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€16.99

Electro - Released August 4, 2008 | XL Recordings

€16.99

Electro - Released October 17, 2005 | XL Recordings

€14.99

Electro - Released November 10, 2015 | Take Me To The Hospital

€14.99

Electro - Released November 8, 2009 | Take Me To The Hospital

€13.99

Electro - Released June 30, 1997 | XL Recordings

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Electro - Released April 4, 1994 | XL Recordings

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Electro - Released September 21, 1992 | XL Recordings

One of the few noncompilation rave albums of any worth, Experience balances a supply of top-this siren whistles and chipmunk divas with Liam Howlett's surprising flair for constructing track after track of intense breakbeat techno. Almost every song sounds like a potential chart-topper (circa 1992, of course) while the true singles "Your Love," "Charly," "Music Reach," and "Out of Space" add that extra bit of energy to the fray. More than just a relic of the rave experience, Experience shows the Prodigy near the peak of their game from the get-go. ~ John Bush
€13.99

Electro - Released October 17, 2005 | XL Recordings

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Electro - Released December 3, 2012 | XL

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€11.49

Electro - Released November 2, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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"Change? Never. You can evolve, add things, but why would you want to change? What’s the point?" Liam Howlett, the brains behind The Prodigy, was very clear in 2015 upon the release of The Day is My Enemy, the last album from the British group who created a fierce mix of techno, jungle, punk and hip-hop know as big beat at the start of the 90s. This new album confirms that the trio still don’t plan on straying from their path, the path of making infernal noise with the objective of blowing up the stage. Mutant synth gimmicks, motor engine-like noise, brutal bass-lines, punchy intros, thrashing guitars: like all Prodigy albums No Tourists is like running through a blitz. Partly put together in hotel rooms, the album also includes a collaboration with New Jersey punk-rap duo Ho99o9 on the track Fight Fire with Fire, a riot rallying call on which Howlett dives deep into the hardcore. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
€11.49

Electro - Released November 2, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

"Change? Never. You can evolve, add things, but why would you want to change? What’s the point?" Liam Howlett, the brains behind The Prodigy, was very clear in 2015 upon the release of The Day is My Enemy, the last album from the British group who created a fierce mix of techno, jungle, punk and hip-hop know as big beat at the start of the 90s. This new album confirms that the trio still don’t plan on straying from their path, the path of making infernal noise with the objective of blowing up the stage. Mutant synth gimmicks, motor engine-like noise, brutal bass-lines, punchy intros, thrashing guitars: like all Prodigy albums No Tourists is like running through a blitz. Partly put together in hotel rooms, the album also includes a collaboration with New Jersey punk-rap duo Ho99o9 on the track Fight Fire with Fire, a riot rallying call on which Howlett dives deep into the hardcore. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
€9.99

Electro - Released February 23, 2009 | Take Me To The Hospital

Twenty years after England's Summer of Love, rave had made a comeback -- at least in indie circles -- and Liam Howlett's Prodigy, the only original rave group still going (anyone remember Altern-8?), could hardly have done worse than jump aboard. But Invaders Must Die is a curious nu-rave record, as though the sound of 1991 (such as their Top Ten hit "Charly") has been filtered through the sound of 1996 (such as their number one, "Firestarter") to emerge as nothing more than a hodgepodge of uptempo dance music with extroverted beats and grimy basslines. If that sounds basically like your average electronica record circa the turn of the millennium (albeit produced by one of its greatest heroes), then you're a long way towards understanding what this nu-rave record from the Prodigy sounds like. Add a few period-appropriate cues -- unfiltered synth or keyboard runs, ring-the-alarm effects, samples of divas or ragga chatters (sped-up and slowed-down, respectively) -- and you get a strange album indeed. The single "Omen" is a good example, although it has few qualities to recommend it beyond its basic energy; tellingly, it's a rare co-production, with James Rushent from Does It Offend You, Yeah?. The other two tracks with the most rave signals are "Take Me to the Hospital" and "Warrior's Dance," which both sound like follow-ups to "Charly" or "Out of Space" filtered through the darkside strains of latter-day hardcore techno (aka 4Hero's "Mr. Kirk's Nightmare"). And as usual with the Prodigy -- going back to Music for the Jilted Generation -- there's plenty of polemics and struggle, most of it delivered in shouted, sloganeering fashion by Keith Flint and Maxim (who are both back in the fold after being absent from the previous Prodigy record, Always Outnumbered, Never Outgunned). Howlett is no slouch in the production chair, and the sounds are mostly blinding, but the songs are strictly by-the-books. ~ John Bush
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€9.99

Electro - Released March 30, 2015 | Take Me To The Hospital

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Electro - Released May 22, 2011 | Take Me To The Hospital

The Prodigy have been the most galvanizing live act in dance music for nearly as long as some of their present-day fans have been alive: from the early Experience days in the early '90s through "Firestarter" and right into the new millennium via Invaders Must Die, their 2009 return to form. Still, World's on Fire is their first official live recording. (Canny listeners might actually think the world’s on fire after a few minutes of listening to Maxim and Keith Flint’s nearly endless commands to the crowd -- "Stand up!," "Make some no-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-ise!" -- but they were on solid ground with fans, since this was the Prodigy's own Warrior's Dance festival at the Milton Keynes Bowl in July 2010.) All the hits are in attendance, spread throughout each major era, although most of the earliest and best come later, including the ending trifecta of "Everybody in the Place," "Their Law," and "Out of Space." The energy on display is impressive, and it's hardly a bad keepsake of actually seeing Howlett & co. in action, but as usual for live albums from dance acts, there are few substitutes for the real thing. [A video on the CD/DVD edition includes the full show as well as other live highlights, including an excellent selection of tracks from all over the world as well as short tour films from Japan, the U.S., and the U.K.] ~ John Bush
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Electro - Released November 8, 2009 | Take Me To The Hospital

€6.93

Electro - Released August 31, 2009 | Take Me To The Hospital

€5.94

Electro - Released May 11, 2009 | Take Me To The Hospital

€7.45
€4.95

Electro - Released July 31, 2015 | Take Me To The Hospital

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Electro - Released May 11, 2009 | Take Me To The Hospital

€3.96

Electro - Released February 16, 2009 | Take Me To The Hospital

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The Prodigy in the magazine
  • Another Blitz
    Another Blitz "Change? Never. You can evolve, add things, but why would you want to change? What’s the point?"