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Alternative & Indie - Released January 18, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Sharon Van Etten waited five years before releasing a follow up to Are We There, her 2014 album on which she brilliantly juggled between the legacies of Cat Power, Nick Cave, John Cale, Joan As Police Woman, St Vincent, Feist and Fiona Apple. It’s a record on which she was, above all, herself. She confirms this with Remind Me Tomorrow which was conceived when her schedule was overflowing between a role in the series The OA, the writing of the soundtrack for Katherine Dieckmann’s film Strange Weather, the music for comedian Tig Notaro’s show, preparing for a psychology degree, an appearance in the series Twin Peaks and the birth of her first child!Energy is at the heart of this 2019 vintage record on which John Congleton handled the the arrangements. The producer is without a doubt at the forefront of the more rhythmic sequences rather than the more accustomed ones, such as the single Comeback Kid. With less minimalist reflections and more assertive affirmations, Sharon Van Etten hasn’t lost her uniqueness along the way. And what she has added here doesn’t alter the original taste too much. Congleton knew how to find the perfect sound texture to make the singer’s gothic folk universe all the more powerful and charming. With this album one of the most talented artists of her generation continues to grow. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 16, 2021 | Ba Da Bing!

Sharon Van Etten celebrated the tenth anniversary of her second album Epic by reissuing the record as Epic Ten. The difference between the two albums? Epic Ten contains the original album plus covers of its seven songs performed by a variety of different artists. The marquee names are Fiona Apple, Courtney Barnett, and Lucinda Williams, with IDLES, Shamir, Big Red Machine and St. Panther rounding out the lineup. From the moment this new take on Epic opens with Big Red Machine plowing through "A Crime," it's clear that this version is bigger, louder, and more immediate than Van Etten's, yet there's still a sense of intimacy in the performances. It's there in Apple's full-throated "Love More," Barnett's wry delivery on "Don't Do It," and the bittersweet closing "One Day" by St. Panther. Offering a newly recorded version of Epic by a bunch of different artists turns out to not only be a clever idea, but it also shows how versatile and strong Van Etten's writing is. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 27, 2014 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 7, 2012 | Jagjaguwar

Booklet
When Sharon Van Etten issued the ironically titled seven-song Epic in 2009, it stood in stark contrast to her 2007 debut, Because I Was in Love. On the latter record, she employed a full-on rock band, her songwriting gained a more defined precision, and her singing voice -- even at its most vulnerable -- seemed to speak with a confidence that didn't seem to need any frame of reference other than its own. Tramp is titled for the period of post-relationship uncertainty and the period of homelessness Van Etten experienced during its 14-month recording process. Produced by the National's Aaron Dessner, who puts the songwriter's fine singing voice front and center, it features guest appearances by Zach Condon, Julianna Barwick, and more. "Warsaw," with its jagged electric guitars, bass, halting keyboards, and primitive, tom-tom heavy drums, is a shambling illustration of what's to be found here. Van Etten's protagonist is still vulnerable, but she wills herself toward a horizon past it. Likewise, the set's first single "Serpents," with its rumbling guitars and cracking snares, frankly discusses being physically and emotionally abused, but it comes from the other side, her protagonist is out of the situation, refusing to be a victim. Jenn Wassner's backing vocals in every line transform this into an anthem of survival. Not everything here falls down the rock & roll rabbit hole, however. Acoustically driven ballads such as "Kevin's," "All I Can," and "Leonard" highlight her subject's character defects and vulnerabilities as well as those of her significant other's. Van Etten's lyrics accuse as much as they confess and empathize. More often than not, her subject is the one who leaves, rather than the one left; the reasons are myriad: betrayal, co-dependency, a willingness toward an emotional freedom that allows love itself to dictate what it expects. There is great beauty on Tramp, especially in its last third; from the jaunty, acoustic stroll of "We Are Fine" to the multi-textured, nearly psych-pop of "I'm Wrong," to the airy, drifting closer "Joke or a Lie." For all this, Van Etten skirts the edges of giving us a great album without actually delivering one. Perhaps it's the exhaustive, confessional nature of its songs, its reliance on three basic melodic ideas, or even its length. Whatever the reason(s), Tramp doesn't quite fulfill its considerable promise. But this isn't a criticism; Van Etten is still a young, developing songwriter who gets more sophisticated with each album. As such, Tramp offers plenty for listeners to enjoy as she goes. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 20, 2021 | Jagjaguwar

