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Concertos - Released November 5, 2013 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
Tasmin Little's 2013 release on Chandos is an exploration of lush and lyrical music for violin and orchestra, composed by the leading British composers of the early 20th century, and it is an album of remarkable depth and beauty. Opening the program is the Concerto for violin & orchestra by E.J. Moeran, which sets the mood for the disc with its long-breathed, melancholy lines and pastoral atmosphere. While this is a technically challenging work that shows Little to her best advantage as a virtuoso, listeners may come away from the piece recalling its sweet ambience more than its flashiness. The same could also be said for Frederick Delius' Légende, Gustav Holst's A Song of the Night, and Ralph Vaughan Williams' The Lark Ascending, all three of which provide tests for the violinist's skills, yet are filled with such gorgeous music that listeners may only remember the general opulence of the scores. Also included are premiere recordings of Roger Turner's arrangements of Edward Elgar's Chanson de matin, Chanson de nuit, and Salut d'amour, which in orchestration, mood, and style fit the rest of the album nicely. Little's polished playing is supported by the BBC Philharmonic under Andrew Davis, and the combination of her rounded tone with the rich orchestral sonorities makes this CD ideal for fans of sentimental post-Romantic music. © TiVo
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Violin Concertos - Released October 4, 2011 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
Best known for his tone poems, Frederick Delius began to write music in abstract forms later in life. The three concertos here were all composed between 1915 and 1920. They may be something of an acquired taste (like, indeed, most of Delius' music in general), but this is a superb rendering that never loses the thread of the long melodic lines the composer pursues here as possible outcomes of his wide palette of musical textures. There are certainly passages that sound as though they could have come from On Hearing the First Cuckoo in Spring or one of Delius' other popular tone poems, and in the Double Concerto especially there are hints of the African-American melodic influences Delius recalled from his time in Florida as a young man. And he seems to delight in displacing a typically muscular concerto theme with a sudden diversion into impressionistic harmonies (hear the opening of the Cello Concerto). But none of the three concertos is either simply an adaptation of Delius' orchestral style or a reversion to the virtuoso Romantic concerto. Instead Delius seems to be after the greatest possible number of ways of combining the solo instrument or instruments with the orchestra in subtle textures that periodically coalesce into moments of great lyrical beauty, such as the moment at the end of the Double Concerto where the violin and cello begin to sing in octaves. Violinist Tasmin Little and cellist Paul Watkins both execute fearsomely difficult solo lines, and Watkins even returns for the most part to the almost-unplayable original version of the Cello Concerto. The BBC Symphony Orchestra under Andrew Davis achieves the restrained luminosity that's essential for this difficult composer's music, and this is a fine selection for those bitten by the Delius bug. © TiVo
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Violin Concertos - Released November 16, 2010 | Chandos

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Chamber Music - Released November 6, 2012 | Chandos

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Classical - Released February 1, 2019 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
Tasmin Little returns with a line-up of three women composers whose lives share some features but also significant differences that illustrate the complex lives of female musicians. Clara Schumann, Dame Ethel Smyth, and Amy Beach all came from families that encouraged their musical interests but balked, in varying degrees, at professional training and engagement. All three composers draw on the influence of Robert Schumann and Brahms; Beach and Smyth, in particular, were fond of metrical and motivic manipulation. Tasmin Little plays this music, so close to her heart, with her usual warmth and dexterity. The manuscript of Clara Schumann’s final chamber work, Three Romances, declares it ‘for piano and violin’, an ordering reflected in the relative complexity of the parts, the florid passagework here played beautifully by Little’s long-term collaborator, John Lenehan. © Chandos
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Classical - Released January 3, 2020 | Chandos

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Classical - Released September 1, 2017 | Chandos

