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€13.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1966 | Verve

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Verve

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1966 | Verve

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World - Released January 1, 1967 | Verve Reissues

Fortunately, Walter Wanderley sticks mostly to Brazilian standards on Batucada, and though his lounge-organ sound occasionally veers close to the edge where cool jazz becomes easy listening, the album is well-recorded. His organ is occasionally more reminiscent of a hockey rink accompanist than a jazz improviser, but he slips and slides around on the keys and employs an endearing and quintessentially Brazilian less-is-more approach. Brazilian mastermind Marcos Valle guests on guitar, and percussion is well-handled by Paulinho, Dom Um Romao, and Lu Lu Ferreira. Talya Ferro's vocals on "Wave" are solidly in a jazz vein, though rather transparently postured to captivate an American crossover audience. Obviously, an album like Batucada isn't a prime example of Brazilian pop, but fans of Wanderley's work on Astrud Gilberto's A Certain Smile, A Certain Sadness will enjoy this as background music. ~ John Bush
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Jazz - Released September 1, 1999 | Verve Reissues

The notes for this CD ask, "What issue is more topical than the Brazilian rain forest? So what reissue would be more topical than Walter Wanderley's Rain Forest?" Politically, this may be true, but musically, this collection is anything but topical. From the first tune -- the monster hit "Summer Samba," the listener is catapulted straight back to the '60s when bossa nova was new in the U.S. and everyone wanted a piece of it. Organist Wanderley made a big splash with this CD, which went platinum in two years -- and it does evoke strong water images, like "poolside" and "ice skating rink." The jazzmen are underutilized, since most of the tracks are less than three minutes long and leave little room to stretch out. One exception is the pretty Ferreira/Marconi ballad "Rain," the only track where Wanderley plays piano rather than organ and which features a fine solo by Urbie Green on trombone. On "Beach Samba," Green gets to noodle a bit, but Bucky Pizarelli is heard stating the melody and nothing else. Despite all the sadness implied in the song titles, this CD has a jaunty feel to it and will be best enjoyed by nostalgic fans of that bygone era. ~ Judith Schlesinger
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Classical - Released October 5, 1959 | EMI

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World - Released July 2, 2018 | 69 digital

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Pop - Released December 6, 2018 | CMB Music Ltd

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1969 | A&M Jazz

Wanderley's second album during Creed Taylor's A&M residency opens with a bang, a fantastic rendition of the old Northern Brazilian standard "Asa Branca" that evokes the exhilaration of a street carnival. Midway through, the tempo kicks up, the band settles into a two-chord vamp, and the performance lifts into orbit; even the normally mild-mannered Wanderley dances wildly on organ and electric harpsichord. Nothing else here, even the provocatively titled "Proton, Electron, Neutron," approaches "Asa Branca"'s energy. Yet on the whole, this is a somewhat better album than its predecessor on A&M; the sound is more open and less confined. The selection remains predominantly Brazilian, with an occasional American ringer like "Soulful Strut" and another Jimmy Webb tune, "5:30 Plane." The female voices (one of whom is Flora Purim) return on a few tracks; so do Hubert Laws and Romeo Penque on flutes. Eumir Deodato is in charge of the mauve-colored charts for flutes, trumpets and violas, and Airto Moreira makes an early impression pumping up the percussion section. ~ Richard S. Ginell
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Pop - Released April 8, 1963 | EMI Music Brasil Ltda

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World - Released December 21, 2018 | 69 digital

€8.99

World - Released September 21, 2018 | 69 digital

€14.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released May 19, 1998 | Verve Reissues

Possibly because he favored drippy orchestrated arrangements crossed with bossa nova beats, organist Walter Wanderley never received much attention when he was recording in the '60s. However, in the rush to uncover forgotten "lounge" recordings, Verve stumbled upon his records and decided that his overblown, occasionally campy Latin jazz was worth reissue. They assembled a 16-track compilation from his three albums for Verve, effectively selecting highlights like "Popcorn," "Agua de Beber," "The Girl from Ipanema," "Summer Samba," "Wave," "Beach Samba," and "Music to Watch Girls By." It's a good summary of his Verve years, featuring the best tracks from his uneven albums. There are certainly better places to hear bossa nova, even pop-oriented Latin jazz, but there are still some good moments on Talkin' Verve, especially if you favor kitsch over quality. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released October 1, 1964 | EMI Music Brasil Ltda

€8.99

Latin America - Released August 15, 2018 | Bella Donna

€4.04

Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released March 15, 2019 | Sandstone

€4.04

Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released February 15, 2019 | Sandstone

€14.99

Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 6, 1964 | EMI Music Brasil Ltda