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Classical - To be released October 1, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - To be released September 17, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - To be released September 10, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - To be released September 3, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - To be released August 27, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - To be released August 27, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - To be released August 13, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - To be released August 13, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - To be released August 6, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released July 23, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Restriction and reflection. Like every choir, the Zurich Chamber Singers have been particularly suffering since the beginning of the pandemic due to the restrictions and limitations imposed by hygiene regulations. Canceled concerts, canceled recordings, but then at the beginning of 2021 came along the possibility of recording with a small ensemble. Conductor and ensemble leader Christian Erny saw the opportunity and seized it: "The composition falls into a time when Scarlatti had a very good choir at his disposal. We assume that he thought that he could draw from the full. It's really 25 minutes of the highest intensity with ten solo voices cast, and it goes from the innermost sorrow, from the most intimate despair, to operatic drama that at times you feel the piece is exploding". And that with only ten voices. Scarlatti's setting of the medieval funeral poem of Jesus' sorrowful mother standing in front of the cross of her own son displays the full range of emotions of the text. Scarlatti, who is more commonly known for his 555 Sonatas, exploits the vocal possibilities to the full, creating a dense web that the Zurich Chamber Singers never allow to become opaque. © Berlin Classics
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Classical - Released July 23, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - Released July 16, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - Released July 9, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - Released July 9, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - Released July 9, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - Released June 25, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - Released June 18, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Rock - Released June 11, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - Released May 28, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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With "Binary Star", trombonist Peter Steiner and organist Constanze Hochwartner take you on a journey through the infinite expanses of the cosmos. The program of the album unites different composers and spans the musical arc from the late romantic Gustav Mahler to the film music composer John Williams. After the Austrian trombonist presented his album "Sapphire" with Constanze Hochwartner on piano in 2018, the two pull out bigger guns on "Binary Star". These allow them to simultaneously present a range of sounds appropriate to the album's theme and dust off the time-honored combination of wind instrument and organ. "This brilliant combination allows us to create a wide variety of timbres and to realize all the musical ideas we have in the best possible way", say Peter Steiner and Constanze Hochwartner. Their program leads once across the galaxy and consists of orchestral literature, which the two arranged and had arranged for their instruments themselves. Like the launch of a rocket, the musical prelude is Strauss' Also sprach Zarathustra, probably the most famous and impressive introductory piece in music history. Gustav Holst's Planets is given its own unique character and sound by the new arrangement and instrumentation. This is followed by excerpts of "From the New World", Dvorak's 9th Symphony, the energetic Summon the Heroes by John Williams, Gustav Mahler's Urlicht and Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera. The finale - almost as if disappearing into the infinity of space - is an arrangement of Samuel Barber's famous Adagio, originally for string orchestra, here for solo organ. The realization of this album is associated with great enthusiasm for the duo. Steiner and Hochwartner are a well-rehearsed team, which is reflected in their musical interplay. "For three and a half years", says Peter Steiner, "Constanze and I have been looking forward to this project. And I'm thrilled with the outstanding skills of Emily Horton, who wrote the arrangements". © Berlin Classics
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Classical - Released May 21, 2021 | Berlin Classics

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On her debut album for Berlin Classics, Sarah Christian performs no less a work than Tchaikovsky’s warhorse, his Violin Concerto, ably supported by the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen under Jéremie Rhorer. For full measure, she plays Tchaikovsky’s Souvenir de Florence. Sarah Christian is able to do more here than show off her brilliant technical skills; her love of chamber music can be clearly heard and clearly felt. Tchaikovsky composed both his Violin Concerto and his Sextet "Souvenir de Florence" when he was at a spa, recovering from depression and nervous breakdown. Vigorous and virtuosic, but also tuneful and romantic, each work reflects this sense of recovery, the surge of new energy in convalescence. This album means a lot to the soloist, as can again be seen in her bond with the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen, of which she has been leader since 2013. She speaks of it as her “musical family”, an assurance that comes across musically in the challenges of the Violin Concerto. Sarah Christian has an equally personal relationship with her fellow-musicians in the Sextet. Johannes Strake, Wen Xiao Zhen, Jano Lisboa, Jan-Erik Gustaffson and Maximilian Hornung are friends and companions with whom she can share a joke, relish thrilling experiences and discuss how to bring the music to life. The Violin Concerto is certainly not a work that is seldom recorded, in fact it is to be heard in several competing versions. Its original dedicatee Leopold Auer considered Tchaikovsky’s version “unplayable”, not so much for its technical difficulty but because of what he described as “un-violin-like” passages that he subjected to revision. His own version makes significant cuts in the last movement. Superstars like Heifetz and Kreisler preferred this version; as for Sarah, she plays the original with all the notes that Tchaikovsky gave it. The life-affirming, cheerful Sextet, in which Tchaikovsky brilliantly blends Italian sweetness and songfulness with Russian folk melody and Brahmsian counterpoint, achieves the very effect that the soloist was aiming for: it is bursting with power and energy. © Berlin Classics