability to turn styles at the drop of a dime. Disc two starts with an excellent two-parter from The Great Misdirect, "Mirrors"/"Obfuscation," which turns abruptly from a soft, jazz-influenced ballad into a thrashing nine-minute beast. The remainder of the CD is comprised of five previously unreleased live tracks, to illustrate what a brutal force the band is on-stage. © Jason Lymangrover /TiVo
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Metal - Released October 12, 2010 | Craft Recordings

In a genre with a laundry list of cookie-cutter bands all fighting to grab the attention of a young audience, sometimes distinguishing yourself is a matter of degrees. On their debut full-length, Motionless in White attempt to do just that. Delivering a heavy-hitting does of horror themed metalcore, Creatures finds the band exploring a more gothic sound. With lots of breakdowns, reverse drum swells, good cop/bad cop vocals, and bass bombs, there’s a lot about the album that feels pretty much by the book. Where Motionless in White are able to make it interesting is in the use of their electronic elements. Rather than going for the usual dance-pop sound, the band uses their synthesizers to create a dark and uneasy atmosphere. This blend of the frightening and the familiar gives Creatures not only the ability to draw fans in with something they’ll immediately click with, but which will keep them coming back for another helping. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Metal - Released October 27, 2009 | Craft Recordings

After Between the Buried and Me pushed metalcore purists away with their most progressive release, Colors, they decided to push even harder for their fifth release. A diverse outing with an unruly amount of genres crammed into only six songs, The Great Misdirect is a highly adventurous, very convoluted, wildly dynamic, and extremely difficult listen. Briggs, Waring, Rogers, Waggoner, and Richardson are in top form, with their script-flipping abilities intact and their technical chops at their most extreme. This is a guitarist's album first and foremost (although bass players and drummers are in for a treat as well), and the playing, while showy, is incendiary. Like a cross between Dream Theater (with whom they toured in 2008) and Dillinger Escape Plan, Between the Buried and Me meld creative aptitude and roaring fury as they skate genres, stapling together speed metal, hardcore, carnival jazz, chamber pop, and a few indefinable Mike Patton-esque styles. "Fossil Genera -- A Feed from Cloud Mountain" fuses loungy Henry Mancini piano with metal guitar and guttural growls in a lighthearted way, but this only lasts for a few minutes; the song takes a dark turn into eight minutes of screaming speed metal before seguing into an epic orchestral outro with syrupy singing by vocalist Tommy Rogers. To fit the many moods, Rogers readily switches moods between painful howls and heartfelt singing (with lyrics mainly dealing with alien abductions, the inner workings of the human brain, and magic), but he passes the microphone to guitarist Paul Waggoner for "Desert of Song," a relatively straightforward acoustic Dirt-era Alice in Chains ballad, which builds to a thick finish. It's merely a breather, however, and after five and a half minutes to recoup, the band goes out with "Swim to the Moon": nearly 18 minutes of unflappable and razor-sharp prog metal -- whirlwind scales, snaking solos, and amazingly intricate rhythm twists -- with hair-raising howls, parted by radio rock harmonies. It's an experience, to say the least. At the same time, The Great Misdirect is the type of overblown record that asks the question, "Is there such thing as being too ambitious?" © Jason Lymangrover /TiVo
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Metal - Released October 27, 2009 | Craft Recordings

