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Rock - Released July 22, 2014 | Masterworks

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Découverte JAZZ NEWS
Revelator is the debut studio album from the 11-piece Tedeschi-Trucks Band, who already have a reputation as a wildly exciting live jam group. That said, the record that Susan Tedeschi and husband Derek Trucks have recorded proves something beyond their well-founded reputation as a live unit: that they can write, perform, and produce great songs that capture the authentic, emotional fire and original arrangements that so many modern blues and roots recordings lack. The duo forged their two individual solo bands (Trucks remains with the Allman Brothers Band) and added some other players. Oteil and Kofi Burbridge and Mike Mattison, as well as drummers Tyler Greenwell and J.J. Johnson are on board, as well as backing vocalists and a horn section. Produced by Trucks and Jim Scott, these 12 songs seamlessly meld blues, rock, Southern soul, gospel, and funk traditions into a heady, seductive, spine-slipping stew. The record also showcases Tedeschi as one of the finest vocal stylists in roots music, and Trucks, has become the only true heir of Duane Allman's bell-like slide guitar tone, his taste and restraint. More than this, Revelator offers proof that this pair and their bandmates are serious songwriters as well as players--anyone remember the original Little Feat? It's like that, but with a woman up front. While the single, "Midnight in Harlem," highlights the softer,side of the band with Tedeschi's soulful croon and Trucks' swooning slide, it's the harder numbers that fill out the story. The sexy opener "Come See About Me," the bluesy, gospelized "Don't Let Me Slide" (one of two cuts written by Trucks and Tedeschi with Jayhawk Gary Louris), the second-line funk-blues of "Bound for Glory" with its punchy horns; all of these offer evidence of the real depth that this band abundantly possesses. There's the skittering, slow-tempo guitar and B-3 soul-blues of "Simple Things," and the New Orleans-style horns introducing "Until You Remember," which can distract the listener for a moment from experiencing these songs for what they are-- until Tedeschi opens her mouth and lets the lyrics come up from her belly and drip from her lips and Trucks matches her emotion in his solo-- love songs; the likes of which we haven't heard since Delaney & Bonnie. The Eastern modal tinge in Trucks' playing and tablas dustinguishes "These Walls," tempered by the quiet conviction in the grain of Tedeschi's vocal would have made for a better single. The nasty, funky, Hendrixian droning blues of "Learn How to Love" is textured by Kofi's funky clavinet and Wurlitzer. Speaking of funk, Tedeschi takes her own smoking guitar break in "Love Has Something Else to Say," a slamming, break-ridden funk tune that quakes. It combines hard Southern Stax-styled rhythm, soul, blues, and nasty-ass rock. Revelator is a roots record that sets a modern standard even as it draws its inspiration from the past. It's got everything a listener could want: grit, groove, raw, spiritual emotion, and expert-level musical truth. ~ Thom Jurek
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Rock - Released February 15, 2019 | Fantasy

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As the saying goes, good broth may be made in an old pot. Singer/guitarist Susan Tedeschi, her husband/guitarist Derek Trucks and their old sidekicks go to prove this once again with their music that flows between electric blues, classic rock, country and vintage soul. As worthy heirs of the Allman Brothers (for whom Butch Trucks, Derek’s uncle who died in January 2017, was the original drummer), the Tedeschi Trucks Band turns Signs into a shrine for their Southern rock roots with virtuosic guitars and scalding brass. Recorded at the couple's Swamp Raga studio in Jacksonville, Florida, this fourth album is also a tribute to several of Derek Trucks’ mentors who have recently died: his uncle Butch, guitarist Col. Bruce Hampton and another legendary member of the Allman Brothers, Gregg Allman himself. The celebration remains lively throughout the record and Susan Tedeschi's warm, deep and sensual voice magnifies each composition. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Rock - Released February 15, 2019 | Fantasy

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Rock - Released March 17, 2017 | Concord Records, Inc. (UMG Account)

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Rock - Released January 29, 2016 | Concord Music Group

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Blues - Released October 10, 2013 | Masterworks