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Get out the cinemascope, hit the lights and roll out the red carpet: Sharon Van Etten and Angel Olsen will take care of the rest. For this magical pop song, gilded and shining like a diamond, these two American queens of the indie scene, with a (more or less) folk vibe, join forces and pool their lyrical talents. With perfect production from the unmissable John Congleton, Like I Used To is one of those timeless vintage singles that owes as much to sugary sixties girl-group pop as to the silky ballads of the Nashville Sound, or even slightly lounge-inflected pop songs. This duo-for-a-day, eloquent but never overbearing, offer up guitars and piano woven into a fine filigree of the sort that Richard Hawley might have made. Champagne! © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 21, 2010 | Ba Da Bing!

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 13, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 27, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 26, 2009 | language of stone - sve productions

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 9, 2015 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 12, 2021 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 20, 2013 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 10, 2021 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 13, 2012 | Jagjaguwar

Booklet
When Sharon Van Etten issued the ironically titled seven-song Epic in 2009, it stood in stark contrast to her 2007 debut, Because I Was in Love. On the latter record, she employed a full-on rock band, her songwriting gained a more defined precision, and her singing voice -- even at its most vulnerable -- seemed to speak with a confidence that didn't seem to need any frame of reference other than its own. Tramp is titled for the period of post-relationship uncertainty and the period of homelessness Van Etten experienced during its 14-month recording process. Produced by the National's Aaron Dessner, who puts the songwriter's fine singing voice front and center, it features guest appearances by Zach Condon, Julianna Barwick, and more. "Warsaw," with its jagged electric guitars, bass, halting keyboards, and primitive, tom-tom heavy drums, is a shambling illustration of what's to be found here. Van Etten's protagonist is still vulnerable, but she wills herself toward a horizon past it. Likewise, the set's first single "Serpents," with its rumbling guitars and cracking snares, frankly discusses being physically and emotionally abused, but it comes from the other side, her protagonist is out of the situation, refusing to be a victim. Jenn Wassner's backing vocals in every line transform this into an anthem of survival. Not everything here falls down the rock & roll rabbit hole, however. Acoustically driven ballads such as "Kevin's," "All I Can," and "Leonard" highlight her subject's character defects and vulnerabilities as well as those of her significant other's. Van Etten's lyrics accuse as much as they confess and empathize. More often than not, her subject is the one who leaves, rather than the one left; the reasons are myriad: betrayal, co-dependency, a willingness toward an emotional freedom that allows love itself to dictate what it expects. There is great beauty on Tramp, especially in its last third; from the jaunty, acoustic stroll of "We Are Fine" to the multi-textured, nearly psych-pop of "I'm Wrong," to the airy, drifting closer "Joke or a Lie." For all this, Van Etten skirts the edges of giving us a great album without actually delivering one. Perhaps it's the exhaustive, confessional nature of its songs, its reliance on three basic melodic ideas, or even its length. Whatever the reason(s), Tramp doesn't quite fulfill its considerable promise. But this isn't a criticism; Van Etten is still a young, developing songwriter who gets more sophisticated with each album. As such, Tramp offers plenty for listeners to enjoy as she goes. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released March 3, 2017 | 30th Century Records - Columbia

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 20, 2009 | Language Of Stone

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 14, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 18, 2021 | Ba Da Bing!

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 5, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 4, 2021 | Ba Da Bing!

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Sharon Van Etten in the magazine