After Between the Buried and Me pushed metalcore purists away with their most progressive release, Colors, they decided to push even harder for their fifth release. A diverse outing with an unruly amount of genres crammed into only six songs, The Great Misdirect is a highly adventurous, very convoluted, wildly dynamic, and extremely difficult listen. Briggs, Waring, Rogers, Waggoner, and Richardson are in top form, with their script-flipping abilities intact and their technical chops at their most extreme. This is a guitarist's album first and foremost (although bass players and drummers are in for a treat as well), and the playing, while showy, is incendiary. Like a cross between Dream Theater (with whom they toured in 2008) and Dillinger Escape Plan, Between the Buried and Me meld creative aptitude and roaring fury as they skate genres, stapling together speed metal, hardcore, carnival jazz, chamber pop, and a few indefinable Mike Patton-esque styles. "Fossil Genera -- A Feed from Cloud Mountain" fuses loungy Henry Mancini piano with metal guitar and guttural growls in a lighthearted way, but this only lasts for a few minutes; the song takes a dark turn into eight minutes of screaming speed metal before seguing into an epic orchestral outro with syrupy singing by vocalist Tommy Rogers. To fit the many moods, Rogers readily switches moods between painful howls and heartfelt singing (with lyrics mainly dealing with alien abductions, the inner workings of the human brain, and magic), but he passes the microphone to guitarist Paul Waggoner for "Desert of Song," a relatively straightforward acoustic Dirt-era Alice in Chains ballad, which builds to a thick finish. It's merely a breather, however, and after five and a half minutes to recoup, the band goes out with "Swim to the Moon": nearly 18 minutes of unflappable and razor-sharp prog metal -- whirlwind scales, snaking solos, and amazingly intricate rhythm twists -- with hair-raising howls, parted by radio rock harmonies. It's an experience, to say the least. At the same time, The Great Misdirect is the type of overblown record that asks the question, "Is there such thing as being too ambitious?" © Jason Lymangrover /TiVo
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Metal - Released October 14, 2008 | Craft Recordings

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Metal - Released September 18, 2007 | Craft Recordings

Somewhat of an anomaly on the otherwise more conservative, pop-punk and hardcore oriented Victory Records label, Between the Buried and Me play a progressive style of extreme metal that attempts to incorporate a wide range of styles and moods alongside its staple diet of death and power metal. To their credit, with Colors, they manage the transitions very well: frenetic, thrashy riffs are seamlessly traded for thumping metalcore breakdowns, while death grunts and growls sit well alongside soft melodic vocal lines and dense, Porcupine Tree-aping harmonies. Opener "Foam Born, Pt. A: The Backtrack" marries sappy '70s rock piano schlock with furious tapped guitar textures, flowing seamlessly into the aggressive death metal riffing of "Foam Born, Pt. B: The Decade of Statues" and centerpiece "Informal Gluttony." Each of the eight tracks is designed to flow into the next, creating the impression of a continuously evolving piece rather than a collection of tracks, but it's a mixed bag musically. At times the creativity and emotional lure of the material is enchanting, but too often Between the Buried and Me force a constant stream of evolving riffs (it is primarily a guitarist's album) instead of exploring the full depth of the original idea. The effect is less of continuous evolution, than a constant stream of promising and half-baked ideas, and in this instance the color of monotony is rarely too far away. © Dave Donnelly /TiVo
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Metal - Released June 13, 2006 | Craft Recordings

North Carolina's Between the Buried and Me have already established a place for themselves in underground rock with their innovative and seamless combination of hardcore, heavy metal, math rock, and yes, jazz. So for album number four, why not have some fun covering and paying homage to some of the bands that helped get the guys where they are today? Consequently, The Anatomy Of is full of acts that BTBAM shamelessly rocked out to in their bedrooms, furiously tried emulating as teenagers learning instruments, and well, just sat back in awe of the power great music holds. And far from being a one-track band drawing from a single genre of inspiration, BTBAM have included a rather diverse range: Pantera, Earth Crisis, Depeche Mode, King Crimson, Smashing Pumpkins, Faith No More, and Mötley Crüe, to name a few. The eclectic mix of groups says a lot about why BTBAM are so musically dexterous, especially since each song, style, attitude, or whatever is pulled off with a fluid capability that speaks volumes for their talents -- individually and as a band. Stripped-down songs like Counting Crows' "Colorblind" and Blind Melon's "Change" showcase vocals with a naked vulnerability not always observed in heavy music. And the fact that they can pull off Pink Floyd's expansive "Us and Them" as believably as their especially heavy take on Metallica's "Blackened" is impressive to say the least. Through drastic vocal changes -- from the abrasive guttural attack of Sepultura's "Territory" to the acoustic jam of "Change" to the eccentric vocal harmony fun of Queen's "Bicycle Race" -- one almost forgets it's the same band performing. The album was an ambitious undertaking that BTBAM pull off with an unfaltering confidence that makes up for the occasional awkward moment along the way. So while the Crüe's "Kickstart My Heart" is missing a bit of that hair metal recklessness, and Tommy Rogers' voice doesn't strike as hard as Soundgarden's Chris Cornell on "The Day I Tried to Live" (and the crude background vocals could be done without, as well), listeners should hardly care. Complete with member liner-note commentary about the reasoning for or fan-boy love of certain songs, The Anatomy Of is a solid release that should further inspire fans unfamiliar with some of the covers to expand their own musical repertoire. It's just BTBAM's way of sharing the love. © Corey Apar /TiVo
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Metal - Released September 6, 2005 | Craft Recordings

