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Rock - Released November 24, 2017 | RCA Local

Born to Touch Your Feelings: Best of Rock Ballads collects classic Scorpions tracks with brand new compositions, capturing the German rock band's ballads. The anthology includes two brand new songs, "Melrose Avenue" and "Always Be with You," and a re-recorded version of "Follow Your Heart." The record also includes classic favorites like their 1991 hit "Winds of Change." © Bekki Bemrose /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 27, 1984 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

Although the Scorpions had already achieved fame after 1982's Blackout, Love at First Sting brought them their biggest single of the decade, the slick anthem "Rock You Like a Hurricane," with some greatly underrated songs to back it up. The album opens with the hair-raising "Bad Boys Running Wild" and continues with songs such as the memorable "Big City Nights" and the half-ballad, half-powerhouse rocker "Coming Home." The record also contains what just may be the band's best ballad ever, the tear-jerking "Still Loving You." Considering the fact that it has some of their best-ever singles, Love at First Sting is definitely a must for all fans of the Scorpions. © Barry Weber /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1990 | Island Mercury

After the release of Savage Amusement in 1988, the Scorpions expressed disdain toward the album, feeling that it was too polished when compared to their other work. Their longtime producer, Dieter Dierks, was replaced with well-known rock producer Keith Olsen, who would produce Crazy World and assist in making it one of the Scorpions' greatest recordings. Their music had certainly changed since Savage Amusement, sounding a little bit heavier and less glamorous. But even with the metal sound, the songs remain melodic and catchy. The power ballads on the album, "Wind of Change" and "Send Me an Angel," are arguably two of the band's greatest slow numbers, boasting soothing harmony and lyrics. Crazy World remains the Scorpions' finest '90s album and is sure to please its listeners. © Barry Weber /TiVo
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Hard Rock - Released March 22, 2001 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released November 29, 2013 | RCA Deutschland

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Rock - Released January 15, 1979 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

Prior to Lovedrive's recording, the Scorpions' lineup had a major change when their lead guitarist, Uli Jon Roth, quit the group (not to mention, the rock genre was rapidly changing). With this in mind, the band not only highlighted the album with the licks and riffs of three guitarists (Rudolf Schenker, Michael Schenker, Matthias Jabs), but they also dramatically changed their style to sound more like that of Van Halen. This change is quite welcome; not only are the performances more unpredictable, but the lyrics and melodies are better written. In fact, some of the Scorpions' best songs, such as "Loving You Sunday Morning," "Holiday," and "Coast to Coast" are found here, making it one of their finest. © Barry Weber /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 29, 1982 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

Blackout was Scorpions' first highly successful album, due to its clever balance of pop/rock (the title track), power ballads ("When the Smoke Is Going Down"), and catchy heavy metal ("Dynamite," "No One Like You"). Vocalist Klaus Meine had a throat operation prior to the record's release, and surprisingly, his voice sounds more melodic and lively than ever. The rest of the band sounds great as well, and the album is highlighted by the fast-paced performances of guitarists Rudolf Schenker and Matthias Jabs. Blackout has been called Scorpions' best record ever, and that statement is not unjust. "No One Like You" gave the band its first chart hit. © Barry Weber /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 1, 1978 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

If you played in a hard rock band during the '70s, what were you likely to be doing circa 1978? Why, recording a live album, of course. Preferably a double vinyl set, and in Japan to boot. The Scorpions were no exception, and in fact, their Tokyo Tapes were captured only days after Cheap Trick's At Budokan in April 1978. Though hardly as inspired or successful, the Tokyo Tapes set still serves as an ideal greatest-hits collection of the Scorpions' first decade. This recording also showcases the spectacular playing (and occasionally, the dreadful singing) of guitarist Uli Jon Roth, who would soon leave the band for a misguided solo career, but displays some jaw-dropping technique here, most notably on the epic "We'll Burn the Sky." The rest of the band also puts in competent performances on such early standards as "In Trance," "Fly to the Rainbow," and "Speedy's Coming." The material on disc one is consistently strong, and though a number of pointless covers ("Houng Dog," "Long Tall Sally") and that most dreaded concert spectacle -- the drum solo -- break the flow on disc two, the band still closes strong with the crowd-pleasing Japanese folk song "Kojo No Tsuki" and frenetic versions of "Dark Lady" and "Robot Man." Ultimately, if you have any curiosity about the Scorpions' early material, Tokyo Tapes provides the perfect introduction. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 20, 1985 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

