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Progressive Rock - Released July 10, 2020 | Otsego Entertainment Group

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Metal - Released March 19, 1999 | Warner Records

Fast, cheap, and out of control. This is gutbucket thrash for the most jaded of teenaged parking lot dwellers. After just a few minutes of throbbing power chords and Wayne Static's drunken sailor bellowing you may be ready to end it all, yet there is an undeniable hook to the chunky gloom this band pours out. If that's how you feel, this could be right up your dead-end alley. © Tim Sheridan /TiVo
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Hard Rock - Released May 22, 2001 | Warner Records

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Hard Rock - Released October 7, 2003 | Warner Records

Static-X's Shadow Zone is a numbingly vacuous, no-dimensional dud that seems to have arrived via wormhole from 1998. In songs like "Kill Your Idols," "Destroy All," and "Monster," Wayne Static -- who's never sounded more like Korn's Jonathan Davis -- yells nonsense like "My head's a loaded gun" and "Breathing, killing, seething, willing" over thudding, one-note thrash busied up with dated electronic fuzz. Producer Josh Abraham (Orgy, Crazy Town) flattens the material to a harsh hiss, reducing the drumming to a vague click behind an impenetrable wall of guitars, and eventually it all just sounds like, yes, static. By mid-album, "The Only"'s foray into Stabbing Westward-style electro-industrial provides depth simply by being derivative in a different way. (Even here, Static's vocal resemblance to Davis is stunning.) Reliance on formula has always been admissible in metal, but it's Static-X's apparent refusal to try anything new or remotely original that makes Shadow Zone such a disappointment. Predictably, the album ends clumsily. "So" and "Invincible" debut some sort of double-track effect on Static's voice, which makes him sound like Layne Staley instead of Davis. Along with the interlude "Transmission," which probably seemed a lot scarier in the studio, the two tracks are a final indictor of Static-X's quickly advancing irrelevance. Shadow Zone's impossibly generic cover art only makes it more indistinguishable. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 13, 2009 | Reprise

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Progressive Rock - Released May 15, 2020 | Otsego Entertainment Group

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Hard Rock - Released April 2, 2007 | Reprise

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Hard Rock - Released June 14, 2005 | Warner Records

Static-X's 2003 album Shadow Zone was a mess. Trying too blatantly to match wits with Korn and searching blindly for depth in electronics and processed drums, it tried desperately to expand on the sound of Machine and Wisconsin Death Trip, and that flawed ambition was its biggest problem. The early material was grating and one-dimensional, but it had a certain primal flair for the very same reasons -- songs were really an afterthought in the face of its blistering howl. Frontman Wayne Static seems to have figured that out with 2005's Start a War, and he's aided by the thick and hoary tone of original guitarist Koichi Fukada, who's rejoined the fold after the forced departure of Tripp Eisen. (This is also the band's first recording with former tour-only drummer Nick Oshiro.) From the beginning, War lights into a guttural guitar strut over refreshing live drumming and doesn't let up, masking Static's laughably atrocious lyrics (keywords: destroy, kill, hate, fall, terror, self-destruct) with an unrelenting roar. Imagine the sewage wind flowing though an abandoned subway line, or a thousand first-person shooters cranked to full volume, and that's the effect of "Enemy," "I'm the One," the screeching "Start a War," and "Dirthouse." The latter suffers from weird tattletale intonation in the vocal. However, its harsh snare reports are brilliant, and the billowing electronic throbs and sirens make it sound like White Zombie idling at a starting line. It's not a new sound, not anywhere near, and Start a War inevitably falters. It can't survive on a diet of enormous guitar tone alone. But at least Static-X is having fun making this stuff, and in its best moments the album is a raucous, hedonistic chortle, a crinkling PVC lark, an industrial thrash waste valve blaring deafening nothingness into the inky night sky. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Hard Rock - Released July 13, 2004 | Warner Records

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Hard Rock - Released June 14, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Static-X's 2003 album Shadow Zone was a mess. Trying too blatantly to match wits with Korn and searching blindly for depth in electronics and processed drums, it tried desperately to expand on the sound of Machine and Wisconsin Death Trip, and that flawed ambition was its biggest problem. The early material was grating and one-dimensional, but it had a certain primal flair for the very same reasons -- songs were really an afterthought in the face of its blistering howl. Frontman Wayne Static seems to have figured that out with 2005's Start a War, and he's aided by the thick and hoary tone of original guitarist Koichi Fukada, who's rejoined the fold after the forced departure of Tripp Eisen. (This is also the band's first recording with former tour-only drummer Nick Oshiro.) From the beginning, War lights into a guttural guitar strut over refreshing live drumming and doesn't let up, masking Static's laughably atrocious lyrics (keywords: destroy, kill, hate, fall, terror, self-destruct) with an unrelenting roar. Imagine the sewage wind flowing though an abandoned subway line, or a thousand first-person shooters cranked to full volume, and that's the effect of "Enemy," "I'm the One," the screeching "Start a War," and "Dirthouse." The latter suffers from weird tattletale intonation in the vocal. However, its harsh snare reports are brilliant, and the billowing electronic throbs and sirens make it sound like White Zombie idling at a starting line. It's not a new sound, not anywhere near, and Start a War inevitably falters. It can't survive on a diet of enormous guitar tone alone. But at least Static-X is having fun making this stuff, and in its best moments the album is a raucous, hedonistic chortle, a crinkling PVC lark, an industrial thrash waste valve blaring deafening nothingness into the inky night sky. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Hard Rock - Released September 2, 2003 | Warner Records

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Rock - Released October 6, 2008 | Reprise

Having stunned and awed audiences for nearly 15 years, the industrial-metal menace known as Static-X unveils its first official live DVD, CANNIBAL KILLERS LIVE. Featuring a 17-track set filmed in Spokane, Washington, in early 2007, the DVD captures Static-X at its rampaging, furious best. Filmed in 4:3 fullscreen and mastered in Dolby 5.1 Surround Sound, CANNIBAL KILLERS LIVE also features all 12 of the band’s videos spanning Static-X’s entire career as well as a bonus CD containing the audio portion of the live program. © TiVo
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Progressive Rock - Released February 7, 2020 | Otsego Entertainment Group

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Hard Rock - Released April 2, 2007 | Warner Records

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Rock - Released March 16, 2009 | Reprise