Between the Buried and Me's forward-thinking musical agenda was already well established by the release of third album, Alaska (their second for Victory Records), but it's questionable whether their complex creative vision had yet coalesced in such stunningly satisfying fashion. Come to think of it, there is no argument. Perhaps it was the frustratingly continuous membership turnover that marred those past near-misses, because although there was no telling as of yet that the quintet responsible for Alaska would in fact go on to embody BTBAM's definitive lineup, in retrospect, it's quite obvious why they meshed here, and then stuck together. On Alaska, BTBAM's hardcore foundation definitively assumed the role of springboard for their wilder, cross-genre experimentation, often involving gentle passages composed of elegiac acoustic guitar work, flowing basslines, jazzy percussion, and surprisingly timid vocals, all wrapped in a gauze of soothing synthesizers. Opening statement "All Bodies" and, later, "Backwards Marathon" beautifully exemplify these contrasts, riding the very extremes of possible hard/soft delivery and instrumentation as they follow their winding treasure maps to the X that marks the spot. "Medicine Wheel" is all evanescent bliss, and the deceptively named "Laser Speed" goes all bossa nova, while "The Primer" begins like vintage melodic power metal before unveiling its savage side, and another eye-opening number, "Selkies: The Endless Obsession," resembles a new millennium reconstruction of Rush: from the "Tom Sawyer"-winking synth intro to the circular riff contortions that precede the ensuing thrash-out to the gentle interruption that rebuilds gradually like Opeth meeting Dream Theater. And despite all these daring investigations, Between the Buried and Me could still convulse, shudder, and retch along with the best mathcore practitioners out there -- the serpentine cataclysm of a title track, "Roboturner," and others prove as much -- making Alaska about as well-balanced as anything this emotionally schizophrenic and musically eclectic group could possibly be. Between the Buried and Me had never flown higher and would probably never fly this high again. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Metal - Released September 6, 2005 | Craft Recordings

Between the Buried and Me's forward-thinking musical agenda was already well established by the release of third album, Alaska (their second for Victory Records), but it's questionable whether their complex creative vision had yet coalesced in such stunningly satisfying fashion. Come to think of it, there is no argument. Perhaps it was the frustratingly continuous membership turnover that marred those past near-misses, because although there was no telling as of yet that the quintet responsible for Alaska would in fact go on to embody BTBAM's definitive lineup, in retrospect, it's quite obvious why they meshed here, and then stuck together. On Alaska, BTBAM's hardcore foundation definitively assumed the role of springboard for their wilder, cross-genre experimentation, often involving gentle passages composed of elegiac acoustic guitar work, flowing basslines, jazzy percussion, and surprisingly timid vocals, all wrapped in a gauze of soothing synthesizers. Opening statement "All Bodies" and, later, "Backwards Marathon" beautifully exemplify these contrasts, riding the very extremes of possible hard/soft delivery and instrumentation as they follow their winding treasure maps to the X that marks the spot. "Medicine Wheel" is all evanescent bliss, and the deceptively named "Laser Speed" goes all bossa nova, while "The Primer" begins like vintage melodic power metal before unveiling its savage side, and another eye-opening number, "Selkies: The Endless Obsession," resembles a new millennium reconstruction of Rush: from the "Tom Sawyer"-winking synth intro to the circular riff contortions that precede the ensuing thrash-out to the gentle interruption that rebuilds gradually like Opeth meeting Dream Theater. And despite all these daring investigations, Between the Buried and Me could still convulse, shudder, and retch along with the best mathcore practitioners out there -- the serpentine cataclysm of a title track, "Roboturner," and others prove as much -- making Alaska about as well-balanced as anything this emotionally schizophrenic and musically eclectic group could possibly be. Between the Buried and Me had never flown higher and would probably never fly this high again. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Metal - Released October 21, 2003 | Craft Recordings

