Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Soul - Released July 27, 1972 | Motown

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CD€14.99

Soul - Released January 1, 1971 | Motown

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Eddie Kendricks said so long to The Temptations on this early-'70s album, with the glorious "Just My Imagination" being his swan song. The song that everyone missed was their lengthy, imaginative version of "Smiling Faces Sometimes," which wasn't a huge hit for them, but became a smash for The Undisputed Truth. Although they were successful with Damon Harris replacing Kendricks, things would never be the same. © Ron Wynn /TiVo
From
CD€20.99

Soul - Released January 1, 2003 | Motown

Two big changes happened for the Temptations in 1968. First, they parted ways with David Ruffin and brought in former Contour Dennis Edwards as lead vocalist. Edwards brought a rougher-edged soul sound to the group with his raw vocals. Secondly, they decided that the world of music was changing and they were standing still. The group went to producer Norman Whitfield and asked for a song that was more in tune with the volatile and psychedelic times. Whitfield came back with the incredible, layered, dense, and still funky "Cloud Nine," the song was a smash, and a new, more progressive era of the Temptations began. The double-disc Psychedelic Soul chronicles the best moments of the incredible union between Whitfield's forward-looking and innovative writing and production and the Temptations' incredible voices. The record picks up the big hits like "Cloud Nine," "I Can't Get Next to You," "Psychedelic Shack" (here in a previously unreleased extended version), "Ball of Confusion" (also here in a previously unreleased extended version), "Masterpiece," and "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone." It also fills in the gaps with a lot of album tracks from records the Temptations made between 1968 and 1973. Some of the highlights are the gripping "Slave," the funky "Hum Along and Dance," the very long and dramatic version of the Undisputed Truth's hit "Smiling Faces Sometimes," the hard-rocking "Ungema Za Ulimengu (Unite the World)," and the dubby, freewheeling "Funky Music Sho Nuff Turns Me On." By the end of disc two, the group slides toward Philly soul, albeit with an angry, political outlook especially on the heartbroken "Ain't No Justice" or the vitriolic "1990" from 1973. This is a well-selected disc that is a fitting testament to the talents of Whitfield and a stunning example of a band reinventing itself. Of course, it is also great funky dance music -- supercharged, psychedelic funky dance music, some of the best music Motown (or anyone) produced in the late '60s/early '70s. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
From
CD€13.99

Soul - Released September 23, 2008 | UNI - MOTOWN

Arguably Motown's longest-running and most consistent act, the Temptations were top-notch, and this single-disc Motown sampler offers plenty of proof of that, including the classic singles "Ain't Too Proud to Beg," "My Girl," "Just My Imagination," "(I Know) I'm Losing You," "Cloud Nine," "Psychedelic Shack," and their dramatic masterpiece, "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone." The songs were always solid, and in spite of the stylistic sea changes of the music industry, the Temptations adapted to the market, continually issuing timeless material, and not many groups could boast a succession of lead singers like David Ruffin, Eddie Kendricks, and Dennis Edwards or producers (and songwriters) like Smokey Robinson and Norman Whitfield. There are several Temptations collections available, but this one presents all the big radio hits, so for most listeners, it'll be just what the doctor ordered. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Soul - Released February 1, 1965 | UNI - MOTOWN

Hi-Res
"..the first great soul concept album.." - Rating: A © TiVo
From
HI-RES€11.99
CD€8.49