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Made Up Mind, the second studio album from the Tedeschi Trucks Band, contrasts considerably with Revelator in that it showcases the strength of an 11-piece band willing to experiment as they assimilate inspirations -- from Stax, Muscle Shoals, Motown, Delaney & Bonnie, blues, and jazz -- and incorporate their various experiences into a new whole. Co-produced by Derek Trucks and Jim Scott, there is an increased emphasis on songwriting and more sophisticated arrangements. At the behest of Sony, Susan Tedeschi and Trucks invited other songwriters (some old friends) to contribute to these songs, adding perspective. They include Doyle Bramhall II, John Leventhal, Gary Louris, Eric Krasno, and Sonya Kitchell. Tedeschi's voice has developed into one of the most expressive in modern music; she receives outstanding choral support from Mike Mattison and Mark Rivers. Trucks' lead and slide guitar playing have evolved, creating new possibilities for the instrument; it remains the anchor of musical direction for this massive ensemble, that also boasts a horn section, keyboards, two drummers, and four alternating bassists. It always stands out, but rarely dominates. The title opener is a roaring blues-rock boogie. Tedeschi wails atop punchy gospel piano from Kofi Burbridge and a ripping slide guitar solo with horns blazing. A funky clavinet introduces the Sly Stone-inspired "Misunderstood." Trucks' silvery wah-wah guitar drives chunky horn fills, a grooving B-3, and tough vocal exchanges between the vocalists. Tedeschi and Saunders Sermons duet on the fingerpopping soul tune "Part of Me," which recalls Motown's early years; his sweet falsetto is the perfect foil for her grainy contralto. Trucks' guitar fills accent the call and response vocals in the second half, and the Northern soul melody is contrasted by a grittier Stax-style horn chart. The ballads -- the spiritually poignant "It's So Heavy" and the devastating, broken love song "Sweet and Low" -- with their subtleties and canny arrangements display a real TTB strength. It is no mean feat to deliver music this intimate and personal with such a large ensemble. On the rockers, everybody is engaged at a heightened level, as in the funky, grimy, blues-rock strut of "Whiskey Legs" and the off-the-rails roil of "The Storm." On the latter, hard rock, blues, and jazz intertwine, and Trucks gets the opportunity to spiral off into the exploratory void. Closer "Calling Out to You" is simply his National steel guitar caressing Tedeschi's voice in a tender love song. Made Up Mind is tight, though it maintains the gritty, steamy, Southern heart displayed on Revelator, though on some level it feels just a bit restrained. Everything these players have assimilated throughout their individual careers is filtered through the group consciousness. When it expresses itself fully, historical and cultural lineages are questioned and answered in their dialogue. It's a sound that is instantly recognizable, sure, but it also offers a nearly limitless set of sonic possibilities. three years in, this is the sound of a band that's just getting started. Watch out. ~ Thom Jurek
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Rock - Released January 29, 2016 | Concord Music Group

