Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD€7.99

Country - Released September 14, 2009 | Domino Recording Co

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CD€9.99

Country - Released February 19, 2016 | Fat Possum

From
CD€13.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1972 | Capitol Records

This is the second perfect album Van Zandt cut in 1972, a complement to High, Low and in Between. Together they contain the highest points of his brilliant but erratic career. The Late Great may be a bit stronger, with classics like "Pancho & Lefty," "No Lonesome Tune," and "If I Needed You," but there's not a weak track here. Van Zandt's voice is in top shape, the song selection is superb, and Jack Clement's understated production gives the tunes a timeless quality. He eschews the hokey touches that make parts of Our Mother the Mountain sound corny, opting for a subdued sound that uses light touches of folk, pop, and country music in their arrangements. The set opens with "No Lonesome Tune," one of Van Zandt's more hopeful songs, delivered with mandolin, quiet pedal steel, and piano complementing Van Zandt's poignant vocal. "Sad Cinderella" and the epic "Silver Ships of Andilar" are mysterious ballads with oblique lyrics, open to many interpretations. In the Van Zandt documentary Be Here to Love Me the singer says that his goal is to write songs so peculiar that "nobody knows what they mean, not even me." He succeeds with these two numbers. "Sad Cinderella" could be a song of recrimination to a woman at the end of an affair, or a disillusioned letter to an America caught in the contradictions of the Vietnam War, or perhaps just an exercise in poetic language. Whatever its meaning, Van Zandt's pained vocal and sparse piano fill it with longing and tenderness. "Andilar" is one of the most atypical tunes in Van Zandt's catalog, a five-minute epic of war and betrayal filled with images of sinking ships, icebergs, battle, and death. Acoustic guitar, a wailing female background chorus, and a sweeping orchestral arrangement give it a cinematic feel, and again it could be about Vietnam, some long forgotten European war, or his own inner turmoil. Whatever the meaning, its scope is cinematic and full of Van Zandt's singular poetry. "Pancho & Lefty," Van Zandt's greatest commercial success, has a folk/pop arrangement with mariachi horns coming in on the coda to give it a Mexican flavor. It's the best rendition of the tune Van Zandt ever cut. "If I Needed You" is purely romantic, one of Van Zandt's most understated love songs, simply sung over a bouncy country rhythm. The album's three covers get made over into Van Zandt's own image. Guy Clarke's "Don't Let the Sunshine Fool Ya" uses pedal steel, female backing vocals, and bluesy guitar to deliver a message that's full of ironic humor. Hank Williams' "Honky Tonkin'" is pure country, with Van Zandt's vocals siding up the scale to crack on the high notes just like Hank Sr used to do. "Fraulein" uses a fiddle to add poignancy to Van Zandt's vocals on this post-WWII tune about a GI's impossible love for a German girl. The album closes with the goofy spiritual "Heavenly Houseboat Blues," that sees Van Zandt sailing down the river Jordan in a slowly sinking silver houseboat. He gargles the last verse with a mouth full of water, ending the set on an odd, giddy note. © j. poet /TiVo
From
HI-RES€14.49
CD€9.99

Country - Released September 4, 2007 | Fat Possum

Hi-Res
From
CD€7.99

Country - Released September 14, 2009 | Domino Recording Co

From
CD€9.99

Country - Released May 17, 2007 | Fat Possum

From
CD€13.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1972 | Capitol Records

In 1972 Van Zandt cut two perfect albums, one of them being High, Low and In Between. Tomato Records' owner Kevin Eggers, who was responsible for many of Van Zandt's best records, produced this album with minimal backing that keeps the spotlight on Van Zandt's vocals and his songwriting. The record includes "To Live Is to Fly," the song Van Zandt considered his best, "No Deal," an absurd hard luck blues, a couple of gospel songs, "Mr. Gold and Mr. Mud," one of his most baffling poetic tunes, and the title track, an aching tale of heartache and confusion. The spare arrangements are as much folk as country, the two genres Van Zandt was most comfortable with. "Two Hands," a rollicking spiritual with bright female backing vocals and tinkling gospel piano opens things up. It's the most straightforward gospel tune Van Zandt ever wrote, full of exuberant joy. "You Are Not Needed Now" radically changes the pace, with its bleak, hopeless message accented by weeping pedal steel and Van Zandt's plaintive vocal. The title track is another forlorn ballad, cut with standup bass and piano providing a sorrowful counterpoint to a vocal that details lost connections, hard work and alienation. It's almost a prayer for salvation, although the lyrics don't shy away from the difficulties of finding comfort in a cold world. "To Live Is to Fly" is another Van Zandt classic, full of the ambivalence that makes his love songs so affecting. Piano and standup bass give the song a gospel feel, while the lyrics address the fleeting nature of love and the loneliness of life on the road. There are two talking blues on the album, "No Deal," which is full of absurd scenarios and Van Zandt's fatalistic humor, and "Mr. Gold and Mr. Mud" a surrealistic tale of a card game between two gamblers with nothing to lose or win, using the language of gambling and poker to describe the struggles of life. Van Zandt crams an amazing amount of brilliant imagery into the songs brief two-minute duration, a performance that's both impressive and impenetrable. "Highway Kind" is a minor-key blues, a brief aching tune in which Van Zandt addresses the perfect lover he's never met while taking full responsibility for his failings and foibles. He sounds so isolated and disconnected from the world that it's hard to listen to. "When He Offers His Hand" is a simple song of faith, without Van Zandt's usual ambivalence or humor, while "Blue Ridge Mountains" is a rewrite of a traditional bluegrass tune that balances spirituality and carnality into its bubbly arrangement. Musically low key, but emotionally potent, High, Low and In Between shows Van Zandt digging deep into his troubled psyche and turning his heartache into soul-stirring art. © j. poet /TiVo
From
HI-RES€14.99
CD€9.99