Soul - Released January 1, 1966 | Motown

Hi-Res
From
CD€10.99

Soul - Released January 1, 2014 | UNI - MOTOWN

Norman Whitfield was always the Motown producer who had the most daring creative vision for The Temptations; he was the man who helped them turn psychedelic (well, sort of) with "Cloud Nine" and "Psychedelic Shack", and when the group's career had hit a slump in the early 1970's, he brought them back to the top of the charts with the brilliantly realized "Papa Was A Rolling Stone". After the latter tune had become a smash, Whitfield and The Temptations set out to make their most ambitious project to date, but in many ways, Masterpiece sounded more like a Norman Whitfield solo album with the Temps adding occasional vocals; the album's long, carefully layered tunes, complete with sweeping string charts and cleanly punctuated horn lines, have the widescreen splendor of a big-budget movie, and while it's inarguably impressive to hear, the featured artists often seem to be lost in the shuffle. It doesn't help that while the album is musically impressive, several of the songs are lyrically cut-rate, especially the cliche-ridden "Ma" and "Plastic Man", a ho-hum critique of hypocrisy, and while The Temptations deliver their material with conviction and typically peerless vocal skill, it's not enough to disguise the fact this album overshoots its target. While still better than the average Motown effort of the period, Masterpiece never quite becomes the triumph it obviously wants to be, proving once again that a "Masterpiece" usually occurs as a matter of serendipity rather than careful design. © Mark Deming /TiVo
From
HI-RES€15.49
CD€10.99

Soul - Released October 30, 1970 | Motown

Hi-Res
In the world of Motown, no proverbial stone was left unturned and no market untapped. This especially rang true during the holiday season, as yearly the label would flood the record store shelves with holiday records from many of its most popular artists. This Temptations session leads off with their most renowned holiday classic, "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer." Most of the other holiday standards here are easily forgettable and underwhelming. Christmas Card is not as fantastic as Give Love on Christmas Day or any of the other budget-line holiday compilations available from the Temptations, so unless you're a die-hard collector, it might be best to skip this one. © Rob Theakston /TiVo
From
CD€19.49

Soul - Released January 11, 2005 | UNI - MOTOWN

With an onslaught of greatest-hits compilations to their name, finding the ideal Temptations anthology can prove to be a daunting task for the die-hard fan as well as for those simply looking for the hits. Granted, there are several in print that are passable but by no means thorough surveys. And aside from the onslaught of midrange budget-line compilations currently in print, there are also the gigantic box sets and single discs with such titles as Emperors of Soul, Ultimate Collection, and 20th Century Masters to create additional confusion. Equally as baffling is the title of this compilation, simply called Gold. While it covers the bases and includes many of the group's finest moments ("My Girl," "Ain't Too Proud to Beg," "I Wish It Would Rain," "Papa Was a Rolling Stone"), it also overlooks some of their more obscure and mildly popular numbers of the '60s (including their duets with longtime friends and labelmates the Supremes) in deference to including easily forgettable songs from the '80s and '90s, which more often than not do not have original members in the lineup. With insightful and enjoyable liner notes from original Temp Otis Williams, it's a solid look at the history of the group but by no means a definitive one. © Rob Theakston /TiVo
From
HI-RES€15.49
CD€10.99

Soul - Released January 1, 1970 | Motown

Hi-Res
With everything the Temptations released pretty much guaranteed to turn to gold, not to mention platinum, even their tripped-out forays into sweet '60s psychedelic experimentation were sure to fire a string of hits. 1970's Norman Whitfield-produced Psychedelic Shack -- while perhaps a system shock to those fans who grooved to the band's lame-suited, Motown dance-routined R&B classics -- was a magnificent stretch into an epic that ultimately emerged as another in a long line of enduring sets. Deviating from form across the first songs, it was with the whimsical and willful title track (and a big thanks to the band from Georgia retro-ists the B-52's, who took their own homage, "Love Shack," to the top of the charts in 1989) that the Temptations broke their own mold with the acid-drenched party chant: "Psychedelic shack/That's where it's at." Opening that door and venturing outside the nonstop celebration, the band retains that vibe while returning to a slightly more staid stance on "Hum Along and Dance," leaving both the oddly paced "You Make Your Own Heaven and Hell Right Here on Earth" and the totally tripped-out "Take a Stroll Thru Your Mind" out on their own plane entirely. With such a strong collection of songs, it couldn't get much better than that. But, of course, it does, as the Temptations blister through the groovers "It's Summer" and "Friendship Train." And that, of course, just leaves the Whitfield-penned classic "War" to round out the mix. While fellow Motown-er Edwin Starr has etched what is now considered to be the definitive version of the song into the history tablets, the Temptations certainly took their own inspiration and added a unique spin as well. Not much else can be said, except that this is an absolutely outstanding album -- one which has stood the test of time, sounding as fresh as it did upon initial release. © Amy Hanson /TiVo
From
HI-RES€13.49
CD€9.99

