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Rock - Released October 17, 2011 | Parlophone UK

Barely causing a ripple upon its 1988 release, Sunshine on Leith, the second album by Edinburgh's the Proclaimers, received new life five years down the road when the infectious "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)" became a fluke hit following its inclusion on the soundtrack to Benny & Joon. Although nothing else on the album quite matches that Top Ten's energy or quirky charm, the duo's (twin brothers Charlie and Craig Reid) sophomore effort still manages to be a highly listenable and thoroughly engaging blend of folk and pop with several nods to their Scottish heritage. Many of the lyrics touch upon the subject of domestic and familial bliss as on "Then I Met You"; the jaunty, wide-eyed wonder of "Sean"; and the lovely, waltz-like title track (featuring some gorgeous harmonies). There's a thread of optimism that runs through most of the album only broken on the few occasions when the two stray from the comforts of home and hearth (as on "What Do You Do"). Other standout tracks include the upbeat swagger of "I'm On My Way" and the steel-guitar twang of their cover of Steve Earle's "My Old Friend the Blues." © Tom Demalon /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 6, 1993 | Parlophone UK

Barely causing a ripple upon its 1988 release, Sunshine on Leith, the second album by Edinburgh's the Proclaimers, received new life five years down the road when the infectious "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)" became a fluke hit following its inclusion on the soundtrack to Benny & Joon. Although nothing else on the album quite matches that Top Ten's energy or quirky charm, the duo's (twin brothers Charlie and Craig Reid) sophomore effort still manages to be a highly listenable and thoroughly engaging blend of folk and pop with several nods to their Scottish heritage. Many of the lyrics touch upon the subject of domestic and familial bliss as on "Then I Met You"; the jaunty, wide-eyed wonder of "Sean"; and the lovely, waltz-like title track (featuring some gorgeous harmonies). There's a thread of optimism that runs through most of the album only broken on the few occasions when the two stray from the comforts of home and hearth (as on "What Do You Do"). Other standout tracks include the upbeat swagger of "I'm On My Way" and the steel-guitar twang of their cover of Steve Earle's "My Old Friend the Blues." © Tom Demalon /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 13, 2002 | Parlophone UK

Since the Scottish Reid brothers' existing catalog consisted of four good but spotty albums as of this compilation's release in 2002, The Best of the Proclaimers is not only a near-perfect summary of their most significant songs, but is the only purchase any but die-hard fans will need. The 20-track collection runs 70 minutes and not only includes music from all of their albums, but additionally three new tunes recorded expressly for this release. Given that the brothers' style didn't alter substantially over the course of the 14-year span covered here, the non-chronological presentation works to the advantage of the listener. Of the new tunes, a cover of Frankie Miller's obscure "The Doodle Song" hits the mark in a rearranged version; "Ghost of Love" sounds like a great, lost Everly Brothers' ballad; and "Lady Luck" is a mid-tempo pop song that brings out their most soulful side. "I'm Going to Be (500 Miles)" was the duo's only big hit, yet the disc is valuable because it unearths excellent tracks that had been hidden on their uneven albums. In particular, "The Light" and "What Makes You Cry" from the underheard Hit the Highway release are well worth consideration for those who enjoy the Proclaimers' stomping folk-pop sound. Their version of Roger Miller's "King of the Road" is also a nifty and surprising addition. The sound is excellent, and the sequencing is well thought out, which results in a superb representation of the band, as well as a near faultless compilation. It makes the rest of their catalog necessary for completists only. [In 2007, an accompanying DVD called Best of 1987-2002 was issued.] © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Pop - Released July 1, 2013 | Parlophone UK

Handpicked by charismatic, bespectacled Scottish siblings Craig and Charlie Reid, the 30 tracks that make up this two-disc greatest-hits compilation represent the cream of the crop from all nine of the Proclaimers' studio albums, from 1987's gutsy, stripped-down This Is the Story to 2012's sugary and infinitely more settled Like Comedy. Listeners who recoil upon hearing the churning, palm-muted guitar line that opens their most notable pop culture offering, 1988's near perfect folk-pop earworm "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)," will retreat into the shadows even further at the thought of enduring nearly two hours of like-minded whimsy, but longtime fans, many of whom consider tracks like "Sunshine on Leith," "Letter from America," "Throw the 'R' Away," and "Oh Jean" to be far superior examples of why the Reid brothers are so beloved, both at home and abroad, will thrill to the idea of having almost (where is the magnificent "Over & Done With"?) all of their favorites, many of which have been remastered, together in one place. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Released February 28, 2003 | Parlophone UK

Since the Scottish Reid brothers' existing catalog consisted of four good but spotty albums as of this compilation's release in 2002, The Best of the Proclaimers is not only a near-perfect summary of their most significant songs, but is the only purchase any but die-hard fans will need. The 20-track collection runs 70 minutes and not only includes music from all of their albums, but additionally three new tunes recorded expressly for this release. Given that the brothers' style didn't alter substantially over the course of the 14-year span covered here, the non-chronological presentation works to the advantage of the listener. Of the new tunes, a cover of Frankie Miller's obscure "The Doodle Song" hits the mark in a rearranged version; "Ghost of Love" sounds like a great, lost Everly Brothers' ballad; and "Lady Luck" is a mid-tempo pop song that brings out their most soulful side. "I'm Going to Be (500 Miles)" was the duo's only big hit, yet the disc is valuable because it unearths excellent tracks that had been hidden on their uneven albums. In particular, "The Light" and "What Makes You Cry" from the underheard Hit the Highway release are well worth consideration for those who enjoy the Proclaimers' stomping folk-pop sound. Their version of Roger Miller's "King of the Road" is also a nifty and surprising addition. The sound is excellent, and the sequencing is well thought out, which results in a superb representation of the band, as well as a near faultless compilation. It makes the rest of their catalog necessary for completists only. [In 2007, an accompanying DVD called Best of 1987-2002 was issued.] © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 10, 2018 | Cooking Vinyl