Hi-Res Booklet
After 2013's Made Up Mind, Tedeschi Trucks Band hit the road hard, racking up 200 dates in 2014. After Derek Trucks played the Allman Brothers Band's final shows, and TTB's parting with Sony, the 12-piece band and friends (including Doyle Bramhall II) entered their Swamp Raga Studios behind Trucks' and Susan Tedeschi's home, and began recording jam-style rehearsals; everyone was encouraged to contribute ideas, songs, etc. They'd break to work the road then return to record some more. The end result is Let Me Get By, produced by Trucks, recorded by Bobby Tis, and released by Fantasy. Jazz bassist Tim Lefebvre joined permanently (he was also part of David Bowie's band on Blackstar), and Alecia Chakour was enlisted to balance Mike Mattison and Mark Rivers on backing vocals. The lineup is rounded out by keyboardist Kofi Burbridge, drummers Tyler Greenwell and J.J. Johnson, and a three-piece horn section. Trucks proves a fearless producer here. This collaboratively written ten-song set showcases the band's skill at playing and composing through Southern soul, roots rock, blues, greasy funk, jazz, Indian classical, film music, and African and Brazilian polyrhythms. An obvious studio offering, it's warm and resonant, yet crackling with energy and ideas. The feel is loose and grooving, the performances hot. Over TTB's last two albums, Tedeschi has become comfortable as the lead singer of a large band. She's almost iconic here, taking chances with phrasing, finding hidden spaces in lines and syllables, and emoting from the belly. She never oversells a song but always sings the hell out of it. (Check "Anyhow" if you want shivers.) She plays a mean guitar, too: her solo in the gritty, punchy, party funk number "Don't Know What It Means" is a highlight. But everybody gets to shine here -- Mattison with lead vocals on the Brechtian-esque carny rock of "Right on Time," and the modal soul of "Crying Over You/Swamp Raga for Hozapfel, Lefebvre, Flute and Harmonium" -- adding character and depth to TTB's signature. Lefebvre's syncopation and invention create new possibilities for harmonic and rhythmic dialogue. His bass pushes the funky dual drum breaks and biting electric piano and organ on the title cut, allowing roaring horns, soaring chorus vocals, and Trucks' spiraling slide to collide with and flow through one another. The unusual meld of Memphis soul, Bollywood-style strings, Eastern electric slide, and strummed acoustic guitars creatively come together to support Tedeschi's wrenching, affirmative vocal in the passionate "Hear Me. The rave-up dancefloor R&B in "I Want More" is guaranteed to put any party into overdrive. The meld of gospel, soul, doo wop, and blues rock on closer "In Every Heart" offers a Trucks' solo that digs deep in the emotional grain to contrast with the sweet vibe. Never has TTB sounded so organic, relaxed, and free. Let Me Get By is the album this group has been striving for since their formation. You need this. ~ Thom Jurek
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Blues - Released May 18, 2012 | Masterworks

Hi-Res Booklet
The Tedeschi Trucks Band is an 11-piece ensemble made up of guitarist-vocalist Susan Tedeschi's and guitarist Derek Trucks' individual bands. They made their debut with 2011's Grammy-winning Revelator, a sprawling collection that showcased funky R&B, gospel, blues, and scorching large band rock. Everybody's Talkin', a double disc, is a live offering from that supporting tour. Produced by Trucks, it includes live versions of some album tracks and six beautifully chosen covers; all its tunes are given extended, imaginatively arranged treatments. It's an unusual live record because its balance of sonic precision and stage-born kinetics is perfect -- this band transitions seamlessly between R&B, blues, rock, gospel, and jazz. These performances never succumb to mere jam band clichés. On disc one, "Midnight in Harlem" is introduced by a mini raga played as a slide solo by Trucks. The band enters gradually, and Tedeschi's soulful vocal carries them all the way in. (Tedeschi is revealed, song after song -- far beyond her solo records or even Revelator -- to be among the truly great singers in modern blues and rock; by turns graceful and grainy, her expression reaches the spiritual in execution.) At over 11 minutes, the interplay between guitarists, Mike Mattison's backing vocals, keyboards, and rhythm section are impeccable. Things get rowdier on "Learn How to Love," with nasty guitar work by Tedeschi, and a burning tenor sax solo by Kebbi Williams. The horn section really pops in "Bound for Glory"; the exchange between the Burbridge brothers on bass and keys, with drummers Tyler Greenwell and J.J. Johnson, adds a knotty improv bridge where deep funk and blues grind together. The disc closes with an astonishing reading of John Sebastian's "Darlin" Be Home Soon." With horns tastefully accenting and underscoring lead vocals, Trucks' slide solo stays melodically true, yet moves through the band's shimmering groove into the stratosphere (and he does this throughout this album, over and over again, helping to elevate not only the tune, but the sense of groove, space, and texture). Disc two contains only four cuts but they're all gems: Pearl Woods' "That Did It" (a Bobby "Blue" Bland vehicle) is a down and gritty strut, with excellent, in-the-grain guitar work by Tedeschi. Stevie Wonder's "Uptight" is a 15-minute soul rave-up with a beautiful jazz interlude and scat singing from Oteil Burbridge in its middle, followed by a wonderfully imagined slide solo by Trucks. It's followed by the deep, horn-driven, wah-wah funk of "Love Has Something Else to Say" before closing with a stirring read of "Wade in the Water." It's a spooky gospel-blues with gorgeous alternate lead vocals by Mark Rivers and Tedeschi. Everybody's Talkin' is what every live album should be: an accurate, exciting reflection of a hot band playing full-throttle. ~ Thom Jurek
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Rock - Released March 17, 2017 | Concord Records, Inc. (UMG Account)