Soul - Released August 14, 1980 | Motown

Hi-Res
This is one of the most classic R&B Christmas albums ever recorded; the Temptations come steppin' in prime form. With a chiming introduction, "Give Love on Christmas Day" is an uplifting jingle showcasing Glenn Leonard's unwavering falsetto on lead. "Everything for Christmas" has mellifluous background vocals, with string and horn arrangements rounded out by Richard Street's indelible delivery. "The Christmas Song" and "Silent Night" are two incomparable selections featuring various members on lead, including Melvin Franklin's admirable bass exhibition. Dennis Edwards shines on the jubilant "This Christmas," which also features a spirited musical interlude. In minimal words, this collection of Christmas carols ranks among the best. © Craig Lytle /TiVo
From
CD€13.99

Soul - Released January 1, 1969 | UNI - MOTOWN

Both The Temptations and producer Norman Whitfield were at the top of their form with 1969's Puzzle People, which captures the group in the midst of their rock-influenced "socially conscious" period. While the lead-off cut, "I Can't Get Next To You", was a potent R&B dance-floor filler, elsewhere the album was dotted with "relevant" tunes such as "Message From A Black Man" (not nearly as militant as it sounds), "Don't Let The Joneses Get You Down", and the "life-in-prison" epic "Slave", complete with plenty of fuzztone and wah-wah and enough panning to make George Clinton dizzy. But while the material and the production is a bit dated, Whitfield and his crew certainly caught The Funk Brothers on a great run when they cut these sessions, with the musicians blending the swagger and confidence of rock with a soundly funky undertow and chops to spare. And as for the Temptations themselves, if new lead vocalist Dennis Edwards lacked the elan of David Ruffin, he had power to spare, and the group's harmonies and shared vocals found room for both smooth precision and streetwise grit. While short on hits past the opening track (and padded with well-executed but hardly essential covers of "Hey Jude" and "Little Green Apples", Puzzle People is still the work of a great vocal group firing on all cylinders and getting inspired support in the studio, and it's one of the group's strongest late-60's efforts. © Mark Deming /TiVo
From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Soul - Released May 4, 2018 | UME Direct

Hi-Res
On their first studio album in eight years, the Temptations revert to covers, as they did with multiple full-lengths earlier in the 2000s. This time, the group, still led by lone original member Otis Williams, selects mostly contemporary material. They do so with mixed results, excelling with imaginative takes on Maxwell's "Pretty Wings," Sam Smith's "Stay with Me," and John Mayer's "When I Was Your Man," pouncing on the opportunity to accentuate the latter's allusion to the work of Motown peer Marvin Gaye. A busy version of Michael Jackson's "Remember the Time" involves ill-fitting elements like "Papa Was a Rolling Stone"-evoking handclaps and gleaming synthesizers, while the Weeknd's "Earned It" is a creative risk not worth taking. "Waitin' on You" is the best of the few originals, easily mistakable for a (cleaned-up) take on a Jaheim hit. With each cover choice popularized by a solo artist, the set is a subtle reminder that vocal groups are nearly extinct. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
CD€14.99

Soul - Released July 27, 1972 | UNI - MOTOWN

A monster album, the one that put them back in the spotlight and signaled that Norman Whitfield had saved the day. Damon Harris had replaced Eddie Kendricks, and there were many doubters convinced the band was finished. Instead, Whitfield revitalized them via the majestic single, "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone." Despite its length, Whitfield's decision to open with an extensive, multi-layered musical suite and tease listeners was a master stroke. By the time Dennis Edwards' voice came rushing in, no one would dare turn it off. The single, as well as "Law of the Land" and others, ended the funeral arrangements that had been prepared for the Temptations. © Ron Wynn /TiVo
From
CD€13.99

