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Pop - Released November 7, 1973 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Rock - Released September 25, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

A comprehensive collection of the group's singles from 1970 to 1991, Cum On Feel the Hitz compiles the best of English rock outfit Slade. Released both as a double-CD and a two-LP set, the collection contains all of the group's number one U.K. singles, alongside 16 Top Ten singles. © TiVo
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Pop - Released September 28, 1973 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Falling somewhere between the glam of T.Rex and the hard rock of Nazareth, Slade's finest moments came with arena rockers "Cum on Feel the Noize," "Mama Weer All Crazee Now," and "Gudbye t' Jayne," songs specifically written to be strong live numbers that would get kids up off their seats. Sladest is a "best-of" collection that includes all of the material that helped the band sell tons of records and fill arenas in the U.K. in the early '70s. When Slade stray from their successful formula of catchy guitar riffs and big choruses -- with soft rockers like "Coz I Luv You" and "Pouk Hill" -- they tend to fall flat. © Paul Tinelli /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 1, 1972 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Slade might have built its everywhere-but-America fame upon a succession of gut-tearing hit singles, but the band's true rocking credentials were on display elsewhere, in the second to none stage show that had already been preserved on the epochal Slade Alive! earlier in 1972 and across the chain of storming B-sides that had accompanied the smashes so far. Slayed? may have been only the band's second studio album in four years, but it reinforced that barrage with enough mighty stompers that the band could have taken the next year off and still not run out of steam. Even if one excises past hits "Gudbuy t' Jane" and "Mama Weer All Crazee Now" from the equation, Slayed? is a nonstop party, from the riotously self-fulfilling prophecy of "The Whole World's Goin' Crazee" to the down-key but still eminently stompalong-able "Look at Last Nite," the latter a reminder that, even at its loudest, Slade was still capable of some fetching balladry. Or should that be the other way around? The tomahawk riffing of "I Won't Let It 'Appen Again" is another highlight -- a similar arrangement was later borrowed, to excellent effect, for sometime support band Blue Öyster Cult's version of another Slade favorite, the rocker anthem "Born to Be Wild," while "Gudbuy Gudbuy" lurches like a battalion of tanks and matches a stirring Dave Hill guitar break to one of Noddy Holder's coolest-ever vocals. A couple of covers break the Holder/Lea songwriting domination. A bass-heavy blues boogie through Janis Joplin's "Move Over had graced a Slade BBC session earlier in the year, and provoked such a great response that they had no option but to re-record it, while the closing medley of "Let the Good Times Roll" and "Feel So Fine" was the closest you could come to the mania of a Slade live show without actually going out and buying a ticket. Of course, listeners don't have that option today. But stick on Slayed?, crank the volume well up -- and the whole world will be going crazee all over again. © Dave Thompson /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 13, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Rock - Released March 15, 1976 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Nobody's Fools has some really great songs on it, but all things considered it was the band's worst album at that point (at least under the name Slade). Basically misguided from the get-go, Nobody's Fools is constantly trying to free itself from the oppressive production and arrangements. Slade had been living in the U.S.A. for a couple of years at this point. Their mega-success everywhere else in the world was never duplicated here in the U.S. While they were here and trying to figure out how to crack the American market, someone came up with the brilliant idea of making a record with a "California" sound. Unfortunately, not meaning Montrose or the Flamin' Groovies -- that would've been cool. No, this means the dreaded Eagles and Jackson Browne. Many of the numbers on this record are loaded with Dobros, mandos, and female background vocals, and, frankly, it just doesn't work. As was stated before, the album does have some really strong material (though not as consistent as usual). The title track is excellent, but marred by a bad arrangement. "Do The Dirty" is a foot-stomping rocker with a little funkiness thrown in for good measure. The album's best track is "Get on Up," which has an absolutely brutal riff. Check out the version on Slade Alive II if you want the straight-up version. "Scratch My Back" is pure Slade, even with the out of place arrangement. And "Let's Call It Quits" is a real screamer where Noddy Holder coughs up a great vocal. Ironically, the band was really hitting its stride as a seasoned live act, but that didn't matter much, since this album accelerated the drift toward irrelevancy. The world would again awake to the power of a rock & roll good time, but it would take several years. For the fan, this album is worth it for several of the tunes. For the uninitiated, skip this one -- all in all, it's not one of their best. © Geoff Ginsberg /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1974 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Slade in Flame is a tough album to judge. It marks the end of Slade's rule over the British charts -- the album went to number six (the band's previous four LPs reached number one), but it would be nearly ten years before the band would return to the top of the pops. Made as an accompanying piece to the movie of the same name, Slade in Flame was different than the group's other records. It's an artistic tour de force for a band that was looked on as "just a good time." Although Slade was that, the band had a lot more in its bag of tricks, and this album shows it. Most folks (if not all) were expecting Slade to come out with a Monkees-type movie: lots of slapstick and a funny, lighthearted good time. Instead, the band delivered a much more reality-based film and album. Don't worry, though, because it's still pure Slade. The album stretches the band's stylistic universe to include brass and more keyboards than before. The lyrics are a little more serious than you might expect -- the album is about what a bummer it can be to be famous, as well as the all of the advantages (girls). From the opening number, "How Does It Feel," Slade sets a different tone. A piano and vocal intro greets the listener. Of course, by the end of the song the full band is rocking furiously. They don't let up on the classic "Them Kinda Monkeys Can't Swing," which features great drumming by Don Powell. "So Far So Good" is a beautiful rocker, and was covered by Alice Cooper songwriter Mike Bruce on his first solo album. On "OK Yesterday Was Yesterday," Noddy gives his lungs a big-time workout. [The British and American versions of this album differ slightly. The U.S. version added two British A-sides, "Bangin' Man" and "Thanks for the Memories," while deleting a couple of tracks. "Bangin' Man" is definitely one of Slade's best, and worth seeking out on a greatest-hits CD.] © Geoff Ginsberg /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 27, 1972 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Pop - Released December 3, 1983 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Pop - Released February 15, 1974 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

It took Slade two years and one hits-and-rarities compilation (Sladest) to get around to following up 1972's U.K. chart-topping Slayed?, two years during which the entire complexion of the band had altered dramatically. No longer the rampant yobs out on the stomp of yore, the quartet members placed the rabble-rousing bombast of old far behind them during 1974, and switched their songwriting efforts to more mellow pastures -- the gentle "Everyday," the yearning "Far Far Away," and the decidedly pretty "Miles Out to Sea." Old New Borrowed and Blue was the album that introduced the chrysalis to its audience -- not that you'd know it from the opening bellow. Riding a raw guitar line based, very loosely, around the guttural riffing of the Beatles' "Birthday," "Just a Little Bit" cranks in with almost metallic dynamics, even retaining the in-concert ad-libbing that had long since made it a highlight of the live show. "We're Gonna Raise the Roof," "When the Lights Are Out," and "My Town," too, offer little that Slade wasn't already well renowned for and that, perhaps, was what the bandmembers were thinking as well. The glitter-soaked thunderclap was old news now; they could write those rockers in their sleep. The vaudeville piano-led "Find Yourself a Rainbow," though, was new territory altogether, while the country-rock-inflected "How Can It Be" posited a direction that Holder himself admitted had long been a regular on his home turntable. It was "Everyday," however, that held the secret of the band's future, a crowd-swaying singalong of such scarf-waving majesty that it might well be single-handedly responsible for every great record U2 has ever made. It was certainly Slade's most memorable new single in a while and, as the cue for further airborne anthems, it became one of the most crucial songs in the group's entire repertoire. On an album that, at best, can be described as patchy, "Everyday" is a new day altogether. © Dave Thompson /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 9, 1969 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Inaugurating Union Square's much-praised series of Slade reissues and compilations, this single-disc gathering of the band's first two albums represents one of the must-have bargains of the CD age, two solidly excellent albums that were surely combined only because both are so underrated that they might otherwise have been lost. Representing the band as it struggled to come to grips with its own talent, with the Noddy Holder/Jim Lea songwriting team of the future more likely to be supplanted by Lea and Don Powell, 26 tracks round up both LPs, plus two non-album singles, "Wild Winds Are Blowing" and the debut hit "Get Down and Get with It." There is little here that will strike an immediate chord with listeners who know only the hits. Dig deeper, however, and any number of Slade classics are on hand, beginning with Beginnings' opening instrumental, "Genesis" -- which reappears later in the set as Play It Loud's "Know Who You Are." "Dapple Rose," "One Way Hotel," "Pouk Hill," and covers of "The Shape of Things to Come" and "Journey to the Centre of Your Mind" are all dynamite, with the originals as indicative of the band's innate ear for a melody and the covers representing Slade at their floor-shaking, foot-stamping hardest. The excellent packaging includes a picture-packed booklet, fun liner notes, and illustrations of all the original 45s