Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES€15.99
CD€11.49

Sacred Vocal Music - Released October 12, 2010 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica - Exceptional Sound Recording - Hi-Res Audio
The British vocal ensemble Stile Antico was established in 2001 and within its first decade has been acknowledged as one of the very finest early music groups, with multiple Grammy nominations, as well as Gramophone and Diapason d'or Awards. This album, Puer natus est: Tudor Music for Advent and Christmas, received a Diapason d'or Award in October 2010. One thing that sets this group apart from similar ensembles is the fact that it works without a conductor, making aesthetic decisions together and listening very, very closely to each for balance and tempos. It's possible to hear the singers' commitment to each other in their attentiveness to the subtlest nuances in dynamics and pacing. Their approach is ideal for this repertoire, English Renaissance polyphony, which demands intense concentration, absolutely secure intonation, and a carefully balanced blend to make its full impact. The centerpiece of the album is Thomas Tallis' incomplete Christmas mass, Missa Puer natus est, of which only three movements were written. The recording opens with Tallis' Advent motet, Videte miraculum, and includes four of William Byrd's settings of the Propers of the Mass, a Magnificat by Robert White, motets by John Tavener and John Sheppard, as well as the plainchant on which Tallis' mass is based. The mass movements are separated by the propers and motets, as would have been done in a liturgical setting. The gain in performance authenticity is tempered by the loss of continuity of hearing the mass as a complete unit. The flow of the selections is pleasant, but this ordering makes it hard to keep track of the unity of Tallis' work. Stile Antico sings with phenomenally pure tone. The women's voices have the chaste clarity associated with boys' voices, but deployed with a technical assurance and musical sensitivity beyond that of most boys. The sound of the ensemble is ravishing in its warmth and the evenness of its blend. The performances are expressive, but never idiosyncratically so; the singers have no interpretive agenda other than letting the composers' voices be heard as beautifully and authentically as possible. The sound of Harmonia Mundi's hybrid SACD is clear, absolutely clean, and suffused with warmth. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€31.29
CD€22.29

Sacred Vocal Music - Released August 26, 2013 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
From
CD€11.49

Classical - Released April 14, 2009 | harmonia mundi

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Award - Choc de Classica
The members of the British vocal ensemble Stile Antico, founded in 2001, have an exceptionally pure and youthful sound. In previous albums the group has explored English music of the Renaissance, and here it turns to sixteenth and early seventeenth settings of texts from the Song of Songs by a variety of continental composers. The selections include some of the masterworks of high Renaissance polyphony, including music by Nicolas Gombert, Orlande de Lassus, Jacob Clemens non Papa, Francisco Guerrero, Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, and Tomás Luis de Victoria. The works by lesser composers, including Jean Lhéritier, Rodrigo de Ceballos, and Sebastián de Vivanco are no less impressive and affecting, especially in performances as polished and attentive as these. The elaborately polyphonic textures that prevail are effectively shown off and are kept from becoming too much of a good thing because they are interspersed with monophonic plainchant antiphons that serve as refreshing aural palate cleansers. The ensemble sings with immaculate intonation and an impressively broad expressive range. The group works without a conductor, and the sensitivity and attention that that demands of each member pays off beautifully in these performances, where they seem to operate as a single organic entity. The sound of the SACD is clean, but atmospheric and nicely ambient. The only caveat is that, through some anomaly of recording, some initial consonants, particularly "s" and "ch," have a percussive punch that works against the prevailing tone of smooth serenity. © TiVo
From
CD€11.49

Sacred Vocal Music - Released January 16, 2007 | harmonia mundi

Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - Choc du Monde de la Musique
This gorgeous release by the young English unaccompanied vocal group Stile Antico would be worth your time and money simply for the quiet, perfectly intoned singing on display here. But the album accomplishes more than vocal virtuosity. Stile Antico presents music by three generations of English choral composers, all of it from the Catholic sphere and all of it written for the late-evening Compline services of the liturgical day. That programming decision results in a collection of music that wouldn't have been heard in the sixteenth century (the older music of Sheppard probably wouldn't have lasted until the century's end) but that does make sense to the modern listener trying to learn to hear this music with Renaissance ears. The reason is that the program is ideally structured to lead the listener from Sheppard (and his contemporary Hugh Aston) to Thomas Tallis and his musical heir, William Byrd. The disc opens with a two-section "Libera nos" by Sheppard, rich and dense. It moves on to one of Byrd's sparsest compositions, the hymn "Christe, qui lux es et dies," which ironically seems to have been influenced by the severe homophony of Anglican service music. Sheppard is generously represented, and this disc is strongly recommended to anyone who has been intrigued with his music but has felt overwhelmed by an entire disc's worth of it -- it seems to give the modern listener little to hang on to, but when placed in contrast with the more ordered works of Tallis and Byrd it seems luxuriant. The program is tied together as well by the Compline themes, which lend the entire album a meditative cast that will appeal to casual listeners as strongly as it will to closely attentive ones. This is superb choral singing that stands out from the crowd of recordings of unaccompanied English music of the sixteenth century. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€31.29
CD€22.29

