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Blues - Released January 25, 2013 | Epic - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
It's hard to overestimate the impact Stevie Ray Vaughan's debut, Texas Flood, had upon its release in 1983. At that point, blues was no longer hip, the way it was in the '60s. Texas Flood changed all that, climbing into the Top 40 and spending over half a year on the charts, which was practically unheard of for a blues recording. Vaughan became a genuine star and, in doing so, sparked a revitalization of the blues. This was a monumental impact, but his critics claimed that, no matter how prodigious Vaughan's instrumental talents were, he didn't forge a distinctive voice; instead, he wore his influences on his sleeve, whether it was Albert King's pinched yet muscular soloing or Larry Davis' emotive singing. There's a certain element of truth in that, but that was sort of the point of Texas Flood. Vaughan didn't hide his influences; he celebrated them, pumping fresh blood into a familiar genre. When Vaughan and Double Trouble cut the album over the course of three days in 1982, he had already played his set lists countless times; he knew how to turn this material inside out or goose it up for maximum impact. The album is paced like a club show, kicking off with Vaughan's two best self-penned songs, "Love Struck Baby" and "Pride and Joy," then settling into a pair of covers, the slow-burning title track and an exciting reading of Howlin' Wolf's "Tell Me," before building to the climax of "Dirty Pool" and "I'm Crying." Vaughan caps the entire thing with "Lenny," a lyrical, jazzy tribute to his wife. It becomes clear that Vaughan's true achievement was finding something personal and emotional by fusing different elements of his idols. Sometimes the borrowing was overt, and other times subtle, but it all blended together into a style that recalled the past while seizing the excitement and essence of the present. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Blues - Released October 24, 2014 | Epic

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Blues - Released July 26, 2010 | Epic - Legacy

Distinctions Prises de son d'exception
Stevie Ray Vaughan's second album, Couldn't Stand the Weather, pretty much did everything a second album should do: it confirmed that the acclaimed debut was no fluke, while matching, if not bettering, the sales of its predecessor, thereby cementing Vaughan's status as a giant of modern blues. So why does it feel like a letdown? Perhaps because it simply offers more of the same, all the while relying heavily on covers. Of the eight songs, half are covers, while two of his four originals are instrumentals -- not necessarily a bad thing, but it gives the impression that Vaughan threw the album together in a rush, even if he didn't. Nevertheless, Couldn't Stand the Weather feels a bit like a holding pattern, since there's no elaboration on Double Trouble's core sound and no great strides forward, whether it's in Vaughan's songwriting or musicianship. Still, as holding patterns go, it's a pretty enjoyable one, since Vaughan and Double Trouble play spiritedly throughout the record. With its swaggering, stuttering riff, the title track ranks as one of Vaughan's classics, and thanks to a nuanced vocal, he makes W.C. Clark's "Cold Shot" his own. The instrumentals -- the breakneck Lonnie Mack-styled "Scuttle Buttin'" and "Stang's Swang," another effective demonstration of Vaughan's jazz inclinations -- work well, even if the original shuffle "Honey Bee" fails to make much of an impression and the cover of "Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)" is too reminiscent of Jimi Hendrix's original. So, there aren't many weaknesses on the record, aside from the suspicion that Vaughan didn't really push himself as hard as he could have, and the feeling that if he had, he would have come up with something a bit stronger. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Blues - Released October 24, 2014 | Epic - Legacy

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Blues - Released October 1, 2002 | Epic - Legacy

Epic's The Essential Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble gathers two discs' worth of the late blues guitarist's work, including many live performances and a few tracks with the Vaughan Brothers. The collection presents Vaughan's material in roughly chronological order, from the 1980 live recording "Shake for Me" to 1989's "Life by the Drop." It also touches on most of Vaughan's definitive songs and performances, including "Tightrope," "Wall of Denial," "Couldn't Stand the Weather," and "Cold Shot," and live versions of "The Sky Is Crying," "Superstition," and "Rude Mood/Hide Away." Though this album doesn't offer anything that hasn't already been released in some form or another, it does go into slightly more depth than several of the other Stevie Ray Vaughan retrospectives by presenting both his greatest studio hits and some of his best live work. ~ Heather Phares
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Blues - Released November 5, 1991 | Epic

The posthumously assembled ten-track outtakes collection The Sky Is Crying actually proves to be one of Stevie Ray Vaughan's most consistent albums, rivaling In Step as the best outside of the Greatest Hits collection. These songs were recorded in sessions spanning from 1984's Couldn't Stand the Weather to 1989's In Step and were left off of the LPs for whatever reason (or, in the case of Soul to Soul's "Empty Arms," a different version was used). What makes the record work is its eclectic diversity -- Vaughan plays slide guitar on "Boot Hill" and acoustic on "Life by the Drop"; he smokes on the slow blues of "May I Have a Talk With You" and the title track just as much as on the up-tempo Lonnie Mack cover, "Wham"; and he shows the jazzy side of his playing on Hendrix's "Little Wing" and Kenny Burrell's "Chitlins Con Carne." But it's not just musical diversity that makes the record work, it's also Vaughan's emotional range. From the morbidly dark "Boot Hill" to the lilting "Little Wing" to the exuberant tributes to his influences -- Lonnie Mack on "Wham" and Albert King on "The Sky Is Crying" -- Vaughan makes the material resonate, and in light of his death, "The Sky Is Crying" and the touching survivor-story ballad "Life by the Drop" are two of the most moving moments in Vaughan's oeuvre. ~ Steve Huey
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Blues - Released October 24, 2014 | Epic - Legacy

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Blues - Released August 30, 2013 | Sony Music Media

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Blues - Released October 15, 2014 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res Booklet
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Blues - Released November 20, 2001 | Epic - Legacy

Live at Montreux 1982 & 1985 is a historically significant recording, presenting Stevie Ray Vaughan in the biggest show of his life to that date, then three years later, once he had become a star. The 1982 show is essentially the show that got his career started. He met both Jackson Browne and David Bowie after his set, and they were so impressed that Browne volunteered use of his studio (for free!) for Stevie to record what would become his debut album, and Bowie recruited him as lead guitarist for the Let's Dance album and tour (alas, the tour was not to be). However, not everyone was so impressed. In fact, there are choruses of boos that follow nearly every tune. Vaughan was basically a nobody at the time, playing very electric blues at the end of a mostly acoustic program. But he had done enough bar gigs to completely rise above it, and he plays with the passion and hunger of a young musician getting his big chance. He's not really an engaging frontman at this point in his career, but man, can he play that guitar. And he simply never lets up. Even at this stage, his tone and style are pretty close to fully formed, and it's easy to see how he could become the guitar hero he ended up being. The 1985 show is quite a contrast. Vaughan had become a star, and it shows in so many ways. He had developed more of a stage persona, with showier moves and infinitely more presence as a frontman. Double Trouble also now included Reese Wynans on keyboards, which, along with Vaughan's addition of a wah-wah pedal, really expanded the sound. Vaughan has many fiery moments on this set as well, but he also loses focus during several solos, and seems more than content to share or even hand over the spotlight to fellow Texas guitar legend Johnny Copeland. Vaughan seems a bit worn out, and it wouldn't be long before he got sober. Even so, there are clear moments of brilliance and this time the audience is fully behind him. Live at Montreux 1982 & 1985 is a vital document for fans, showing the raw ingredients that would make him a star, then comparing it to what happened once he got there. It's a great look at the rise of one of rock's most revered guitar players. ~ Sean Westergaard
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Blues - Released February 10, 2010 | Sony BMG Music Entertainment

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Blues - Released November 30, 2007 | Sony BMG Music Entertainment

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Blues - Released September 4, 2015 | FMIC

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Blues - Released March 23, 1999 | Epic

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Blues - Released May 20, 2015 | 2015 Autarc Media GmbH, CH.

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Blues - Released January 14, 2008 | Epic - Legacy

Upon first glance, Epic/Legacy's 2007 collection Solos, Sessions & Encores might seem like little more than bottom-of-the-barrel scrapings, the last possible release that could be cobbled together from Stevie Ray Vaughan's plundered vaults. After all, this consists entirely of recordings where SRV was either a guest or a sideman, taking a spotlight on-stage or stepping into a studio to lay down a solo, and for many musicians such extracurricular activity is often tossed off, so it wouldn't add much to their legacy. Not so for Stevie Ray Vaughan. Part of his legend is built upon his boundless love for playing, of which his solo work and albums with Double Trouble was just part of the picture, so the 14 tracks on Solos, Sessions & Encores help fill out the details as everything from a previously unreleased 1978 cut with his former lover Lou Ann Barton to live recordings from ten years later is collected. Roughly half of this disc is previously unreleased -- including a blistering "Albert's Shuffle" with Albert Collins, a low-down "Change It" with Jimmie Vaughan, and a slow, smoldering "Texas Flood" where Bonnie Raitt stands toe to toe with Stevie -- but the unearthed gems matter less than the context. By collecting all this stray material, ranging from straight-up blues sessions like Marcia Ball's "Soulful Dress" to SRV's big breakthrough on David Bowie's "Let's Dance," this album showcases Vaughan's range and generosity as a player. Here, his skill for mimicry seems sympathetic, as he can allude to the right player at the right time in a variety of settings, all the while without ever abandoning his style. Plus, there's just some fantastic playing here, highlighted by a ferocious "Goin' Down" with Jeff Beck and a version of "The Sky Is Crying" with Albert and B.B. King. As sheer music, this is very enjoyable, but Solos, Sessions & Encores is most noteworthy for how it finally fills out SRV's legacy by capturing what a giving guitarist he was -- based on this, there are few who function better as a sideman than he. It may feel a bit like a fifth disc in a box set rather than its own standalone compilation, but Solos, Sessions & Encores is nevertheless a welcome addition to his catalog. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Blues - Released September 7, 2009 | Epic

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Rock - Released December 1, 2017 | Northern Quarter