Between the Buried and Me's debut album for Victory Records, The Silent Circus, showcases a great amount of diversity for a metal band, very similar to heavier bands like Opeth and Dillinger Escape Plan. One minute the band may be playing thrash metal and the next they're flowing into death metal growls and thick guitar riffs. They certainly show a mastery of the hardcore and metal styles that many bands their age can take a lot longer to understand. The metal take on things can seemingly change in a flash as lead singer Tommy Rogers fleshes out his vocals and utilizes the keyboards to create something that sounds more like it should be on a Smashing Pumpkins album. This might make some fans of heavy music grimace in objection, but there's definitely a lot to be encouraged by with The Silent Circus. © Kurt Morris /TiVo
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Metal - Released October 7, 2003 | Craft Recordings

Between the Buried and Me's debut album for Victory Records, The Silent Circus, showcases a great amount of diversity for a metal band, very similar to heavier bands like Opeth and Dillinger Escape Plan. One minute the band may be playing thrash metal and the next they're flowing into death metal growls and thick guitar riffs. They certainly show a mastery of the hardcore and metal styles that many bands their age can take a lot longer to understand. The metal take on things can seemingly change in a flash as lead singer Tommy Rogers fleshes out his vocals and utilizes the keyboards to create something that sounds more like it should be on a Smashing Pumpkins album. This might make some fans of heavy music grimace in objection, but there's definitely a lot to be encouraged by with The Silent Circus. © Kurt Morris /TiVo
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Metal - Released April 30, 2002 | Craft Recordings

A group such as Between the Buried and Me is rare to find, as the jaw-dropping talent possessed by these five men seems almost too good to be true. While their eponymous debut is a muddled affair, the amazing skill of these musicians is quite obvious, careening from one extreme to another with little regard for human safety. The only real problem noticeable on this disc is the slight lack of direction, as every song is a seething concoction of math rock and pummeling heavy metal with little room for effective song structures. The members of Between the Buried and Me are also determined and vicious in their beliefs, as "Arsonist" is a horrific stab at a specific Kansas church that preaches against homosexuality. Very few groups have the courage to stand up and speak so freely, and for this Between the Buried and Me should be applauded. This is a chaotic album that rains with fiery determination, and even its weaknesses are thoroughly enjoyable, marking it as one of the fiercest albums in the hardcore community. © Jason D. Taylor /TiVo
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Metal - Released April 30, 2002 | Craft Recordings

A group such as Between the Buried and Me is rare to find, as the jaw-dropping talent possessed by these five men seems almost too good to be true. While their eponymous debut is a muddled affair, the amazing skill of these musicians is quite obvious, careening from one extreme to another with little regard for human safety. The only real problem noticeable on this disc is the slight lack of direction, as every song is a seething concoction of math rock and pummeling heavy metal with little room for effective song structures. The members of Between the Buried and Me are also determined and vicious in their beliefs, as "Arsonist" is a horrific stab at a specific Kansas church that preaches against homosexuality. Very few groups have the courage to stand up and speak so freely, and for this Between the Buried and Me should be applauded. This is a chaotic album that rains with fiery determination, and even its weaknesses are thoroughly enjoyable, marking it as one of the fiercest albums in the hardcore community. © Jason D. Taylor /TiVo