Classical - Released March 9, 2018 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice
The Tenebræ responsories come from an immense collection of polyphonic music for Holy Week, the Officium Hebdomadæ Sanctæ, published by Victoria in 1585, which brings together several pieces written during the twenty years he spent in Rome. The responsories, brought together here, form part of a much longer Tenebræ, which essentially combined the monastic Hours of matins and lauds, for each of the final three days of the Holy Week. One of the characteristic traits of this service consists in the progressive extinguishing of fifteen votive candles until the church is finally plunged into the darkness from which the ceremony draws its name. The responsory is one part of a much broader liturgy, which was for the most part sung in plainsong. The musical richness of Victoria's polyphonic compositions made a striking contrast to this liturgy. Such an effect is harder to effect in concert, or even on a recording, where we are outside the liturgical context: here, we have uninterrupted polyphony. While the music is very varied, the uninterrupted use of the same mode and the same textures in three or four pieces throughout these 18 Responsories could, at times, give the impression that one is listening to a single piece. To counteract that impression, here and there the Stile Antico vocal ensemble has introduced extracts from readings of the Lamentations, sung in plainsong at the end of each Responsory. And so the contrast is restored. The programme closes with the luminous and oh-so-soothing six-voice motet for Holy Week O Domine Jesu Christi, again published in Rome in 1576. © SM/Qobuz
From
HI-RES€9.49
CD€6.49

Classical - Released November 13, 2012 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES€31.29
CD€22.29

Sacred Vocal Music - Released February 14, 2012 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES€31.29
CD€22.29

Classical - Released September 22, 2014 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Classical - Released January 29, 2021 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Josquin des Prés, who died exactly five centuries ago (1521) in Condé-sur-l'Escaut (in today's Hauts de France region near Valenciennes), is one of the great figures of the Franco-Flemish school and one of the greatest composers in the history of Western music. The reputation of this musician-traveller spread throughout Europe during his lifetime and he was known in Burgundy, France and throughout Italy. He was a member of the Pope's Chapel in Rome, after having assumed offices in Milan and Ferrara in the service of the Sforza family. Widely distributed thanks to the invention of the printing press, his music has survived, in the form of over two hundred and forty works. This album is part of a trilogy of recordings planned by Decca to constitute a portrait of Josquin des Prés according to current practices and knowledge. Recorded in July 2020 by the Stile Antico ensemble, it presents master works: the sublime Messe Pange lingua, with motets and songs, including Vivrai-je tousjours, recorded here for the first time. Coming from the English choral tradition of Oxford and Cambridge, Stile Antico offers us a decanted vision, out of time and stripped of any sensuality, as if to better emphasise the abstraction of Josquin's harmonic research. © François Hudry/Qobuz
From
HI-RES€15.99
CD€11.49

Sacred Vocal Music - Released February 13, 2007 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES€31.29
CD€22.29

Classical - Released October 15, 2015 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
From
HI-RES€31.29
CD€22.29

Sacred Vocal Music - Released January 11, 2019 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
The regime of Queen Elizabeth I dealt harshly with supporters of the old Catholic religion. Torn between obedience and conscience, some of England’s most talented musicians – Philips, Dering and Dowland – chose a life of exile abroad. Others chose to remain in spiritual isolation in England, comparing themselves to the exiled Israelites in Babylon. Amongst them were Robert White, whose five-part Lamentations are one of the glories of English music of any age, and William Byrd, whose anguished Catholic music is referenced in Shakespeare’s enigmatic poem The Phoenix and the Turtle, vividly set by Huw Watkins especially for stile antico. © harmonia mundi
From
CD€11.49