and albums that you are unlikely ever to collect for yourself. And the rest of the series is just as good as this one. © Dave Thompson /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 29, 1985 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Thanks to a pair of Quiet Riot cover versions of early Slade songs, Slade was brought to the attention of a new generation of hard rock fans, who turned around and made their first album in ten years a fair-sized hit. Aiming to capitalize on their resurgence, the boys went back into the studio to record the follow-up, Rogues Gallery, even going so far as to give opening track, "Hey Ho Wish You Well," the same galloping beat and Celtic string work that made "Run Runaway" such a great comeback. Unfortunately for everyone (most notably the band), the decision was made to lay on a whole pile of keyboards this time out, perhaps trying to tap into the success Van Halen had achieved with breakthrough album 1984; the end result was an album that was far less endearing than Keep Your Hands Off My Power Supply. In fact, some of the songs are downright embarrassing, like "Walking on Water Running on Alcohol," which marries a "Be My Baby"-style big beat to Van Halen keyboards and then adds a melodramatic but ultimately sad-sack set of lyrics. Far worse is first single, "7 Year Bitch," which could have been a thoughtful look at someone who's attracted to younger women, but which kills off any chance of moral high ground with the question "...can you control the bitch?" (whether the question was asked in persona or not). Given the title of the album, perhaps such sentiments shouldn't be all that surprising, but it has to be said that the rogues' gallery concept probably would have been a lot more convincing if the music had been stripped of the keyboards and overly slick production and given more of a rock & roll edge. That edge doesn't really emerge until the track "Lock Up Your Daughters," tellingly a track that the band pulled out of the vaults. © Sean Carruthers /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 21, 1977 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

By 1977, the world had passed Slade by. At that point, they had been concentrating exclusively on cracking the U.S.A. for several years, without much success, and punk rock happened in Great Britain and literally blew hitmakers like Slade off the map. Whatever Happened to Slade? had the misfortune of following what was easily the band's worst album at that point, Nobody's Fools, which did squat in England and not much more in the U.S.A. The record was released only on band manager Chas Chandler's Barn Records, since no one else would touch it in the U.S. or Europe. Whatever Happened to Slade? is the band's extremely loud reply to the news that they were has-beens. Whereas Slade had been a huge influence on Kiss, the favor was now returned, as Whatever has a bit of the Hotter Than Hell, early-Kiss sound, which the band has acknowledged. It's still pure Slade, though. The songs and playing here are pretty much out of sight, with monster riffs and a different production style. Starting off with "Be," a tune unlike any other the band had done, Slade sets the tone. It's going to be a loud, raucous affair. "Be" reads and rhymes like a rap song, although it is sung over a funky rock beat. "Lightning Never Strikes Twice" shows bass player Jim Lea's emergence as a musician's musician. He always was a great player and the core of the band, both live and in the studio, but here Lea really gets a chance to shine. The song ends with probably the closest approximation of what it feels like to be on nitrous oxide. One of the singles from the album, "One Eyed Jacks with Moustaches," sounds like classic Slade, but once again, radio wouldn't touch it. Such is hipness in the music industry. The band was having Top Ten singles just a couple of years earlier, but no one wanted to know that. Slade was about humor and good cheer, two things British punk, for the most part, was not about. So they were marginalized. For the Slade fan, this is a great record, and one you probably never heard. Rectify that. © Geoff Ginsberg /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 27, 1978 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Pop - Released December 11, 1982 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Rock - Released November 18, 1985 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Pop - Released March 13, 1981 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

We'll Bring the House Down marks the beginning of a four-album resurgence for Slade. Released on the heels of their most triumphant moment as a band, the 1980 Reading Festival (see Slade Alive at Reading '80 EP for more on that), Slade made a powerful statement with We'll Bring the House Down: "We're back." What the band did was to take the best five songs from the previous platter, Return to Base (no one had heard that album anyway, they correctly figured), and mix them in with great new material for a killer album that wouldn't take forever to make. Simple logic will tell you that when you get rid of the worst songs and replace them with great songs, the album's gonna be a lot better. Such is the case here. The title track is automatic. One listen and you'll be chanting along, just as Slade audiences did ever since the band started playing the song. An absolute must-hear. Also, "Dizzy Mama" (riff-wise a ZZ Top "Tush" soundalike) was the Reading show-opener, and it grabbed that crowd by the throat even thought the audience had never heard it. And "When I'm Dancin' I Ain't Fightin" is pure classic Slade. This is just the type of song that made people go crazy over this band in the first place, and it stacks up to their chart-topping singles. This was the beginning of a slow build back up the British charts. We'll Bring the House Down didn't go too far, but it set the stage. Slade was back, making records people wanted to hear. The long cold winter was over. © Geoff Ginsberg /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 13, 1981 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Till Deaf Do Us Part is Slade's hardest-rocking album ever. Their playing is at its fiercest and the material totally kicks ass. While this was not quite the commercial success the band was hoping for, it didn't kill their momentum by any means. They were now packing halls again instead of playing to half-empty small clubs. The disc includes three songs that would be played live at every gig the band did from this LP's release until they stopped playing out. The opener, "Rock and Roll Preacher," features Noddy Holder praying at the altar of rock & roll. This number is so blistering, one wonders just how heavy these guys can get. Answer: very. "Lock Up Your Daughters" is as catchy as it gets and maintains the furious instrumental pace of the record. "Daughters" is a perfect example of how far the band had come. It retains the almost bubblegum sound of the earlier singles, while the heavy production style gives it a bit more of a hard-rocking edge. The wonderfully Slade-esque "Ruby Red," which failed as a single, makes a good album track, and "A Night to Remember" is definitely a song to remember, as it ups the intensity ante. Also included is the hysterical "That Was No Lady That Was My Wife" and a rare song written by Dave Hill, an innocuous little instrumental called "M'Hat, M'Coat." This is noteworthy, since from the earliest days of the band all the originals were by Jim Lea and Holder. This LP shows a band with renewed enthusiasm and confidence. And by the way, the original album cover (drawing of an ear with a bent nail in it) is way cooler than the CD cover (band shot in flames). Recommended for rockers. © Geoff Ginsberg /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 27, 1987 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Slade gets the shaft. Maybe because of jealousy (like Hugh Hefner) or who knows why, these British boyz are nuked by the mainstream, metalheads, critics, and America. Well, I'm proclaiming my allegiance and membership as a Slademanian because slabs by Slade constantly deliver the goods. In 1987, the quartet still gives great noize 20-odd years after forming as the 'N Betweens. Every track here stomps out a variation on the Slade theme of "Sing Shout (Knock Yourself Out)." Take raging opener "Love Is Like a Rock," which didn't fair any better commercially for the boyz than the tune did for awesome originators Donnie Iris and the Cruisers; this class cut remains an ace way to kick off the album because "Love" is, like, so Slade in the first place (they should have spelled the title wrong on the sleeve). Slade's headiest daze long gone, the band amazingly squeezes out sparks like "Still the Same" (not Bob Segar's pap, Slade wrote the rest of the record.): always tunefully tight, but loose enough to sing in the pub. "Fools Go Crazy" evokes some longing but still burns. And Slade's never afraid to ask you to rock along (just don't break Noddy's heart). "Ooh La La in L.A." is, naturally, another anthemic and trashy barnstormer. "Roaring Silence" swipes its opening from Simple Minds, but who cares. Face facts, AC/DC stole Slade's shtick all those years ago and now can't write its way out of a six pack, while these crazee boyz are still having fun slinging crisp chops and heavy hooks. Kudos. That's what Slade is for. © Doug Stone /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 1, 1979 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Return to Base marks Slade's low ebb in terms of popularity and morale. The band's future prospects looked grim, at best, and this album did nothing to change that. Having said that, Return To Base is not half bad. It contains about five classic Slade numbers, and several throwaways. Still on Barn Records, where the band had floundered over the preceding couple of years, Return to Base attracted so little attention the band could've played naked in the middle of Piccadilly Circus and not been noticed. Nevertheless, songs like the opener, "Wheels Ain't Coming Down," and "Nuts Bolts and Screws," stand up with the band's best work, and that is saying a lot. Both songs are infectious to the degree that humming them could become a chronic problem. Similarly, the version of Chuck Berry's "I'm a Rocker" is catchy as all get out. The sound of this record harkens back to the hit single sound, a bit less overdriven and heavy, and a bit more hook-filled and light. Acoustic guitars even appear at times. Sure there are some subpar tunes on here, but the bonus tracks help make up for that. In particular, "Two Track Stereo, One Track Mind" (originally a B-side of the "My Oh My" 12" single) is unquestionably one of those Slade songs that just rocks like there's no tomorrow. Certainly not a high point for the band, but they kept on keepin' on, no matter how bad things got. Secure in the knowledge that practically no one had ever heard the thing, Slade eventually redid the record as We'll Bring the House Down, a fully realized project. © Geoff Ginsberg /TiVo

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