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Pop - Released September 27, 2002 | Parlophone France

The double-disc set C'Était Ici presents Yann Tiersen live in concert, performing highlights from his five studio albums and his score for the French film Amélie, the work for which he may be most widely known. While "La Valse d'Amélie" and "L'Autre Valse d'Amélie" sound just as sparkling and magical here as they did in the movie and on its soundtrack, and songs such as "C'Était Ici" and "Rue des Cascades" follow suit, the album gives equal time to the other sides of Tiersen's music. The pieces with vocals are particularly striking, especially "La Rupture," a winding epic that is as eerie as it is beautiful. The mellow, romantic "La Terrasse," meanwhile, highlights the undercurrents of French pop and rock that influence his work. Hints of French folk can be heard on tracks like "Déjà Loin" and the modern-day gypsy fiddling of "Sur le Fil," emphasizing the fact that while Tiersen blends elements of classical, pop, rock, and folk into his music, all of it is quintessentially French. The live format especially suits some of his more energetic songs, such as "Le Jour d'Avant" and "Le Banquet," both of which feature explosive, rock-oriented drumming. Then again, the beautifully intimate renditions of Serge Gainsbourg's "La Noyée" and Tiersen's own "Le Moulin" are just as powerful in a quiet way. The second disc digs deeper into Tiersen's discography, offering more of his longer, more involved compositions such as the swooning "Bagatelle," a collaboration with Dominique Ané, and the 12-minute "Fevrier," which conjures images of the grayest, longest-seeming month with ticking percussion and jittery, atonal pianos, guitars, and brass. Other highlights include the dreamy "Le Méridien" and "La Parade," which feature appropriately somnolent vocals from Lisa Germano, another of Tiersen's frequent collaborators, and the gorgeous "Monochrome," a paradoxically vivid description of day-to-day tedium sung by Ané. C'Était Ici functions almost like a greatest-hits collection of Tiersen's work: a welcome reminder for fans of his diverse talent, and an introduction to the rest of his work for those charmed by Amélie. While most two-hour live albums don't necessarily make a good introduction to an artist's work, C'Était Ici is a very happy exception to that rule. ~ Heather Phares
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Film Soundtracks - Released June 16, 2008 | Peermusic France

Tabarly is a soundtrack for a 2008 documentary film of the same name written and performed by French composer and musician Yann Tiersen. This was his first soundtrack work in five years. The soundtrack was more laid-back and minimalistic compared to Tiersen's other, more whimsical work on films such as Amélie and Good Bye Lenin! -- some of the compositions were performed with only a piano or guitar. As usual, Tiersen played all the instrumental parts himself. ~ Sergey Mesenov
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Pop - Released November 13, 2006 | Parlophone France

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Pop - Released October 5, 2001 | Parlophone France

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
This ambitious and successful project will undoubtedly remain a highlight in Yann Tiersen's career. The French composer still wears his influences on his sleeve, but does a better job at channeling them to create a truly personal music. For instance, he has been regularly accused of simply revamping the French tradition of musette waltz, but on this record these references subside in favor of a more diversified and modern musical approach. Tiersen also relies less on instrumentals and further develops his songwriting skills, which benefit from the participation of some distinguished guests. Lisa Germano lends her talents to two songs on which her whispery and almost lethargic voice fits as a glove. The beautifully orchestrated "Les jours tristes" reveals the Divine Comedy's Neil Hannon at his own very best and is an excellent reason to wish for a full-length collaboration. The instrumentals, however, do not lag behind. Tiersen's abilities as an instrumentalist shine on two solo pieces. In particular, "Qu'en reste-t-il?," on which he is featured on viola, reaches a climax of an intensity and harshness unheard of in Tiersen's output. Another highlight is "Le jour d'avant," an uplifting piece delving into the Balkan Gypsy tradition. With a prevailing bittersweet playfulness and forlorn atmosphere, L'Absente comes through as an endearing and inspired collection of first-rate compositions and songs. ~ Alain Drouot
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Pop - Released May 20, 2005 | Parlophone France

