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Electro - Released December 3, 2012 | XL Recordings

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Electro - Released November 2, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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"Change? Never. You can evolve, add things, but why would you want to change? What’s the point?" Liam Howlett, the brains behind The Prodigy, was very clear in 2015 upon the release of The Day is My Enemy, the last album from the British group who created a fierce mix of techno, jungle, punk and hip-hop know as big beat at the start of the 90s. This new album confirms that the trio still don’t plan on straying from their path, the path of making infernal noise with the objective of blowing up the stage. Mutant synth gimmicks, motor engine-like noise, brutal bass-lines, punchy intros, thrashing guitars: like all Prodigy albums No Tourists is like running through a blitz. Partly put together in hotel rooms, the album also includes a collaboration with New Jersey punk-rap duo Ho99o9 on the track Fight Fire with Fire, a riot rallying call on which Howlett dives deep into the hardcore. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Electro - Released February 23, 2009 | Take Me To The Hospital

Twenty years after England's Summer of Love, rave had made a comeback -- at least in indie circles -- and Liam Howlett's Prodigy, the only original rave group still going (anyone remember Altern-8?), could hardly have done worse than jump aboard. But Invaders Must Die is a curious nu-rave record, as though the sound of 1991 (such as their Top Ten hit "Charly") has been filtered through the sound of 1996 (such as their number one, "Firestarter") to emerge as nothing more than a hodgepodge of uptempo dance music with extroverted beats and grimy basslines. If that sounds basically like your average electronica record circa the turn of the millennium (albeit produced by one of its greatest heroes), then you're a long way towards understanding what this nu-rave record from the Prodigy sounds like. Add a few period-appropriate cues -- unfiltered synth or keyboard runs, ring-the-alarm effects, samples of divas or ragga chatters (sped-up and slowed-down, respectively) -- and you get a strange album indeed. The single "Omen" is a good example, although it has few qualities to recommend it beyond its basic energy; tellingly, it's a rare co-production, with James Rushent from Does It Offend You, Yeah?. The other two tracks with the most rave signals are "Take Me to the Hospital" and "Warrior's Dance," which both sound like follow-ups to "Charly" or "Out of Space" filtered through the darkside strains of latter-day hardcore techno (aka 4Hero's "Mr. Kirk's Nightmare"). And as usual with the Prodigy -- going back to Music for the Jilted Generation -- there's plenty of polemics and struggle, most of it delivered in shouted, sloganeering fashion by Keith Flint and Maxim (who are both back in the fold after being absent from the previous Prodigy record, Always Outnumbered, Never Outgunned). Howlett is no slouch in the production chair, and the sounds are mostly blinding, but the songs are strictly by-the-books. ~ John Bush
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Electro - Released November 2, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

"Change? Never. You can evolve, add things, but why would you want to change? What’s the point?" Liam Howlett, the brains behind The Prodigy, was very clear in 2015 upon the release of The Day is My Enemy, the last album from the British group who created a fierce mix of techno, jungle, punk and hip-hop know as big beat at the start of the 90s. This new album confirms that the trio still don’t plan on straying from their path, the path of making infernal noise with the objective of blowing up the stage. Mutant synth gimmicks, motor engine-like noise, brutal bass-lines, punchy intros, thrashing guitars: like all Prodigy albums No Tourists is like running through a blitz. Partly put together in hotel rooms, the album also includes a collaboration with New Jersey punk-rap duo Ho99o9 on the track Fight Fire with Fire, a riot rallying call on which Howlett dives deep into the hardcore. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz

Electro - Released August 4, 2008 | XL Recordings

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Electro - Released July 19, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Electro - Released November 10, 2015 | Take Me To The Hospital

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Electro - Released June 30, 1997 | XL Recordings

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Electro - Released March 30, 2015 | Take Me To The Hospital

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Electro - Released April 4, 1994 | XL Recordings

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Electro - Released August 4, 2008 | XL Recordings

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Electro - Released November 8, 2009 | Take Me To The Hospital

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Electro - Released October 17, 2005 | XL Recordings

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Electro - Released July 1, 2002 | XL Recordings

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Electro - Released November 11, 1996 | XL Recordings

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Electro - Released March 15, 1996 | XL Recordings

"...`Firestarter' may break through American commercial radio's staid aversion to all things techno....the instrumental `Molotov Bitch' gets scientifically funky on your ass, so purchase is a good idea..."
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Electro - Released May 22, 2011 | Take Me To The Hospital

The Prodigy have been the most galvanizing live act in dance music for nearly as long as some of their present-day fans have been alive: from the early Experience days in the early '90s through "Firestarter" and right into the new millennium via Invaders Must Die, their 2009 return to form. Still, World's on Fire is their first official live recording. (Canny listeners might actually think the world’s on fire after a few minutes of listening to Maxim and Keith Flint’s nearly endless commands to the crowd -- "Stand up!," "Make some no-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-ise!" -- but they were on solid ground with fans, since this was the Prodigy's own Warrior's Dance festival at the Milton Keynes Bowl in July 2010.) All the hits are in attendance, spread throughout each major era, although most of the earliest and best come later, including the ending trifecta of "Everybody in the Place," "Their Law," and "Out of Space." The energy on display is impressive, and it's hardly a bad keepsake of actually seeing Howlett & co. in action, but as usual for live albums from dance acts, there are few substitutes for the real thing. [A video on the CD/DVD edition includes the full show as well as other live highlights, including an excellent selection of tracks from all over the world as well as short tour films from Japan, the U.S., and the U.K.] ~ John Bush
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Electro - Released November 8, 2009 | Take Me To The Hospital

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Electro - Released November 5, 2012 | XL Recordings

Prodigy's third single off the double-platinum Fat of the Land album features their most controversial and confrontational track. Many feminist groups and conservatives have been rubbed the wrong way by the song title "Smack My Bitch Up," but the band has stated in the press that the title shouldn't be taken literally (Prodigy leader Liam Howlett described the title as a phrase that the band uses that means "to hit the concert stage"). The song, however, just happens to be one of Prodigy's finest, featuring swirling rhythms under the repeated title. The track is featured two times on the single, first as a radio edit (similar to the album version), and as a DJ Hype remix (reworked by the well-known U.K. DJ as a speedy jungle track). None other than Liam Howlett does the "Headrock" remix of "Mindfields," and replaces the original's slight Middle Eastern influence with straight-ahead dance beats. But the most interesting track on the "Smack My Bitch Up" single is a collaboration between Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello and Howlett, titled "No Man Army." This non-album dance-rocker features repetitive Morello guitar riffs and fills, often compressed or filtered through a wah-wah pedal. This infectious single is another winner from the most imaginative and original electronic dance group today. ~ Greg Prato
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Electro - Released August 31, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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The Prodigy in the magazine
  • Another Blitz
    Another Blitz "Change? Never. You can evolve, add things, but why would you want to change? What’s the point?"