Sacred Vocal Music - Released April 5, 2013 | harmonia mundi

Distinctions Diapason d'or
From
HI-RES€15.99
CD€11.49

Sacred Vocal Music - Released September 2, 2010 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
John Sheppard is a mysterious figure in 17th century English music; born around the time Henry VII defeated the Scots at the Battle of Flodden Field, no record of him is known until the time of the Third Succession Act of 1543, when he is identified as a choral instructor at Oxford. In 1548 Sheppard was named a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal and worked side by side with Thomas Tallis to create both English service anthems during the reign of Edward VI and Catholic service music in the service of Mary Tudor. Sheppard's greatest achievements were made in Latin settings, and he barely survived as an outbreak of the plague in 1558 carried him off. While his surviving output is not insubstantial, none of it was published in his lifetime and many of the source manuscripts are lacking elements and require patient editorial attention. This is partly why Sheppard is considered off the beaten track while Tallis is the best-known English composer of his era. However, Sheppard's music is of equal merit, a case that singing group stile antico makes very well on its Harmonia Mundi release Media vita and other liturgical works. The largest work on the program -- and arguably the largest English Latin-texted setting in sheer length of the 17th century -- is the title work, the enormous six-voice, 25 minutes long motet Media vita, sung here with absolute perfection by stile antico. This is only the fourth recording of the work made and it's easy to see why; it is so long and difficult for the chorus, yet when one lets it take over it is nearly as though the music itself, in stained glass colors, is rising up the sides of the walls. By highlighting this work and in using "Media vita" as the name above the door, stile antico is inviting direct comparison to the Tallis Scholars, who also used that device on the groundbreaking 1989 album on Gimell, the first ever devoted to Sheppard alone. However, among the remaining content there is nothing in common between the two discs, and the Tallis Scholars did not choose to explore any of the English anthems, which stile antico does here; "Christ rising again" is especially effective, and appears to be new to recordings. Anyone who loves Tallis, or has a deep-seated appreciation of English renaissance music in general, will not fail to find edification in this fine disc. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€31.29
CD€22.29

Classical - Released January 27, 2017 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
From
CD€8.49

Classical - Released June 8, 2015 | harmonia mundi

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
From
HI-RES€31.29
CD€22.29

Classical - Released October 25, 2019 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet
A glance at the program of this Christmas release by the small (10-voice) choir Stile Antico might not seem to promise much: several of the pieces, notably the opening O magnum mysterium of Victoria, are probably familiar to anyone who has sung in a collegiate choir or glee club. Look, and listen, more closely, and you'll find a program that's intelligently varied, and quite well put together. One noticeable aspect is the inclusion of semi-popular Spanish material (in Spanish), which was ignored when the canon of Spanish Renaissance music was formed but is increasingly coming into view in the works of composers like Mateo Flecha, represented twice here. One of his works is worth the price of the album by itself: the fascinating El Jubilate (sample this) is a sort of potpourri of the sacred and popular styles. Never forgotten was the villancico Ríu Ríu Chíu, which persists to this day as a Christmas carol in Spanish lands (the Monkees even recorded it once). Much of the rest of the program is devoted to a Christmas mass by Alonso Lobo, the Missa Beata Dei genitrix Maria, which is dispersed through the program and surrounded by relevant motets, Renaissance-fashion. Everything is sung with both festivity and precision by Stile Antico, which here adds to its reputation for albums that are at once rigorous, innovative, and accessible to anyone. Appropriate and clear sound from London's All Hallows' Church adds to the attractiveness of the whole. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€31.29
CD€22.29

Classical - Released October 15, 2015 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet
From
CD€14.99

Classical - Released January 29, 2021 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

Josquin des Prés, who died exactly five centuries ago (1521) in Condé-sur-l'Escaut (in today's Hauts de France region near Valenciennes), is one of the great figures of the Franco-Flemish school and one of the greatest composers in the history of Western music. The reputation of this musician-traveller spread throughout Europe during his lifetime and he was known in Burgundy, France and throughout Italy. He was a member of the Pope's Chapel in Rome, after having assumed offices in Milan and Ferrara in the service of the Sforza family. Widely distributed thanks to the invention of the printing press, his music has survived, in the form of over two hundred and forty works. This album is part of a trilogy of recordings planned by Decca to constitute a portrait of Josquin des Prés according to current practices and knowledge. Recorded in July 2020 by the Stile Antico ensemble, it presents master works: the sublime Messe Pange lingua, with motets and songs, including Vivrai-je tousjours, recorded here for the first time. Coming from the English choral tradition of Oxford and Cambridge, Stile Antico offers us a decanted vision, out of time and stripped of any sensuality, as if to better emphasise the abstraction of Josquin's harmonic research. © François Hudry/Qobuz