Led by former Allman Brothers Band guitarist Derek Trucks and blues guitarist and singer Susan Tedeschi (who is also Trucks' spouse), the Tedeschi Trucks Band have become one of the hottest bands on the contemporary blues scene. Playing a muscular fusion of blues, soul, rock, and funk that's emotionally powerful and technically dazzling, the 11-piece Tedeschi Trucks Band won a Grammy Award for their first studio album, 2011's Revelator, but the group is truly at its best in front of a live audience. Live from the Fox Oakland documents the band on the second night of a two-day stand in Northern California in September 2016. Released on video was well as audio, the show captures the group in strong form, with Trucks saying of the Oakland shows, "The last three or four months with this band have been the most growth I've ever been a part of within a group. I haven't found the ceiling yet." ~ Mark Deming
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Rock - Released January 29, 2016 | Concord Music Group

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Rock - Released December 8, 2017 | Concord Records, Inc. (UMG Account)

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Rock - Released January 29, 2016 | Concord Music Group

Rock - Released January 29, 2016 | Fantasy Records

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After 2013's Made Up Mind, Tedeschi Trucks Band hit the road hard, racking up 200 dates in 2014. After Derek Trucks played the Allman Brothers Band's final shows, and TTB's parting with Sony, the 12-piece band and friends (including Doyle Bramhall II) entered their Swamp Raga Studios behind Trucks' and Susan Tedeschi's home, and began recording jam-style rehearsals; everyone was encouraged to contribute ideas, songs, etc. They'd break to work the road then return to record some more. The end result is Let Me Get By, produced by Trucks, recorded by Bobby Tis, and released by Fantasy. Jazz bassist Tim Lefebvre joined permanently (he was also part of David Bowie's band on Blackstar), and Alecia Chakour was enlisted to balance Mike Mattison and Mark Rivers on backing vocals. The lineup is rounded out by keyboardist Kofi Burbridge, drummers Tyler Greenwell and J.J. Johnson, and a three-piece horn section. Trucks proves a fearless producer here. This collaboratively written ten-song set showcases the band's skill at playing and composing through Southern soul, roots rock, blues, greasy funk, jazz, Indian classical, film music, and African and Brazilian polyrhythms. An obvious studio offering, it's warm and resonant, yet crackling with energy and ideas. The feel is loose and grooving, the performances hot. Over TTB's last two albums, Tedeschi has become comfortable as the lead singer of a large band. She's almost iconic here, taking chances with phrasing, finding hidden spaces in lines and syllables, and emoting from the belly. She never oversells a song but always sings the hell out of it. (Check "Anyhow" if you want shivers.) She plays a mean guitar, too: her solo in the gritty, punchy, party funk number "Don't Know What It Means" is a highlight. But everybody gets to shine here -- Mattison with lead vocals on the Brechtian-esque carny rock of "Right on Time," and the modal soul of "Crying Over You/Swamp Raga for Hozapfel, Lefebvre, Flute and Harmonium" -- adding character and depth to TTB's signature. Lefebvre's syncopation and invention create new possibilities for harmonic and rhythmic dialogue. His bass pushes the funky dual drum breaks and biting electric piano and organ on the title cut, allowing roaring horns, soaring chorus vocals, and Trucks' spiraling slide to collide with and flow through one another. The unusual meld of Memphis soul, Bollywood-style strings, Eastern electric slide, and strummed acoustic guitars creatively come together to support Tedeschi's wrenching, affirmative vocal in the passionate "Hear Me. The rave-up dancefloor R&B in "I Want More" is guaranteed to put any party into overdrive. The meld of gospel, soul, doo wop, and blues rock on closer "In Every Heart" offers a Trucks' solo that digs deep in the emotional grain to contrast with the sweet vibe. Never has TTB sounded so organic, relaxed, and free. Let Me Get By is the album this group has been striving for since their formation. You need this. ~ Thom Jurek

Rock - Released January 15, 2016 | Concord Music Group

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Rock - Released December 11, 2015 | Fantasy Records

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Rock - Released November 20, 2015 | Concord Music Group

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Tedeschi Trucks Band in the magazine