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Ambient - Released January 31, 2020 | Kscope

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Before Moroder, Jarre and Kraftwerk, there was Tangerine Dream. Started in 1967 as an experimental rock band by German Edgar Froese, Tangerine Dream became the first big electronic music group, and a cult name for amateurs of psychedelic music - leading the renowned rock critic Lester Bangs to say “I saw God and/or Tangerine Dream” in a legendary article detailing one of their concerts in 1977 New York. Signed by Virgin in 1974 when the New Age was in full swing, TD introduced synths and sequencers on successful albums such as Phaedra and Stratosfear. But since 2015, the group has been without its creator, who recorded his last song, Zero Gravity, with Jean-Michel Jarre for the album Electronica 1: The Time Machine. The remaining trio, Thorsten Quaeschning (keyboards, drums, vocals, guitar), Hoshiko Yamane (violin, cello) and Ulrich Schnauss (keyboards, piano) decided to pursue Froese’s vision, who’s final idea consisted of combining quantum physics and music, resulting in the 2017 album Quantum Gate, partly based on his last recordings. For Recurring Dreams, the concept is the same, but is applied to older recordings from the band, from every era and with “every generation of synthesiser and sequencer” along with some new arrangements. The album has tracks from the 70s (Sequent C, Phaedra), the 80s (Tangram, Horizon, Yellowstone Park) and the 90s (The Claymore Mine / Stalking), a compilation of cosmic classics which should delight even the most sceptical of fans. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Electronic - Released April 20, 2018 | Kscope

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Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Virgin Catalogue

Fans generally acknowledge the classic era of Tangerine Dream as coinciding with their Virgin years, which this collection rounds up nicely, opening with two landmarks, Phaedra and Rubycon, then including the group's broadening of scope and direction with the live Ricochet, Stratosfear, and Cyclone. This was directly after the early avant-garde years, consisting of experimental, arrhythmic work like Atem and Electronic Meditation, and before the Hollywood years, when Edgar Froese and co. began composing work for movie scores like Risky Business. Phaedra and Rubycon have not dated at all since their early-‘70s recording, despite Froese, Peter Baumann, and Chris Franke’s early adoption of Moog technology, along with Mellotron and other electric or electronic instruments. Along with the full LPs in their most recent remastering, the collection also rounds up single edits and 7” versions when they were originally available. © John Bush /TiVo
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New Age - Released September 8, 2015 | Cleopatra Records

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Rock - Released June 14, 2019 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Released January 1, 1985 | Virgin Records

Dream Sequence is an electronic wandering through this German band's most familiar instrumental endeavors. The two discs are made up of tracks stemming from such monumental albums as 1974's Phaedra and 1976's Stratosfear, merging right into some of their finest material from the early '80s. Fans of full-length Tangerine Dream tracks should take note that three of their most popular offerings are only excerpts, including "Rubycon Part One." The rest of the album is comprised of delightful synthesized washes that represent Tangerine Dream's mind-numbing electronic voyages, like the spaciousness of "Cloudburst Flight" or the finite complexity of "Logos Part One." Not all of their music basks in the coldness of keyboard machination though. The glistening beauty of "Beach Scene" fuses the genius of Franke, Froese, and Schmoelling and conveys marvelous imagery of both the sea and sand. Even the 19-plus minutes of "Tangram Part One" doesn't roam aimlessly, but instead is highlighted by sparkling pitch changes and numerous rhythms. If not looked upon as an essential collection, Dream Sequence can be regarded as an entertaining two-hour trip through some gorgeous electronic music. © Mike DeGagne /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 30, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Electronic - Released April 22, 2014 | Eastgate Music & Arts

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1977 | Geffen*

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Electronic - Released January 1, 2012 | Virgin Catalogue

"Best of the bunch is EXIT, a beauty of Cold War paranoia, broody synths and relatively concise songs." © TiVo
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Ambient - Released October 13, 2017 | Kscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1977 | Geffen

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Electronic - Released February 12, 2018 | Eastgate Music & Arts

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Progressive Rock - Released May 30, 2011 | Esoteric

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Ambient - Released February 26, 2013 | Purple Pyramid Records

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Progressive Rock - Released May 30, 2011 | Esoteric

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Electronic - Released August 20, 2018 | Eastgate Music & Arts

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Progressive Rock - Released May 30, 2011 | Esoteric

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Progressive Rock - Released August 1, 1985 | Esoteric

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Electronic - Released January 25, 2019 | Eastgate Music & Arts