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Rock - Released September 1, 2003 | Parlophone UK

Capitol's 2002 Best of the Proclaimers did a fine job compiling the spotty -- but occasionally brilliant -- Scottish duo's most memorable tracks, so when something like EMI's Finest arrives, it can only be met with the kind of skepticism reserved for insurance salesmen and snake-oil peddlers. The decision to omit absolutely essential tracks like "Over and Done With," "Letter from America," "Oh Jean," and "Throw the 'R' Away" -- the latter is represented by its decidedly less impressive B-side, "A Train Went Past My Window" -- must have something to do with licensing, because with only "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)" to do the barking, this collection has little to offer even the most casual of Proclaimers fans. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 17, 2011 | Parlophone UK

4 stars out of 5 -- "[L]argely acoustic...[with] lyrically-taut social history and beautifully constructed love songs." © TiVo

Pop - Released August 1, 1988 | Rhino

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Rock - Released July 1, 1990 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released April 6, 2010 | Savoy

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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Sometimes a band finds its career virtually on hold. The Proclaimers had enjoyed a couple of major hit albums and especially two very memorable hit singles in the 1980s, "Letter from America" and "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)," but the hits dried up and the two identical twins Charlie and Craig Reid had carried on regardless, churning out their unique brand of guitar-based folk-rock with witty and clever lyrics. In fact, their previous three albums had all failed to reach the Top 60 in the album charts and only a belated compilation, The Best Of..., released in 2002, brought them briefly back to the Top 30. Then in 2007 their song "I'm Gonna Be" was chosen by the team behind the Comic Relief charity as the unofficial single (the official one being the Girls Aloud-Sugababes collaboration "Walk This Way"), and just like two years previously, it was the unofficial song that captured the public imagination and became the bigger hit, in fact reaching number one on the singles chart for three weeks in the spring. The Best Of... was quickly reissued and became their biggest album to date, and while the iron was hot, the twins released their seventh studio album, Life with You, which was produced by Steve Evans, who had previously worked with the Waterboys. The trademark Proclaimers sound was still there, including the finger-snapping opening title track, the staccato guitar that introduces "In Recognition," and the thoughtful lyrics, discussing religion on "New Religion" and "If There's a God." There was also misogynistic gangsta rap rhyming and swearing on "Here It Comes Again," and they didn't forget their roots, producing a faithful cover of the Wreckless Eric song "Whole Wide World." © Sharon Mawer /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 27, 2015 | Cooking Vinyl

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Rock - Released October 17, 2011 | Parlophone UK

After six years, The Proclaimers delivered their third album. While it was a strong record with many fine songs, it lacked a knockout single. Consequently, the duo wasn't able to follow through on the success of "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)." © David Jehnzen /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2000 | Parlophone UK

After six years, The Proclaimers delivered their third album. While it was a strong record with many fine songs, it lacked a knockout single. Consequently, the duo wasn't able to follow through on the success of "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)." © David Jehnzen /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Released June 15, 2009 | Savoy

The Proclaimers, who will forever have fans who only show up to shows to hear the inevitable "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)" encore, have quietly amassed an impressive canon of material since their 1987 debut. Some may have (unfairly) tossed the duo into the "one-hit wonder" pile after the success of its signature hit, but brothers Craig and Charlie Reid have managed to outlive their initial burst of fame and settle into a sustainable career that consistently produces album after album of the kind of amiable adult alternative pop/rock that brings lesser acts riches. Released in 2009, Notes & Rhymes is textbook Proclaimers, utilizing the template of two or three rockers, a couple of covers, and a whole lot of heartfelt balladry. The brothers' signature blend of R&B, country, soul, and folk filtered through two of the thickest Scottish brogues in modern music is just as charming (or grating, depending on which camp you reside in) as it was in the late '80s, and songs like "Love Can Move Mountains," "Just Look Now," and "On Causewayside" prove that the siblings have lost none of their wit and warmth. While 2003's Born Innocent remains the outfit's best (and most diverse) late-period release to date, Notes & Rhymes chimes in at a not so distant second. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 6, 2012 | Cooking Vinyl

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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

The Proclaimers, who will forever have fans who only show up to shows to hear the inevitable "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)" encore, have quietly amassed an impressive canon of material since their 1987 debut. Some may have (unfairly) tossed the duo into the "one-hit wonder" pile after the success of its signature hit, but brothers Craig and Charlie Reid have managed to outlive their initial burst of fame and settle into a sustainable career that consistently produces album after album of the kind of amiable adult alternative pop/rock that brings lesser acts riches. Released in 2009, Notes & Rhymes is textbook Proclaimers, utilizing the template of two or three rockers, a couple of covers, and a whole lot of heartfelt balladry. The brothers' signature blend of R&B, country, soul, and folk filtered through two of the thickest Scottish brogues in modern music is just as charming (or grating, depending on which camp you reside in) as it was in the late '80s, and songs like "Love Can Move Mountains," "Just Look Now," and "On Causewayside" prove that the siblings have lost none of their wit and warmth. While 2003's Born Innocent remains the outfit's best (and most diverse) late-period release to date, Notes & Rhymes chimes in at a not so distant second. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 27, 2018 | Cooking Vinyl Limited

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