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None of these three Polish violin concertos are terribly common on concert programs. They are fearsomely virtuosic, and British violinist Tasmin Little meets the challenges in every way that could be desired. Sample the finale of the five-movement Violin Concerto No. 1, Op. 35, of Karol Szymanowski, with the long, double-stop-strewn, cadenza-like passage in the middle answered by orchestral tumult. It's an exciting work throughout, and the Violin Concerto No. 2, Op. 61, of 1933, is even better, with strong folkloric elements pared down to compact statements in a fascinating way that suggests Szymanowski had been listening to Bartók and trying to reconcile his discoveries with his own language. The final concerto by Miezyslaw Karlowicz is a bravura work in the Tchaikovskian vein, especially at the very beginning where Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1 in B flat minor, Op. 23 is the clear model. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 7, 2016 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
Of the countless recordings of Vivaldi's Four Seasons violin concertos on the market, quite a number pair the set with some other work or works devoted to the seasons. Piazzolla's Cuatro Estaciones Porteños (Buenos Aires Four Seasons) were a popular choice for a while. But English violinist Tasmin Little is onto something new here: a commissioned group of original pieces on the seasonal theme. The Four World Seasons of composer Roxanna Panufnik were written at a rate of one per year between 2008 and 2011 (not 2007, as the track list states) in response to Little's commissions. They are good examples of the style that has made Panufnik one of Britain's most popular contemporary composers, with specific content (here national and pictorial) wedded to a lush, neo-Romantic style that generally avoids sentimentality and maintains a good deal of rigor. Panufnik's four seasons are respectively Albanian (she starts with autumn), Tibetan (with a singing bowl in the orchestra), Japanese (with marvelous bird calls), and Indian (with a nice evocation of Indian pieces at the end of the virtuoso finale). Three are dedicated to Little, and two of those to the fine small Orchestra of the Swan as well, but Little, as conductor, coaxes comparable playing out of the BBC Symphony Orchestra, and her connection with Panufnik's music is evident. Less clear is her way with Vivaldi; aside from an active harpsichord continuo realization by David Wright, in which he participates in the pictorialism, there's little that stands out in her reading. And somehow the Panufnik does not really engage in dialogue with the Vivaldi model; despite the theme, her four seasons are self-contained entities. For Panufnik fans, however, this will be an attractive find. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released May 1, 2020 | Chandos

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Tasmin Little and Piers Lane complete their three album overview of British violin sonatas with works by York Bowen, John Ireland, William Alwyn, Eric Coates, and the world premiere recording of James Francis Brown’s The Hart’s Grace. Composed for the inaugural Hertfordshire Festival of Music, the work was premiered by Tasmin in Hertford in June 2016. The central premise of The Hart’s Grace is the emotional transformation experienced by a restless observer when encountering the almost magical, elusive freedom of the deer. John Ireland composed his Second Sonata between 1915 and 1917, dedicating it to Albert Sammons who gave the premiere. Alwyn’s Sonatina dates from 1933, whilst the Coates and Bowen pieces were both composed during the Second World War (1943 and 1945 respectively). Coates’s First Meeting was commissioned by Lionel Tertis and originally conceived for viola, but it was revised for violin for its publication (in 1943). © Chandos
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Classical - Released November 13, 2015 | Chandos

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The violinist Tasmin Little has championed a good deal of neglected music from her native Britain, and here she makes a good case for a trio of rarely performed works. Each will remind the listener of other composers, but all are well-executed, virtuoso pieces that are performed with cool perfection. The Violin Concerto in G minor, Op. 80, by the African-British composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, was written in response to an American commission for a work based on African-American themes; the composer discarded that idea and responded with a work strongly in the Dvorák vein, only to have the orchestral parts lost on a trans-Atlantic crossing (not, as was long thought, on the Titanic) and reconstructed yet again. Sample the first movement for a taste of Little's confidence in this music and ability to put it across. The Suite for violin and orchestra by Frederick Delius is an early, intensely lyrical work that anticipates in mood, if not in language, the composer's Impressionist tone poems. Probably the rarest of the three pieces is the 1928 Violin Concerto in A minor by Haydn Wood, best known as a composer of what is known in Britain as light music and in North America as easy listening. This is a pure Romantic work, between Brahms and Elgar but pushed in the direction of light music and film music, and its violin part is elegant indeed. Wood was a noted violinist, although this work was written for the Spanish player Antonio Brosa, who also premiered Benjamin Britten's concerto. The performances by Little and the BBC Philharmonic under Sir Andrew Davis are confident, idiomatic, and quite involved emotionally, and they make you think that these works could easily fit into concert programs once more. © TiVo
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Classical - Released June 5, 2020 | Chandos

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Chamber Music - Released April 28, 2015 | Chandos

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Classical - Released October 3, 2011 | Parlophone UK

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Classical - Released March 2, 2018 | Chandos

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This Brahms album with the internationally acclaimed duo Tasmin Little and Piers Lane will stand as a landmark in their already highly praised discography of romantic chamber music repertoire. Standing amongst the summits of the genre, the three violin sonatas by Brahms, his only ever published ones, are a pure demonstration of radiant effusiveness and romanticism in that they call for great virtuosity as well as empathy from both instruments equally. Although written twenty-five years later, they have their origin in 1853 when Brahms made the acquaintance of the Schumanns and, above all, of the great violinist Joseph Joachim, who would remain one of his closest and most musically influential friends. From the profoundly lyrical Op. 78 and Op. 100 to the more pianistic Op. 108, this recording reveals Brahms at his most intense, poetic, and melodic. Faultless support is delivered by a duo that has now established itself as a major force in romantic repertoire. © Chandos
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Chamber Music - Released November 4, 2014 | Chandos

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Chamber Music - Released April 21, 2017 | Chandos

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Chamber Music - Released June 4, 2013 | Chandos

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Classical - Released December 31, 1995 | RCA - Sony Masterworks

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Classical - Released October 1, 2001 | Warner Classics