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Alternative & Indie - Released January 26, 2018 | Cooking Vinyl

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With Ether Song which came out in 2003, Turin Brakes quickly became a cult group for lovers of indie pop filtered through folk. A speciality of this London group led by Olly Knights and Gale Paridjanian, is fine melodic tapestries which, while not necessarily brimming with revolutionary originality, were certainly charming enough… In 2018 and after weathering many storms, Turin Brakes were finally able to put the finishing touches to an eighth album, which centres on lovingly-worked vocal harmonies and melodic frameworks. Early fans, like those who love Coldplay, Fleetwood Mac or James Taylor will certainly appreciate it...© CM/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 2001 | Source UK

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Rock - Released January 29, 2016 | Cooking Vinyl

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There's a subtle folk influence in the music of Turin Brakes, but theirs is not music you're ever going to hear around a campfire on a chilly evening; instead, this is folk music for moody young people pondering life and love alone in their bedrooms late at night, and the fact group founders and key songwriters Olly Knights and Gale Paridjanian still have anything to say about these subjects 15 years after their first LP is a testimony to their enduring strength as both writers and recording artists. Arriving in 2016, Lost Property is dominated by gentle but thoughtful melodies built around guitar patterns where electric and acoustic sounds walk hand in hand, accompanied by dynamic bursts of keyboards and strings. The lines of these tracks are impressively clean and polished; while the performances often seem languid, the group's clever use of the relief between the loud and the quiet brings Lost Property an impact that's big and spacious, and the sweetly sad tone of the vocals is a good match for the emotions of the music, imaging a young person's world with the experience of a middle-aged man to draw upon. In fact, Turin Brakes evoke the sound of a young man's lovelorn view of the world so vividly that it's a bit hard to imagine this band has been around since 2001 and hasn't fully matured into a group with more to say about the long-term relationships that are the stuff of adult lives. But if Turin Brakes' world-view has changed little over the years, their embrace of the craft of record-making has only improved, and Lost Property is an impressive document of their skills in the recording studio. ~ Mark Deming
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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | Virgin Catalogue

Virgin Records' Bottled at Source: The Best of the Source Years collects 34 tracks culled from unassuming Brit-pop duo Turin Brakes' first decade. Friends since elementary school, Olly Knights and Gale Paridjanian started releasing records together under the moniker in 1999, and their contemplative, quietly anthemic brand of folk-infused modern rock (think Starsailor, Kings of Convenience, Elbow, and Coldplay) soon earned them numerous accolades in their British homeland. Released to coincide with the tenth anniversary of their debut single, "The Door," the two-disc Bottled at Source features a 17-track studio overview and a 17-track collection of B-sides and live/unreleased tracks. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Rock - Released February 28, 2010 | Cooking Vinyl

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Rock - Released January 1, 2005 | Source UK

Turin Brakes' third release blends the lighthearted escapism of their debut and the slickly produced escapism of their sophomore release for a satisfying, tambourine-slapping good time. Acoustic guitars are still the thing and Ollie Knights' voice is still a cross between Jeff Buckley and early David Bowie, but the songwriting has improved drastically. Knights and his duo partner, Gale Paridjanian, have never been considered the greatest lyricists, and while the somewhat improved prose on Jackinabox won't change that, the arrangements are much tighter than ever and cover up whatever lyrical deficiencies the charismatic, freewheeling attitude of the band doesn't. When they offer upbeat, infectious, neo-hippie numbers like the funky "Asleep With the Fireflies" (Jamiroquai for the acoustic set) or "Over and Over" (a playful, nearly cabaret song), the album excels and fits summery afternoons like a glove. The wistful ballads are more hit or miss, the widescreen "Road to Nowhere" being an example of direct hit with the meandering "Forever" being a tedious miss that feels totally out of place. Sliding guitars, xylophones, and electronic touches flush out the sound, and the duo's complete involvement with the recording -- producing, engineering, etc. -- gives it a comfortable, "at home" feel. Fans won't be disappointed in the least, and with so much growth displayed, they should probably make room for converts. ~ David Jeffries
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Rock - Released January 1, 2003 | Source UK

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Rock - Released September 30, 2013 | Cooking Vinyl

Turin Brakes' sixth studio album, 2013's We Were Here, features more of the folky British duo's melodic, heartfelt music. As with Turin Brakes' previous efforts, We Were Here showcases the songwriting talents of guitarist/vocalist Olly Knights and guitarist/vocalist Gale Paridjanian. The album comes almost three years after the band's previous effort, 2010's Outbursts. It also appears on the heels of Knights' 2012 solo album, If Not Now When. Together as Turin Brakes, Knights and Paridjanian make sophisticated, often epic and deeply emotional '60s and '70s folk-influenced pop music, and We Were Here is no exception. Interestingly, Knights and Paridjanian were inspired to make We Were Here after they took the time to relearn many of their older songs. They also kept the intimate sound of their best work by recording the album live, utilizing recorded-to-tape backing tracks. The result is that We Were Here, while still sounding fresh and inspired on its own terms, is imbued with much of the lyrical passion and melodicism of Turin Brakes' past work. Here we get such songs as the lilting title track, the expansive, Pink Floyd-ish "Blindsided Again," and the rollicking and soulful "Guess You Heard." Elsewhere, the band digs into the bluesy ballad "Sleeper, the similarly country and blues-inflected "Inbetween," and the atmospheric, Mazzy Star-sounding slow-burn ballad "Erase Everything." ~ Matt Collar
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Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Source UK