Country - Released September 7, 2015 | Charly

Hi-Res Booklet
From
CD€9.99

Country - Released October 9, 2020 | Chicken Ranch Records

From
CD€13.99

Country - Released January 1, 1992 | Sugar Hill Records

Steve Earle once said "Townes Van Zandt is the best songwriter in the whole world, and I'll stand on Bob Dylan's coffee table in my cowboy boots and say that." To make such a bold statement, Earle must have had some evidence to back him up. At My Window will suffice as some of that evidence, no doubt. Whether in sweetly tender ballads or honky cowboy ditties, Van Zandt truly wrote of heartache and heartbreak with the best of them. And though his voice lacks the warm honey feel of Lyle Lovett's, he has a down-home, melancholic charm all his own. You need not strain to hear the lonely in his voice. You can so easily picture him sitting by a fire out on a prairie somewhere serenading the full moon. For Van Zandt was of a different breed. In "Buckskin Stallion Blues" he sings "If three and four were seven only, where would that leave one and two?" That's a contemplation for the ages. More a kindred spirit to Hank Williams than Lovett, his life was in his songs. And the world is all the better for that. © Kelly McCartney /TiVo
From
CD€9.99

Country - Released March 11, 2016 | Fat Possum

From
CD€9.99

Country - Released January 1, 1994 | Fat Possum

From
CD€9.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 28, 2020 | TVZ Records - Fat Possum Records

From
CD€9.99

Country - Released May 17, 2007 | Fat Possum

From
CD€9.99

Country - Released November 23, 1994 | Fat Possum

From
CD€9.99

Country - Released July 1, 1999 | Fat Possum

From
CD€9.99

Country - Released March 15, 2019 | Fat Possum

Like his hero Hank Williams, Townes Van Zandt died on January 1. On the first day of 1997, he lost his life to alcohol at 52 years old. Throughout his career, the darkest of all Texan songwriters found his inspiration in the depth of human misery, mental pain, and physical despair. Both cynical and lucid, with a singular and refined style, he always stood as an outlaw in the history of country music. He could juggle with words (death, jail, friendship, alcohol, love) and build his Tower of Babel of despair with a hint of cynicism and humor.  With Sky Blue, released in early 2019, Townes Van Zandt is sending a postcard from heaven. Put together by his family (his widow Jeanene and his children J.T., Will, and Katie Bell), the album features eleven previously unreleased tracks recorded in 1973 by Bill Hedgepeth, a journalist, musician, and friend of Van Zandt. At that time, Van Zandt was living between Texas, Colorado, and a cabin in Franklin, Tennessee. His life was nomadic, and he described his lifestyle in his songs. Often along his travels, Van Zandt stopped to see his friend Hedgepeth in his home studio in Atlanta. There, he recorded songs, worked on older tracks, and sometimes experimented new sounds. All of this is memorialized in Sky Blue. The record features first drafts of classics (Pancho & Lefty and Rex’s Blues, where Van Zandt shines as a master composer and a writer whose simple words and melodies favor his ideas and emotions), and inspired covers of Richard Dobson and Tom Paxton’s song, as well as The Hills of Roane County, a murder ballad from 1880. As the icing of this beautiful cake, the record will please all fans with two unreleased songs: All I Need and Sky Blue. The album is more than enough to remind everyone of the crucial importance of Townes Van Zandt’s legacy… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
From
CD€9.99

Pop - Released January 1, 1993 | Fat Possum

From
CD€7.99

Country - Released September 14, 2009 | Domino Recording Co

From
CD€7.99

Country - Released January 1, 1971 | Domino Recording Co