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 30, 2016 | Mute

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 15, 2019 | Mute

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Rock - Released May 19, 2014 | Mute

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Rock - Released October 11, 2011 | Mute

Even in the Information Age, the world still hasn't become quite so small as people like to think. Otherwise, a talent like Yann Tiersen wouldn't have avoided international recognition for so long. French composer/multi-instrumentalist Tiersen is a classically trained musician who came of age in the post-punk era, and both of those musical worlds inform his work. Despite many years of high-profile solo albums, soundtracks, and collaborations with everyone from Jane Birkin to the Divine Comedy, Dust Lane is his first album for a U.S. label. It's a rich, moody, multi-layered work that finds Tiersen showing off his instrumental prowess and playing a wide array of instruments from strings to synthesizers on his haunting classical/rock compositions. Vocal-oriented tracks like "Fuck Me" show Tiersen's poppier side, achieving an infectious, anthemic sound somewhere between M83 and Broken Social Scene, while "Ashes" seems more in line with the extensive soundtrack work he's done in the past as it builds gradually from tension-building strings and horror-film piano plunking to fuzzed-out guitar squalls and choral vocal chants. The dominant feeling on Dust Lane, though, is that of an artist who reveres Ravel and the Swans in equal measure, as exemplified by "Dark Stuff" and "Palestine," where deeply muttered spoken vocals punctuate a dark, dramatic blend of driving, rock-derived rhythms, European folk modalities, and a symphonic brand of sonic conception that sets Tiersen apart from mere murky moodmeisters. Dust Lane is the kind of record that draws you into its own little world and sweeps you along with its journey, as unsettling as it is intriguing. ~ J. Allen
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Rock - Released October 17, 2011 | Mute

On Skyline, Yann Tiersen goes further down the path he forged on Dust Lane, moving away from the delicate, keyboard-driven reveries that marked early work such as the tracks collected for the Amélie score or the music for Good Bye Lenin! and toward a post-rock-tinged sound that, despite its differences, is just as widescreen-ready. While the galloping rhythms and swift melody of "Forgive Me" are most like the works that won Tiersen a legion of film buff fans, most of Skyline evokes comparisons to other artists. The bursts of instant-gratification guitars on "Another Shore" could come just as easily from Smashing Pumpkins' "Today" or from Mogwai, while twinkly, bittersweet tunes like "I'm Gonna Live Anyhow" and "The Trial" call to mind Múm or Morr Music acts such as Borko; still elsewhere, the lush romanticism of "The Gutter"'s dream pop recalls Saturdays=Youth-era M83 and the odd mix of screaming, toy piano, and glockenspiel on "Exit 25 Block 20" seems like something Fuck Buttons would attempt. While Tiersen tries on different approaches for size on each of Skyline's songs, his nimble melodic sense and unfailing skill at evoking the right mood at the right time are unmistakable. Skyline isn't as obviously dark as Dust Lane was, but melancholy pervades the entire album, welling to the surface on "Hesitation Wound," where Tiersen's frail voice drifts farther and farther away from the listener and into a galaxy of strafing synths. While this album and Dust Lane sacrifice some of his recognizable sound, the possibilities laid open for Tiersen are too intriguing not to pursue. ~ Heather Phares
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Pop - Released April 23, 2001 | Parlophone France

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Pop - Released February 3, 2003 | Parlophone France

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Pop/Rock - Released November 19, 2012 | Ici d'ailleurs

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Film Soundtracks - Released June 3, 2016 | madoro music

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Pop/Rock - Released January 21, 2013 | Ici d'ailleurs

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Pop/Rock - Released November 19, 2012 | Ici d'ailleurs

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Pop/Rock - Released January 21, 2013 | Ici d'ailleurs

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 28, 2013 | Ici d'ailleurs

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Pop/Rock - Released November 19, 2012 | Ici d'ailleurs

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Film Soundtracks - Released November 26, 2012 | Ici d'ailleurs