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Alternative & Indie - Released April 8, 2016 | Decca (UMO)

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Maybe the Lumineers got tired of hearing other bands replicate the big-footed stomp of "Ho Hey," an aesthetic that was impossible to avoid in the wake of their eponymous 2012 debut. So many bands adopted this thunderous folk that it no longer seemed to belong to the Lumineers; it appeared communal, perhaps existing to the earlier generations the Lumineers so clearly loved yet never quite replicated. Given this omnipresence, maybe it's not a surprise that the trio avoid any semblance of infectious rhythms on Cleopatra, their long-awaited second album, yet the sobriety of this 2016 affair is striking. Melancholy and sullen, Cleopatra feels like a conscious reaction to the idea that the band was merely a boisterous retro-throwback, a band that existed primarily on the surface. Apart from the lead single "Ophelia" and "Cleopatra," this sophomore set avoids tempos that could be called sprightly, and melody comes second to mood as well. Sometimes, the Lumineers are quite effective at being evocative: there's a certain dusky shimmer to the album, an atmosphere that tends to hang as heavy as fog as the record rolls along. This sequencing, where the relatively hookier tunes are pushed toward the front, is typical in the 21st century -- albums are front-loaded to pull in casual listeners, making the bet that the serious fans will stick around for the serious stuff that arrives at the end of the record -- but this also robs Cleopatra of velocity, with whatever energy there was dissipating by the album's conclusion, when the record winds down with its quietest moments. Nevertheless, there's something admirable about the album's solemnity: the Lumineers are on a quest to be taken seriously, and even if they overplay their hand, the earnestness is ingratiating. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | Decca (UMO)

The Lumineers, a folk-rock trio out of Denver, Colorado, have a pretty interesting sound, an Americana mesh of folk, rock, and gospel that is similar in tone to the Waterboys, say, or an alt-folk version of Bob Dylan circa Desire, thanks in no small part to Neyla Pekarek's inventive cello. And there are some very good tracks on this debut album, including the chamber honky tonk of "Dead Sea," the delightfully goofy but then ultimately sad and elegant "Submarines," and "Stubborn Love," which manages to be bright and chiming while also being haunting and mournful. Not everything here clicks together at that level, but each track is inventive, and when the songwriting and arrangements cross paths perfectly, as they do in the above songs, this is a delightful band. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 8, 2016 | Decca (UMO)

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Maybe the Lumineers got tired of hearing other bands replicate the big-footed stomp of "Ho Hey," an aesthetic that was impossible to avoid in the wake of their eponymous 2012 debut. So many bands adopted this thunderous folk that it no longer seemed to belong to the Lumineers; it appeared communal, perhaps existing to the earlier generations the Lumineers so clearly loved yet never quite replicated. Given this omnipresence, maybe it's not a surprise that the trio avoid any semblance of infectious rhythms on Cleopatra, their long-awaited second album, yet the sobriety of this 2016 affair is striking. Melancholy and sullen, Cleopatra feels like a conscious reaction to the idea that the band was merely a boisterous retro-throwback, a band that existed primarily on the surface. Apart from the lead single "Ophelia" and "Cleopatra," this sophomore set avoids tempos that could be called sprightly, and melody comes second to mood as well. Sometimes, the Lumineers are quite effective at being evocative: there's a certain dusky shimmer to the album, an atmosphere that tends to hang as heavy as fog as the record rolls along. This sequencing, where the relatively hookier tunes are pushed toward the front, is typical in the 21st century -- albums are front-loaded to pull in casual listeners, making the bet that the serious fans will stick around for the serious stuff that arrives at the end of the record -- but this also robs Cleopatra of velocity, with whatever energy there was dissipating by the album's conclusion, when the record winds down with its quietest moments. Nevertheless, there's something admirable about the album's solemnity: the Lumineers are on a quest to be taken seriously, and even if they overplay their hand, the earnestness is ingratiating. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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III

Alternative & Indie - Released September 13, 2019 | Decca (UMO)

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III is a prosaic title for a release as ambitious as the Lumineers' third effort. The numeric title carries a double meaning: the album is a song cycle told in three parts, with the first two available as a digital EP prior to the September 2019 release of III. Through these three chapters, the Lumineers tell a tale of the long-lasting ramifications of addiction and co-dependence. The ten ruminative songs (the deluxe edition adds three bonus tracks, including a cover of Leonard Cohen's "Democracy" and the slight sketch "Soundtrack Song") are collectively a far cry from the rousing stomp of "Ho Hey." Tempos rarely quicken and the arrangements often do little more than gently cradle the plaintive voice of Wesley Schultz. When the record does get a little lively, as it does on "It Wasn't Easy to Be Happy for You" and the searching closer "Salt and the Sea," there's still a melancholy undercurrent tying the whole record together. Schultz and co-writer Jeremiah Fraites etch telling details into their story that make the sadness seem earned and realized, if lugubrious. III moves at a deliberate, nearly dreary pace that forces a listener to pay attention, and while it can take some effort to meet the Lumineers on their own terms, it's nevertheless easy to admire the ambition behind the project. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 19, 2021 | Decca (UMO)

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 27, 2012 | Decca (UMO)