Though a departure from their previous works, Dark on Fire is a welcome change for Turin Brakes that should appeal to fans old and new. The group flirts with both garage rock and new wave/post-punk revival on this offering, but don't settle on either style. Rather than sounding inconsistent, the approach emphasizes the indie rockers' versatility and showcases Olly Knights' haunting, unconventional vocals. Dark on Fire is evenly divided between introspection and more upbeat (if not cheerful) numbers, though their ability to work as a well-honed ensemble is a constant throughout. The album does tend toward the lighter side -- even the more rollicking songs aren't particularly hard or heavy -- and has a certain transparency to it, with each layer (vocals, guitar, bass, drums, and occasionally piano, strings, or keyboards) clearly audible and given equal weight. Nowhere is this more evident than on the album's title track. Beginning with muted guitar chords and a nearly androgynous vocal delivery from Knights (who is matched by the tight harmonies from fellow guitarist/vocalist Gale Paridjanian), "Dark on Fire" builds slowly, eventually integrating strings and understated percussion. It's ethereal, moving and quietly powerful, with a chorus that ebbs, flows and lingers even after the song is over. Its placement in the middle of the album seems deliberate -- preceded and followed by more guitar-driven numbers, the song is set apart, making its stark emotion even more pronounced. Beyond the album's centerpiece, Dark on Fire has much more to offer. Each of the album's tracks is strong enough to stand on its own; there is enough variation among the songs to keep things interesting, but enough stylistic cohesion to avoid any jarring inconsistencies. The first two tracks, "Last Chance" and "Ghost," immediately make the case for Turin Brakes' strengths, highlighting both the band's refined approach and cool attitude. The combination does make for a misstep with the somewhat overwrought "New Star" ("Here Comes the Moon" would have made a fine closer), but it's forgivable for a band that branches out with beautiful results. ~ Katherine Fulton
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Rock - Released November 2, 2015 | Cooking Vinyl

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Rock - Released January 1, 2003 | Source UK

Since their first release on Anvil Records way back in 1999, Ollie Knights and Gale Paridjanian's Turin Brakes has enjoyed a meteoric rise, making the short list for Best Newcomer at the annual British Music Industry awards before underlining the not inconsiderable sales of their inaugural full-length, The Optimist, with a Mercury nomination shortly afterwards. Notably, they didn't win, but both assisted in building a groundswell of support into a veritable force majeure which resulted in this sophomore follow-up cracking open the U.K. Top Ten on the week of its release. While their aforementioned debut revelled in its low fidelity, the pair chose to draft in Tony Hoffer -- accomplished producer for such notables as Air and Beck -- for Ether Song. The resultant album builds considerable muscle to the skeletal frailty of intricate guitar work while commendably maintaining all that was good from their debut. The opening "Blue Hour" sets the tone for the rest of the album, a sprawling analogue introduction brought into focus through the fret skills of Paridjanian, before Knights' angelic vocal appears like an apparition from the aural fog. Obvious singles "Painkiller" and "Long Distance" echo the singalong sensibilities of previous hits "Emergency 72" and "Underdog," but there is much, much more here -- Hoffer having evidently oiled the screechy little Brakes -- "Panic Attack" conjuring up the paranoiac side of Syd Barrett as "Little Brother" rocks like The Optimist never quite managed to. Despite these diversions however, it is the softly spoken cuts which make for the highlights with "Full of Stars" and the closing "Ether Song," both stunning examples of a band that still have more to offer ~ Kingsley Marshall
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Rock - Released January 1, 2003 | Source UK

Since their first release on Anvil Records way back in 1999, Ollie Knights and Gale Paridjanian's Turin Brakes has enjoyed a meteoric rise, making the short list for Best Newcomer at the annual British Music Industry awards before underlining the not inconsiderable sales of their inaugural full-length, The Optimist, with a Mercury nomination shortly afterwards. Notably, they didn't win, but both assisted in building a groundswell of support into a veritable force majeure which resulted in this sophomore follow-up cracking open the U.K. Top Ten on the week of its release. While their aforementioned debut revelled in its low fidelity, the pair chose to draft in Tony Hoffer -- accomplished producer for such notables as Air and Beck -- for Ether Song. The resultant album builds considerable muscle to the skeletal frailty of intricate guitar work while commendably maintaining all that was good from their debut. The opening "Blue Hour" sets the tone for the rest of the album, a sprawling analogue introduction brought into focus through the fret skills of Paridjanian, before Knights' angelic vocal appears like an apparition from the aural fog. Obvious singles "Painkiller" and "Long Distance" echo the singalong sensibilities of previous hits "Emergency 72" and "Underdog," but there is much, much more here -- Hoffer having evidently oiled the screechy little Brakes -- "Panic Attack" conjuring up the paranoiac side of Syd Barrett as "Little Brother" rocks like The Optimist never quite managed to. Despite these diversions however, it is the softly spoken cuts which make for the highlights with "Full of Stars" and the closing "Ether Song," both stunning examples of a band that still have more to offer ~ Kingsley Marshall
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Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | Source UK

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Rock - Released March 11, 2012 | Concert Live

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Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Source UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 8, 2016 | Cooking Vinyl

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Pop - Released September 4, 2009 | Virgin Catalogue

Virgin Records' Bottled at Source: The Best of the Source Years collects 34 tracks culled from unassuming Brit-pop duo Turin Brakes' first decade. Friends since elementary school, Olly Knights and Gale Paridjanian started releasing records together under the moniker in 1999, and their contemplative, quietly anthemic brand of folk-infused modern rock (think Starsailor, Kings of Convenience, Elbow, and Coldplay) soon earned them numerous accolades in their British homeland. Released to coincide with the tenth anniversary of their debut single, "The Door," the two-disc Bottled at Source features a 17-track studio overview and a 17-track collection of B-sides and live/unreleased tracks. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 12, 2018 | Cooking Vinyl

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 28, 2010 | Cooking Vinyl

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Rock - Released January 1, 2005 | Source UK