Soul - Released January 1, 2004 | Motown

This is another entry in the 21st century British two-on-one reissues of the Temptations' classic albums. These are two of the most unalike of all of the group's albums, and also a completely natural pairing -- In a Mellow Mood was the Temptations' effort, urged by Berry Gordy, to push their sound toward an adult audience, while its immediate follow-up, Wish It Would Rain, was a return to their soul repertoire just a few months later, the prior album having done its job by getting them a much-sought gig at New York's Copacabana. Perhaps in deference to the tastes of most fans, the more soulful Wish It Would Rain tracks come first on this CD, and these are ear-opening in this new edition -- one even gets a sense of the action on the bells in the introduction of "Gonna Give Her All the Love I've Got," and the voices of David Ruffin and Eddie Kendricks (and even Melvin Franklin in his basso showcase "I Truly, Truly Believe") are so close that the singers seem like they're in the same room with you. In a Mellow Mood fits together chronologically with its successor, but the musical textures between the two sets of recordings are so different that they're jarring to hear at first. This material -- for which the group had a genuine affinity -- has a bigger, more booming sound and, with a couple of exceptions, is nowhere near as exciting as the companion volume. The vocals are impressive for their virtuosity, however, and Paul Williams' rendition of "The Impossible Dream," in particular, benefits from the clean, sharp mastering of this edition, which only brings out greater radiance in the singing. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
From
HI-RES€13.49
CD€9.99

Soul - Released January 16, 1975 | Motown

Hi-Res
By 1975, the Temptations were a much different group with both David Ruffin and Eddie Kendricks out of the lineup. Dennis Edwards was now singing lead, and only Melvin Franklin and Otis Williams existed from the original group. The group was far more of a funk mind, and this set proves it. The big hit on here was "Happy People," with the Temps backed up by the Commodores, listed as "the Temptations Band" on the second part instrumental version. For ultra-funk, though, it's hard to beat "Glasshouse" and "Shakey Ground," which features guitar and bass work from P-Funk alumni Eddie Hazel and Billy Nelson. But they didn't leave their ballads entirely in the good old days, as the satin-drenched "Firefly," "Memories" and the title track clearly show. Produced by Jeffrey Bowen, this thing has "'70s'" stamped all over it. In the case of the Temps, that's good. © Cub Koda /TiVo
From
CD€14.99

Soul - Released August 31, 1999 | UNI - MOTOWN

Like most entries in Universal Music's Millennium Collection (previously the province of MCA Records), The Best of Temptations, Vol. 1: The '60s is a solid budget-line collection containing 11 of their biggest hits from the '60s, including "My Girl," "I Can't Get Next to You," "Ain't to Proud to Beg," and "The Way You Do the Things You Do." There may be a few hits missing and serious listeners will probably like a more extensive compilation, but this is nevertheless an excellent bargain for its price. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD€14.99

Soul - Released July 17, 1967 | UNI - MOTOWN

This was the Temptations' seventh hit album in a row, released as Gordy 922 in July of 1967. It shows them -- and the Motown Sound -- moving in a more modern direction. Sporting the hits "(I Know) I'm Losing You" and "All I Need," it also features some first-rate vocal exchanges between Eddie Kendricks and David Ruffin on "You're My Everything." Other highlights include the Smokey Robinson-written and -produced "Don't Send Me Away," "Now That You've Won Me" and "No More Water In the Well," plus Ivy Jo Hunter's "Sorry Is a Sorry Word," while Norman Whitfield checks in for six of the production credits on here, especially effective on "Loneliness Made Me Realize) It's You That I Need" and "Two Sides to Love." Considered by many to be their best recording of the '60s, this is a very strong addition to anyone's Motown/R&B/soul music collection. © Cub Koda /TiVo
From
CD€14.99

Soul - Released October 30, 2001 | Motown

The Temptations' 20th Century Masters - Christmas Collection combines 12 tunes initially available on 1970's Christmas Card and 1980's Give Love at Christmas, both on Motown. This is a pleasing combination of classics of the genre -- "Silver Bells," "White Christmas," and "Let It Snow" -- with not so classic but still highly enjoyable tunes, including "This Christmas," co-written by the late Donny Hathaway, and Smokey Robinson's composition "Christmas Everyday." Also of interest to collectors will be the unreleased bonus version of "Oh Holy Night," originally intended for Give Love at Christmas. © Al Campbell /TiVo
From
CD€9.99

Soul - Released August 14, 2015 | MD Fuel Records