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Pop - Released October 8, 1980 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Rock - Released May 31, 1983 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released September 16, 1977 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
Talking Heads fans have been waiting a long time to have the band's eight studio albums remastered and reissued, but they may find that the long-awaited revamping of the group's catalog is somewhat problematic. Instead of being released as individual titles, all eight titles were boxed and reissued as an expensive set, Talking Heads Brick (this box retails for $149.99; individual releases are tentatively scheduled to follow, three to four months after this set's October 2005 release) -- and they're not issued as CDs, they're only available as DualDiscs, a format that contains a CD on one side and a DVD on the other. Each album is presented in expanded form with a handful of bonus tracks on the CD side, with the DVD side containing the entire album, but usually not the new bonus tracks available on the CD side, in 5.1 Surround mixes and PCM stereo, plus some additional video bonus material. DualDiscs do offer more than a conventional CD, but they're thicker than CDs, which may mean that they may not play on all CD players, and almost surely won't play on any computer or car stereo -- all things that will frustrate fans, but that's hardly not the only thing that will frustrate them about this brick-like set. There's the fact that while most of the group's videos are here, some, like "Once in a Lifetime," are conspicuously missing. Then, there's the packaging, which may be considerably more user-friendly than the ungainly 2003 box Once in a Lifetime, but it's designed as an all-white art object. The raised-type text of the group's song titles is pretty cool on the outside of this moulded plastic box, but each individual CD is given a white tray inlay that contains no text at all -- no text on the spine indicating what album it is, no song titles on the back, which means that anybody wanting to know what the bonus tracks are on an individual discs will have to open up the booklets, which is exceptionally infuriating. Those booklets also contain an insert miniture art lithograph -- replications of pictures and photos interpreting what certain Talking Heads songs mean -- plus testimonials and some artwork recycled from the 2003 box, along with full lyrics, including some shots of the original lyrics. It's nice, but more complete liner notes would have been appreciated. Apart from these packaging and format problems, the set does deliver on many fan's highest hopes for the set. The sound is indeed a marked improvement over the shoddy compact discs that have been on the market for roughly 20 years; it's not an improvement on the 2003 box, but an extension, and it's a pleasure to hear all these albums in such clear, rich sound. Similarly, the 5.1 mixes are good and use the sound stage well, even if they're not particularly revelatory. Of course, the bonus tracks are of the most interest to the hardcore fans who have been waiting for this overhaul of the group's catalog, and, by and large, this new material is very good. Talking Heads: 77 has the singles "Love=Building on Fire" and "I Wish You Wouldn't Say That," plus the B-side acoustic version of "Psycho Killer" and "Sugar on My Tongue," which previously appeared on Sand in the Vaseline; there's also a good previously unreleased outtake of an early song called "I Feel It in My Heart," which is also on the DVD side as a compelling video performance of the band playing at the Kitchen in 1976, while there's video of the group live in 1978 playing "Pulled Up." More Songs About Buildings and Food has a spare version of "Stay Hungry" cut during the 77 sessions, along with alternates of "I'm Not in Love" and "The Big Country," which are lean, fairly rough, and exciting. There's also a previously "Country Angel" version of "Thank You for Sending Me an Angel," which is built on acoustic guitars and has heavy washes of organs; there are two live performances from 1978 on the DVD side. Fear of Music -- which rivals Remain in Light as the best overall remastering here -- has alternate versions of "Life During Wartime," "Cities," and "Mind," plus the "unfinished outtake" "Dancing for Money," which may have a promising groove, but is as unfinished as it's billed, containing little more than a rhythmic vamp and two basically wordless guide vocals; the DVD side contains two performances from their 1980 appearance on the German TV show Rockpop. Remain in Light has four unfinished outtakes, and the fact that they're not finished should come as no great surprise given the way that the album was recorded from the rhythm tracks up, but all four are excellent, dense rhythmic vamps highlighted by "Fela's Riff," which is so tight there's no room for guide vocals, and the intertwined, trippy "Double Groove" ("Right Start" mutated into "Once in a Lifetime"). The DVD side contains Rockpop appearances from 1980, but not any music videos. Speaking in Tongues has just two bonus tracks: the unfinished "Two Note Swivel," which is closer than anything on Fear of Music or Remain in Light to being completed, since David Byrne actually has words in addition to the melody, plus an alternate "Burning Down the House" that isn't as lively as the finished version; the DVD contains videos for "Burning Down the House" and "This Must Be the Place." Little Creatures contains an early version of "Road to Nowhere" that is much tamer and simpler than the finished version, and an early version of "And She Was" that lacks the pre-chorus and sounds like a rough demo; there's also an extended mix of "Television Man" that was released as a 12" single, plus vidoes of "And She Was" and "Road to Nowhere" on the DVD side. True Stories has an extended mix of "Wild Wild Life" that was originally issued on the original CD version of the album, plus "Papa Legba" and "Radio Head" taken from the film True Stories -- they contain the original Talking Heads backing tracks but are sung by Pops Staples and Tito Larriva, respectively; the DVD has videos for "Wild Wild Life," plus "Love for Sale." Finally, Naked, perhaps appropriately, has the least amount of bonus material, containing just the outtake "Sax and Violins," which was released on the Until the End of the World soundtrack, and the DVD contains the video of it as well. It's a lot of material to get through, and many fans may prefer to wade through it as individual releases, particularly since the bonus material does get less interesting around Speaking in Tongues. They also may feel a little burned because the unreleased songs and alternate takes here are much more compelling than the unreleased material on Once in a Lifetime, and they also may feel burned that not every music video the group did is here, when there clearly was space to fit them in. So, there's plenty to complain about, but there's also plenty to celebrate, since despite it all, this set does deliver the basics: it has the albums in glorious remastered sound, plus good bonus material. The packaging and presentation could have been better, but fans who want to shell out for this very expensive set will at least be satisfied that their desire for improved sound and bonus tracks has finally been fulfilled. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released August 17, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Records