The Lumineers, a folk-rock trio out of Denver, Colorado, have a pretty interesting sound, an Americana mesh of folk, rock, and gospel that is similar in tone to the Waterboys, say, or an alt-folk version of Bob Dylan circa Desire, thanks in no small part to Neyla Pekarek's inventive cello. And there are some very good tracks on this debut album, including the chamber honky tonk of "Dead Sea," the delightfully goofy but then ultimately sad and elegant "Submarines," and "Stubborn Love," which manages to be bright and chiming while also being haunting and mournful. Not everything here clicks together at that level, but each track is inventive, and when the songwriting and arrangements cross paths perfectly, as they do in the above songs, this is a delightful band. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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Ambient/New Age - Released December 18, 2020 | Decca (UMO)

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Pop - Released April 28, 2021 | Dualtone Music Group

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 13, 2018 | Decca (UMO)

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 12, 2019 | Columbia

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 8, 2016 | Decca (UMO)

Maybe the Lumineers got tired of hearing other bands replicate the big-footed stomp of "Ho Hey," an aesthetic that was impossible to avoid in the wake of their eponymous 2012 debut. So many bands adopted this thunderous folk that it no longer seemed to belong to the Lumineers; it appeared communal, perhaps existing to the earlier generations the Lumineers so clearly loved yet never quite replicated. Given this omnipresence, maybe it's not a surprise that the trio avoid any semblance of infectious rhythms on Cleopatra, their long-awaited second album, yet the sobriety of this 2016 affair is striking. Melancholy and sullen, Cleopatra feels like a conscious reaction to the idea that the band was merely a boisterous retro-throwback, a band that existed primarily on the surface. Apart from the lead single "Ophelia" and "Cleopatra," this sophomore set avoids tempos that could be called sprightly, and melody comes second to mood as well. Sometimes, the Lumineers are quite effective at being evocative: there's a certain dusky shimmer to the album, an atmosphere that tends to hang as heavy as fog as the record rolls along. This sequencing, where the relatively hookier tunes are pushed toward the front, is typical in the 21st century -- albums are front-loaded to pull in casual listeners, making the bet that the serious fans will stick around for the serious stuff that arrives at the end of the record -- but this also robs Cleopatra of velocity, with whatever energy there was dissipating by the album's conclusion, when the record winds down with its quietest moments. Nevertheless, there's something admirable about the album's solemnity: the Lumineers are on a quest to be taken seriously, and even if they overplay their hand, the earnestness is ingratiating. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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III

Alternative & Indie - Released September 13, 2019 | Decca (UMO)

III is a prosaic title for a release as ambitious as the Lumineers' third effort. The numeric title carries a double meaning: the album is a song cycle told in three parts, with the first two available as a digital EP prior to the September 2019 release of III. Through these three chapters, the Lumineers tell a tale of the long-lasting ramifications of addiction and co-dependence. The ten ruminative songs (the deluxe edition adds three bonus tracks, including a cover of Leonard Cohen's "Democracy" and the slight sketch "Soundtrack Song") are collectively a far cry from the rousing stomp of "Ho Hey." Tempos rarely quicken and the arrangements often do little more than gently cradle the plaintive voice of Wesley Schultz. When the record does get a little lively, as it does on "It Wasn't Easy to Be Happy for You" and the searching closer "Salt and the Sea," there's still a melancholy undercurrent tying the whole record together. Schultz and co-writer Jeremiah Fraites etch telling details into their story that make the sadness seem earned and realized, if lugubrious. III moves at a deliberate, nearly dreary pace that forces a listener to pay attention, and while it can take some effort to meet the Lumineers on their own terms, it's nevertheless easy to admire the ambition behind the project. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

Alternative & Indie - Released May 17, 2019 | Decca (UMO)

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Folk - Released August 4, 2021 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 24, 2018 | Decca (UMO)

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Folk - Released August 11, 2021 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 2, 2018 | Decca (UMO)

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 2, 2016 | Decca (UMO)

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 8, 2016 | Decca (UMO)

Maybe the Lumineers got tired of hearing other bands replicate the big-footed stomp of "Ho Hey," an aesthetic that was impossible to avoid in the wake of their eponymous 2012 debut. So many bands adopted this thunderous folk that it no longer seemed to belong to the Lumineers; it appeared communal, perhaps existing to the earlier generations the Lumineers so clearly loved yet never quite replicated. Given this omnipresence, maybe it's not a surprise that the trio avoid any semblance of infectious rhythms on Cleopatra, their long-awaited second album, yet the sobriety of this 2016 affair is striking. Melancholy and sullen, Cleopatra feels like a conscious reaction to the idea that the band was merely a boisterous retro-throwback, a band that existed primarily on the surface. Apart from the lead single "Ophelia" and "Cleopatra," this sophomore set avoids tempos that could be called sprightly, and melody comes second to mood as well. Sometimes, the Lumineers are quite effective at being evocative: there's a certain dusky shimmer to the album, an atmosphere that tends to hang as heavy as fog as the record rolls along. This sequencing, where the relatively hookier tunes are pushed toward the front, is typical in the 21st century -- albums are front-loaded to pull in casual listeners, making the bet that the serious fans will stick around for the serious stuff that arrives at the end of the record -- but this also robs Cleopatra of velocity, with whatever energy there was dissipating by the album's conclusion, when the record winds down with its quietest moments. Nevertheless, there's something admirable about the album's solemnity: the Lumineers are on a quest to be taken seriously, and even if they overplay their hand, the earnestness is ingratiating. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

Folk - Released August 18, 2021 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

Download not available