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Pop - Released October 8, 1980 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Rock - Released September 16, 1977 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Rock - Released May 31, 1983 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released August 3, 1979 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
By titling their third album Fear of Music and opening it with the African rhythmic experiment "I Zimbra," complete with nonsense lyrics by poet Hugo Ball, Talking Heads make the record seem more of a departure than it is. Though Fear of Music is musically distinct from its predecessors, it's mostly because of the use of minor keys that give the music a more ominous sound. Previously, David Byrne's offbeat observations had been set off by an overtly humorous tone; on Fear of Music, he is still odd, but no longer so funny. At the same time, however, the music has become even more compelling. Worked up from jams (though Byrne received sole songwriter's credit), the music is becoming denser and more driving, notably on the album's standout track, "Life During Wartime," with lyrics that match the music's power. "This ain't no party," declares Byrne, "this ain't no disco, this ain't no fooling around." The other key song, "Heaven," extends the dismissal Byrne had expressed for the U.S. in "The Big Country" to paradise itself: "Heaven is a place where nothing ever happens." It's also the album's most melodic song. Those are the highlights. What keeps Fear of Music from being as impressive an album as Talking Heads' first two is that much of it seems to repeat those earlier efforts, while the few newer elements seem so risky and exciting. It's an uneven, transitional album, though its better songs are as good as any Talking Heads ever did. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Pop - Released July 14, 1978 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released October 8, 1980 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Punk / New Wave - Released September 3, 1999 | Warner Records

While there's no debating the importance of Jonathan Demme's classic film record of Talking Heads' 1983 tour, the soundtrack released in support of it is a thornier matter. Since its release, purists have found Stop Making Sense slickly mixed and, worse yet, incomprehensive. The nine tracks included jumble and truncate the natural progression of frontman David Byrne's meticulously arranged stage show. Cries for a double-album treatment -- à la 1982's live opus The Name of This Band Is Talking Heads -- were sounded almost immediately; more enterprising fans merely dubbed the VHS release of the film onto cassette tape. So, until a 1999 "special edition" cured the 1984 release's ills, fans had to make do with the Stop Making Sense they were given -- which is, by any account, an exemplary snapshot of a band at the height of its powers. Even with some of his more memorable tics edited out, Byrne is in fine voice here: Never before had he sounded warmer or more approachable, as evidenced by his soaring rendition of "Once in a Lifetime." Though almost half the album focuses on Speaking in Tongues material, the band makes room for one of Byrne's Catherine Wheel tunes (the hard-driving, elliptical "What a Day That Was") as well as up-tempo versions of "Pyscho Killer" and "Take Me to the River." If anything, Stop Making Sense's emphasis on keyboards and rhythm is its greatest asset as well as its biggest failing: Knob-tweakers Chris Frantz and Jerry Harrison play up their parts at the expense of the treblier aspects of the performance, and fans would have to wait almost 15 years for reparations. Still, for a generation that may have missed the band's seminal '70s work, Stop Making Sense proves to be an excellent primer. © Michael Hastings /TiVo
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Punk / New Wave - Released August 17, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Released August 17, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released June 10, 1985 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released October 9, 1992 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Released April 15, 1988 | Parlophone UK

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Punk / New Wave - Released September 16, 1977 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released October 7, 1986 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released May 31, 1983 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Released September 12, 2011 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released July 14, 1978 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Released September 15, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released September 4, 2015 | FMIC

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Rock - Released July 1, 2016 | Anglo Atlantic