Rhino's -- or, more accurately, Sire/Warner/Rhino's -- Best of Talking Heads follows 2003's box set Once in a Lifetime by a year, and it features the same remastering from that set. It also shares part of a title with the 1992 U.K. compilation The Best of Talking Heads: Once in a Lifetime, which was released the same year as the American double-disc overview Popular Favorites: Sand in the Vaseline. Given the similar titles, similar release dates, and similar track listings, it's easy to get confused at first, but all you need to know is that if you're looking for a comprehensive collection, get the Rhino box, and if you want a disc of hits, get this single-disc Rhino collection. Not that the 2004 Best of Talking Heads has every hit or well-known song -- "I Zimbra," "Born Under Punches," "Crosseyed and Painless," "Swamp," and "Stay Up Late" could all have been here and all are missed -- but at 18 tracks, this is a generous compilation and draws a better portrait of the band than not just the 1992 single-disc compilation, but arguably the patchwork Popular Favorites as well. For the casual fan, this is likely all they'll need to have, and for others, it's a good place to get acquainted with the band. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Punk / New Wave - Released September 3, 1999 | Warner Records

While there's no debating the importance of Jonathan Demme's classic film record of Talking Heads' 1983 tour, the soundtrack released in support of it is a thornier matter. Since its release, purists have found Stop Making Sense slickly mixed and, worse yet, incomprehensive. The nine tracks included jumble and truncate the natural progression of frontman David Byrne's meticulously arranged stage show. Cries for a double-album treatment -- à la 1982's live opus The Name of This Band Is Talking Heads -- were sounded almost immediately; more enterprising fans merely dubbed the VHS release of the film onto cassette tape. So, until a 1999 "special edition" cured the 1984 release's ills, fans had to make do with the Stop Making Sense they were given -- which is, by any account, an exemplary snapshot of a band at the height of its powers. Even with some of his more memorable tics edited out, Byrne is in fine voice here: Never before had he sounded warmer or more approachable, as evidenced by his soaring rendition of "Once in a Lifetime." Though almost half the album focuses on Speaking in Tongues material, the band makes room for one of Byrne's Catherine Wheel tunes (the hard-driving, elliptical "What a Day That Was") as well as up-tempo versions of "Pyscho Killer" and "Take Me to the River." If anything, Stop Making Sense's emphasis on keyboards and rhythm is its greatest asset as well as its biggest failing: Knob-tweakers Chris Frantz and Jerry Harrison play up their parts at the expense of the treblier aspects of the performance, and fans would have to wait almost 15 years for reparations. Still, for a generation that may have missed the band's seminal '70s work, Stop Making Sense proves to be an excellent primer. ~ Michael Hastings
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Rock - Released August 3, 1979 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released July 14, 1978 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Punk / New Wave - Released September 16, 1977 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released June 10, 1985 | Parlophone UK

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Punk / New Wave - Released August 17, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Records

Although most people probably think the only Talking Heads live release is Stop Making Sense, the fact is that there's an earlier, better live album called The Name of This Band Is Talking Heads. Originally released in 1982 on LP and cassette, the album chronicles the growth of the band, both stylistically and personnel-wise. The first LP is the original quartet version of the band, recorded between 1977 and 1979, performing excellent versions of tunes (mostly) off 77 and More Songs About Buildings and Food. Also included were the previously unavailable "A Clean Break" and "Love Goes to a Building on Fire," as well as early versions of "Memories Can't Wait" and "Air." The second LP comes from the Remain in Light tour, recorded in 1980 and 1981. In order to present something close to the music on that album, the original quartet lineup was greatly expanded. Added were two percussionists (Steven Stanley, Jose Rossy), two backup singers (Nona Hendryx, Dollette McDonald), Busta Cherry Jones on bass, Bernie Worrell (!) on keys, and a young Adrian Belew on lead guitar. The excitement of this material is palpable, and the muscular band rips into these tunes with more power than the originals in most cases. "Drugs" gets revamped for live performance, and "Houses in Motion kicks into high gear with a great art-funk coda. Belew is absolutely on fire throughout, especially on "The Great Curve" and "Crosseyed and Painless," where his deranged feedback soloing has never sounded better. At this point in their career, Talking Heads were still basically an underground band; it was "Burning Down the House" that really thrust them into the mainstream, and Stop Making Sense documents their arrival as a more or less mainstream act. The Name of This Band Is Talking Heads captures a hungry band on its way up, performing with a fire that was never matched on later tours. Unfortunately, The Name of This Band Is Talking Heads remained unavailable on compact disc for years, which is a shame since it's arguably one of their finest releases. ~ Sean Westergaard
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Rock - Released October 8, 1980 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released April 15, 1988 | Parlophone UK

Talking Heads' last proper studio album before their protracted breakup finds them returning to the dynamic that produced their best work, with inspired results. As swan songs go, Naked proves to be a pretty good one: Alternately serious and playful, it once again allows frontman David Byrne to worry about the government, the environment, and the plight of the working man as it frees up the rest of the band to trade instruments and work with guest musicians. It's closest in spirit to Remain in Light -- arguably too close: The first side is a collection of funky, syncopated, almost danceable tunes; the second, a murky, darkly philosophical rumination on identity and human nature. The major difference is a Latin influence replacing Light's African rhythm experimentation, most evident on the album openers "Blind" and "Mr. Jones," as well as in drummer Chris Frantz's decision to use brushes and softer percussion instruments (as opposed the big beat sound he offered up on Little Creatures and True Stories). With the venerable Steve Lillywhite behind the boards and such luminaries as Johnny Marr, Kirsty MacColl, and Yves N'Djock punctuating the credits, the album sounds technically perfect, but there's little of the loose, live feel the band achieved with former mentor Brian Eno. It's quite a feat to pull of a late-career album as ambitious as Naked, and the Heads do so with style and vitality. But no matter how much the liner notes may boast of free-form invention and boundless creativity, the album's elegiac, airtight tone betrays the sound of four musicians growing tired of the limits they've imposed on one another. ~ Michael Hastings
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Rock - Released May 31, 1983 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released July 14, 1978 | Rhino - Warner Records

Pop - Released April 14, 1987 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Released September 12, 2011 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released October 7, 1986 | Parlophone UK

Time hasn't been kind to Talking Heads' ancillary soundtrack to David Byrne's oddball directorial debut. Though it generated one of the band's biggest radio hits ("Wild Wild Life"), both the film and its songs were dismissed as self-consciously quirky retreads of other, better material; and it's well-known the quartet was beginning to splinter apart around the time of the sessions. Byrne himself has said that he regretted the whole notion of releasing True Stories with his own vocals, a decision made at the behest of the film's financial backers: All along, he intended for the lyrics to be sung, in character, by Pops Staples, John Goodman, and the rest of the cast. (Some of these alternate-vocal versions were eventually released as B-sides.) Despite its perfunctory nature, however, True Stories is not without its charms. Though an obvious swipe at consumerism, "Love for Sale" boasts one of the band's best hooks, and it's easily their hardest-rocking tune since the Fear of Music days. "Radio Head" is a successful continuation of some of the regional-American motifs Byrne explored on Little Creatures (and bears the distinction of inspiring Thom Yorke, Jonny Greenwood, and company to name their band after it). Free from the movie's weird patina of irony, "Dream Operator" is one of the most affecting tunes Talking Heads ever recorded; the closing-credits theme "City of Dreams" is similarly touching. Elsewhere, there is filler -- touching upon gospel, country-western, zydeco, and sundry other Byrne influences -- but the band's skill at arranging an album and maintaining a mood remains intact. So while True Stories may remain a regrettable chapter in the band's history, it's certainly not an embarrassing one. ~ Michael Hastings
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Pop - Released October 9, 1992 | Rhino - Warner Records

Featuring material from every Talking Heads album except the live The Name of This Band Is Talking Heads, Sand in the Vaseline is a terrific double-disc retrospective of the band's long and varied career. Featuring all of their hit singles and trademark songs ("Psycho Killer," "Take Me to the River," "Burning Down the House," "And She Was," "Once in a Lifetime," "Swamp," "Memories Can't Wait," "Crosseyed and Painless," "Road to Nowhere," "(Nothing But) Flowers," "Life During Wartime"), the set also includes five previously unreleased tracks. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released September 15, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released July 1, 2016 | Anglo Atlantic