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R&B - Released January 1, 2008 | UNI - MOTOWN

The Definitive Collection delivers 18 essential tracks by the Marvelettes, spanning seven years on Motown Records. Though the songs aren't in chronological order, all of the important hits from that era are represented, from their first number one, "Please Mr. Postman" in 1961, through their last chart entry, "My Baby Must Be a Magician" in 1968. Also peppered throughout are strong lesser-heard tracks like "Someday, Someway," "Strange I Know," and "Too Strong to be Strung Along." While not as generous as the 25-track Ultimate Collection on Motown, it's convenient to have all the original hits on one disc. © Al Campbell /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 28, 2013 | Soul Story

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Pop - Released June 23, 2009 | Hip-O Select

Hip-O Select's 2009 triple-disc set Forever: The Complete Motown Albums, Vol. 1 rounds up all the LPs the Marvelettes released between 1961 and 1963 -- 1961's Please Mr. Postman, The Marvelettes Sing, and Playboy both released in 1962, 1963's The Marvelous Marvelettes, and On Stage: Recorded Live -- plus the stereo version of 1966's Greatest Hits and a bunch of mono singles and rarities. The Vol. 1 in the set signals that the Marvelettes had a second run at Motown later in the decade, highlighted by the this "The Hunter Gets Captured by the Game" and "My Baby Must Be a Magician," but this has everything from the band's prime period, running from 1961 to 1965, the time when they rivaled the Supremes as the greatest girl group Motown had to offer. That rivalry wasn't merely commercial but creative, too, with their very best singles -- "Please Mr. Postman," "Beechwood 4-5789," "Too Many Fish in the Sea," "Danger: Heartbreak Dead Ahead" -- holding their own with the Supremes, but the revelation of Forever: The Complete Motown Albums, Vol. 1 is that the trio had a consistent catalog, sounding beguiling when they covered hits by Clyde McPhatter ("Lover Please") and Roy Orbison ("Dream Baby") and benefiting tremendously from Motown's deep songwriting bench, cutting lots of tunes from Smokey Robinson, Norman Whitfield, Brian Holland, and Lamont Dozier and Berry Gordy, many of them never turning into hits but existing as strong examples of the label's craft. If anything, this set is a testament to the power of Motown's assembly line, with the writers, producers, and musicians working steadily, always attempting to better their last effort, always blessed by the harmonies and the charisma of the Marvelettes, a group that may have lacked the magnetism of the Supremes but compensated by their girl-next-door charm, something that shines through all three discs of this set. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 1991 | UNI - MOTOWN

Clearly the focus of Please Mr. Postman (1961) -- the Marvelettes' debut long-player -- is the title track. However, fans of the early Motown sound will be interested not only in the vocalists' soulful and swinging leads, but contributions from burgeoning songwriters Berry Gordy, William "Smokey" Robinson, and Brian Holland as well. Although the Marvelettes personnel changed several times during their early-'60s prime, the lineup featured here includes co-leads Gladys Horton (vocals) and Wanda Young (vocals), along with Georgeanna Tillman (vocals), Katherine Anderson (vocals), and Juanita Cowart (vocals). By the time this album became available in late 1961, three months had passed since "Please Mr. Postman" concluded its seven-week run atop the R&B singles chart. In the interim, the record label mined the ladies' talent for a suitable follow-up. The closest to hail from the bunch would be the midtempo Wall of Sound-alike "I Want a Guy" which was relegated to the B-side of their next single, "Twistin' Postman." That certainly isn't to intimate the remainder of the effort is subpar, but rather that lightening had yet to strike twice as Motown was continually refining the label's sound. The uptempo "Angel" is clearly rooted in then-recent R&B styles with more than a passing resemblance to another successful all-girl group. Specifically, the Chantels' and their Top 20 crossover ballad "Maybe." To much the same end is the languid and bluesy doo wop-influenced "So Long Baby," as well as the ballads "Whisper" and "Oh I Apologize." The melodic "I Know How It Feels" joins Smokey Robinson and Berry Gordy's danceable "Way Over There" and the slightly Latin-tinged rave-up "You Don't Want Me No More." Although Please Mr. Postman has been difficult to locate on compact disc, it is among the contents of Forever: The Complete Motown Albums, Vol. 1 (2009) box set from the Hip-O Select online audio boutique. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | UNI - MOTOWN

When the Marvelettes’ “Please Mr. Postman” climbed to the top of the pop charts in 1961, it was not only a hit record, it was the crossover hit an ambitious and feisty little independent label out of Detroit, Motown Records, needed. The rest is history -- Marvin Gaye, the Temptations, the Supremes, the Four Tops, Smokey Robinson -- the Motown catalog is an endless treasure, and not the least of these is the wonderful recording legacy of the Marvelettes. Somehow the public wasn’t drawn to this fine singing trio quite as much as it was to the Supremes, but the quality and consistency of the Marvelettes' work at Motown proves that they were way more than just an opening act for the Diana Ross caravan. This four-CD set, the second multi-disc set in a series documenting the Marvelettes history at Motown (the first, 2009’s Forever: The Complete Motown Albums, Vol. 1, covered 1961 to 1965 and collected the group’s first six albums, plus singles, B-sides and rarities), compiles the group’s final four albums (1967’s The Marvelettes, 1968’s Sophisticated Soul, 1969’s In Full Bloom, and 1970’s The Return of the Marvelettes), along with non-LP singles, B-sides, and other rarities from the same time period, and documents the last chapter in this fine singing group’s Motown legacy -- a legacy that stands with any at the label. Without the Marvelettes, who knows what the history of Motown Records would have been like? Luckily, we don’t have to worry about it. Here’s why. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 1967 | UNI - MOTOWN

Perhaps the best studio album the Marvelettes ever recorded. The spotlight was shared between Horton and Young, and one can attest to the differences in their styles (Horton was earthier, Young the more pop-oriented). In addition to their classic hit "The Hunter Gets Captured By the Game" and what is the best version of the Van McCoy warhorse "When You're Young and In Love," there are some would-be hits such as "The Day You Take One (You Have to Take the Other)" and the lovely ballad "This Night Was Made For Love." This was an artistic triumph and proof that girl groups can mature with age. © John Lowe /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 1993 | UNI - MOTOWN

Forty-one songs, featuring most of both the A-sides and B-sides, nine of which had never been issued on album before. The ace Motown songwriting and production stable was involved in virtually every one of these tracks, making for a surprisingly strong and consistent collection. Includes all the chart hits, as well as rarities like the Phil Spector-style single they released in 1963 as the Darnells. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 1968 | UNI - MOTOWN

By this time Gladys Horton left the group and was replaced by the talented but eccentric singer/songwriter Anne Bogan. Young took control of the group and moved them more into a softer pop sound, closer to the frothy Supremes than Martha and the Vandellas. Although the material was a bit weaker, there are plenty of good songs, most notably Smokey Robinson's amusing "My Baby Must Be a Magician" and the haunting "Destination: Anywhere," in which Young performs a tremendous vocal. © John Lowe /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 30, 2012 | Soul Story

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Pop - Released December 11, 2017 | G Records

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Soul - Released August 7, 2020 | New World

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Soul - Released August 7, 2020 | New World

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R&B - Released January 1, 1994 | UNI - MOTOWN

The Marvelettes' albums, in the group's early days, were of two varieties: comprised either of rush-recorded sides slapped up against a hit single, intended to capitalize on that hit single, or mostly of single sides, rounded out with a few new tracks set down to fill out the long-player. The Marvelous Marvelettes is sort of a hybrid of those two categories -- four of its ten songs were singles that had charted (one of them, "Strange I Know," hitting the R&B Top Ten), and the Holland-Dozier-Holland-authored "Locking Up My Heart" was the group's then-current single, cut just five weeks before the album's release. But it also benefited from some new sides that showed some new (and one old) talent in their stable, starting to contribute in a serious way -- four of the songs were authored or co-authored by Norman Whitfield, then 22 years old and starting to make his early mark on Motown's sound. The latter material, especially the delightfully lighthearted "Silly Boy" -- showing the group at its least self-serious -- may not have been groundbreaking, but neither was it a bad beginning contribution by Whitfield. And "Why Must You Go" -- an achingly beautiful slowie that shows more language facility than was common in soul ballads of the time -- was good enough to end the album, and it succeeds (as does the group) by leaving the listener wanting more. Among the other highlights, "My Daddy Knows Best," authored by Berry Gordy, is a throwback to an earlier, pre-Motown harmony vocal sound that is sung so beguilingly that it's impossible to dislike the song (which got to the lower reaches of the Hot 100). The next time out of the box for the group -- which would be four years (!) and one greatest-hits compilation later -- the Marvelettes would do even better by their talent and the songs handed to them. © Bruce Eder & John Lowe /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 9, 2016 | Play Digital

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Pop - Released April 21, 2014 | Play Digital

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Soul - Released July 22, 2013 | Heaven And Earth Music

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R&B - Released January 1, 1970 | UNI - MOTOWN

Initially, their last studio album for the Tamla label was planned as a solo outing for lead singer Wanda Young, but Berry Gordy chose instead to market it as a Marvelettes album. Although there are a pair of great ballads in "Take Me Where You Go" and "After All," the album comes off as emotionally monotone, and not even Smokey Robinson's studio expertise can save Young from banality. © John Lowe /TiVo
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R&B - Released December 1, 2019 | Mpm

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R&B - Released January 1, 1962 | UNI - MOTOWN

Despite being one of Motown's first big acts, the Marvelettes didn't record as many albums as the Temptations, Supremes, the Miracles, Stevie Wonder, or Martha & the Vandellas, but the girls from Inkster, MI did record some unforgettable sides and some good LPs. Playboy, titled after their big hit, was one of the good ones, yet Motown has never reissued it. "Playboy" flew up the charts; its message was a warning to girls about players. A spirited "Beechwood 4-5789" keeps the hits flowing -- its teenish backing vocals and Gladys Horton's innocent lead are contagious. Smokey Robinson's first Marvelettes' production, "I Think I Can Change You," was a forerunner to the string of hits he later produced for them with Wanda Young on lead. "Forever," later done by Marvin Gaye, is a sentimental thriller. A hopeful "Someday, Someway" -- written by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, and Freddie Gorman (the Originals), who also wrote "Forever" -- was a staple of their early stage shows. This is far more enjoyable than their Please Mr. Postman debut. © Andrew Hamilton /TiVo
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Soul - Released January 10, 2020 | Vintage Records