This live album, originally released as a double-record set, succeeds in capturing the raw power and high energy that the group can actually attain in performance. Although a few songs were lost in the move from record to compact disc, the band's greatest hits are retained from their '84-'85 tour, from ballads such as "Holiday" to rock anthems like "Blackout." The album is never tedious, and all of the fourteen songs on the recording are captured with excellent authenticity. World Wide Live is by far the Scorpions' best live release, and is a must for fans of their music. © Barry Weber /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released January 24, 1990 | RCA Victor

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Hard Rock - Released November 4, 2011 | Legacy Recordings

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Rock - Released December 4, 1977 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

Less brutal than the two previous albums, this one is nonetheless an underappreciated treat. Sure, there are some weak cuts, but there are plenty of strong ones to make up for it. Among the highlights of the disc are the energetic anthem "Steamrock Fever" and the growling song of androgyny "He's a Woman, She's a Man." The highlight of the disc, though, is "We'll Burn the Sky." This one is lyrically quite similar to the Blue Oyster Cult classic "Don't Fear the Reaper," but the music is a wonderfully building anthemic ballad. It is arguably one of the finest songs the Scorpions have ever done. © Gary Hill /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released March 22, 2010 | Columbia SevenOne

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Rock - Released March 31, 1980 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

Although Animal Magnetism contains such classic songs as "The Zoo" and "Make It Real," the album is somewhat disappointing when compared to its predecessor, Lovedrive. The well-written songs on this album end up saving it from total disaster, and it's obvious the band wasn't sure what to exactly put on this record -- many of the songs sound like the work of some other rock group and simply don't blend together as they should. Singer Klaus Meine, known for his excellent vocal performances, sounds bored and just plain overshadowed. Although far from bad, Animal Magnetism isn't a highlight of the Scorpions' career. © Barry Weber /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 15, 1988 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

The Scorpions' two previous releases, Blackout and Love at First Sting, were mostly successful due to the band's ability to adjust with the times; with Blackout, they used the classic power rock introduced by bands like Van Halen, and for Sting they used similar melodies, but with a harder, tighter sound akin to the work of such bands as Dokken and REO Speedwagon. With Savage Amusement, the group's first studio recording in almost four years, the Scorpions experimented with more polished pop melodies that Def Leppard and the like had made popular. The end result is polished and often predictable music that, while good, on the whole fails to be as infectious as the music on their previous albums. Die-hard fans will certainly find their share of worthwhile songs, such as "Don't Stop at the Top" and "Believe in Love," but they still may find Savage Amusement to be incomparable to its predecessors. © Barry Weber /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 11, 2014 | RCA Deutschland

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Pop/Rock - Released August 24, 2012 | Columbia SevenOne

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Rock - Released November 13, 2015 | SevenOne Music

Pop/Rock - Released February 15, 2010 | Sony BMG Music Entertainment

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Hard Rock - Released April 1, 1975 | RCA Records Label

On their second effort, Fly to the Rainbow, the Scorpions begin to establish their trademark hard-rock sound while exorcising the last of their remaining psychedelic hippie tendencies. In fact, the band bursts out of the gate in surprisingly straightforward fashion with the hard rocking "Speedy's Coming" before resorting to the aforementioned bad habits on otherwise promising tracks such as "Fly People Fly" and "They Need a Million"; the first never really gets off the ground, seeming almost like a prelude to the title track, and the second is let down by the weak vocals of guitarists Rudolf Schenker and Uli Jon Roth, who have no business competing against vocalist Klaus Meine. Roth insists, however, on taking center stage for "Drifting Sun," which exposes his shameless Hendrix-isms, down to the opening riff lifted straight out of "Spanish Castle Magic." And while it closes the album in rather schizophrenic fashion, the epic nine-minute title track would become a concert standard -- albeit without its senseless folky intro. Fly to the Rainbow is another growing experience for the Scorpions; and the band would truly hit the jackpot with the following year's In Trance. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo