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Rock - Released March 23, 1973 | EG Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Stereophile: Record To Die For
On Roxy Music's debut, the tensions between Brian Eno and Bryan Ferry propelled their music to great, unexpected heights, and for most of the group's second album, For Your Pleasure, the band equals, if not surpasses, those expectations. However, there are a handful of moments where those tensions become unbearable, as when Eno wants to move toward texture and Ferry wants to stay in more conventional rock territory; the nine-minute "The Bogus Man" captures such creative tensions perfectly, and it's easy to see why Eno left the group after the album was completed. Still, those differences result in yet another extraordinary record from Roxy Music, one that demonstrates even more clearly than the debut how avant-garde ideas can flourish in a pop setting. This is especially evident in the driving singles "Do the Strand" and "Editions of You," which pulsate with raw energy and jarring melodic structures. Roxy also illuminate the slower numbers, such as the eerie "In Every Dream Home a Heartache," with atonal, shimmering synthesizers, textures that were unexpected and innovative at the time of its release. Similarly, all of For Your Pleasure walks the tightrope between the experimental and the accessible, creating a new vocabulary for rock bands, and one that was exploited heavily in the ensuing decade. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1999 | EG Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Flesh + Blood suggested that Roxy Music were at the end of the line, but they regrouped and recorded the lovely Avalon, one of their finest albums. Certainly, the lush, elegant soundscapes of Avalon are far removed from the edgy avant-pop of their early records, yet it represents another landmark in their career. With its stylish, romantic washes of synthesizers and Bryan Ferry's elegant, seductive croon, Avalon simultaneously functioned as sophisticated make-out music for yuppies and as the maturation of synth pop. Ferry was never this romantic or seductive, either with Roxy or as a solo artist, and Avalon shimmers with elegance in both its music and its lyrics. "More Than This," "Take a Chance with Me," "While My Heart Is Still Beating," and the title track are immaculately crafted and subtle songs, where the shifting synthesizers and murmured vocals gradually reveal the melodies. It's a rich, textured album and a graceful way to end the band's career. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 24, 1975 | EG Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Abandoning the intoxicating blend of art rock and glam-pop that distinguished Stranded and Country Life, Roxy Music concentrate on Bryan Ferry's suave, charming crooner persona for the elegantly modern Siren. As the disco-fied opener "Love Is the Drug" makes clear, Roxy embrace dance and unabashed pop on Siren, weaving them into their sleek, arty sound. It does come at the expense of their artier inclinations, which is part of what distinguished Roxy, but the end result is captivating. Lacking the consistently amazing songs of its predecessor, Siren has a thematic consistency that works in its favor, and helps elevate its best songs -- "Sentimental Fool," "Both Ends Burning," "Just Another High" -- as well as the album itself into the realm of classics. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 15, 1974 | EG Records

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
Continuing with the stylistic developments of Stranded, Country Life finds Roxy Music at the peak of their powers, alternating between majestic, unsettling art rock and glamorous, elegant pop/rock. At their best, Roxy combine these two extremes, like on the exhilarating opener "The Thrill of It All," but Country Life benefits considerably from the ebb and flow of the group's two extremes, since it showcases their deft instrumental execution and their textured, enthralling songwriting. And, in many ways, Country Life offers the greatest and most consistent set of Roxy Music songs, illustrating their startling depth. From the sleek rock of "All I Want Is You" and "Prairie Rose" to the elegant, string-laced pop of "A Really Good Time," Country Life is filled with thrilling songs, and Roxy Music rarely sounded as invigorating as they do here. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 16, 1972 | Virgin Records

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
At the turn of the 70s, David Bowie was not the only one to take rock and pop music into the backrooms of glam excesses. With Roxy Music, the genre even moves in an unexpected—and most of all even wackier—direction, probably because of the atypical cast of the British formation led by Bryan Ferry, a kind of neo dandy and a true crooner. At the outset, Roxy gathers a flock of freaks eager to experiment with all genres and go full-speed into avant-garde. In 1972, the band’s first eponymous album, as classy as it is slutty, is completely unclassifiable. Brian Eno pushes all the keys of his synthesizers. Andy Mackay plays the sax like a madman. And Phil Manzanera abuses his guitars like a serial killer in the middle of a dismemberment workshop! To celebrate the 45th birthday of the landing of this UFO on our planet, the required remastering of the original disc is coupled with a rather tasty BBC Session. Those are perfect suits of light to rediscover this grating session of rock ‘n’ roll bribery. But the best is yet to come as with the following album, For Your Pleasure, Roxy Music will take on an even more impressive dimension… © MZ/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 2001 | EG Records

Released to herald a reunion of the band and superseding several out-of-print predecessors, The Best of Roxy Music is an excellent summary of the group's hits and album highlights between 1972 and 1982. There are really two editions of Roxy Music, the glam rock unit that achieved widespread U.K. success from 1972 to 1975, and the more polished one that was a broader international success from 1979 to 1982. The compilers have dealt with the dichotomy and the more lasting popularity of the later recordings by presenting the compilation in reverse chronological order, so that soft rock hits like "Over You" and "Dance Away," which scored in America, come before U.K.-only hits like "Street Life" and "Virginia Plain," which rock much harder. But all the major hits are here (only a couple of less-successful British singles chart entries are missing), augmented by memorable album tracks like "Do the Strand" and "Mother of Pearl." In print or not, this is the best single-disc collection of Roxy Music, since it is more complete than earlier compilations like the 1977 Greatest Hits and 1983 The Atlantic Years (1973-1980) LPs, and, unlike later best-ofs such as Street Life: 20 Great Hits (1986), The Ultimate Collection (1988), and More Than This: The Best of Bryan Ferry and Roxy Music (1995) (the latter two U.K. releases), it is not divided between Bryan Ferry solo tracks and Roxy Music ones. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 23, 1980 | Virgin Records Ltd

An even slicker record than Manifesto, Flesh + Blood precariously balances between alluringly seductive, sophisticated soul-pop and cloying, radio-ready disco-pop. At its best, the album is effortlessly suave and charming -- "Over You" is one of their greatest singles, and "Oh Yeah" is nearly as persuasive -- but much of the record is devoted to ill-formed, stylish lounge-pop. In particular, the reliance on reworked covers of "In the Midnight Hour" and "Eight Miles High" is distressing, not only because it signals a lack of imagination, but also because it suggests that Flesh + Blood is simply a lesser solo effort from Bryan Ferry. And even the handful of undeniably strong moments can't erase the feeling that Roxy Music were beginning to run out of ideas. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 16, 1972 | EG Records

Falling halfway between musical primitivism and art rock ambition, Roxy Music's eponymous debut remains a startling redefinition of rock's boundaries. Simultaneously embracing kitschy glamour and avant-pop, Roxy Music shimmers with seductive style and pulsates with disturbing synthetic textures. Although no musician demonstrates much technical skill at this point, they are driven by boundless imagination -- Brian Eno's synthesized "treatments" exploit electronic instruments as electronics, instead of trying to shoehorn them into conventional acoustic patterns. Similarly, Bryan Ferry finds that his vampiric croon is at its most effective when it twists conventional melodies, Phil Manzanera's guitar is terse and unpredictable, while Andy Mackay's saxophone subverts rock & roll clichés by alternating R&B honking with atonal flourishes. But what makes Roxy Music such a confident, astonishing debut is how these primitive avant-garde tendencies are married to full-fledged songs, whether it's the free-form, structure-bending "Re-Make/Re-Model" or the sleek glam of "Virginia Plain," the debut single added to later editions of the album. That was the trick that elevated Roxy Music from an art school project to the most adventurous rock band of the early '70s. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 1, 1973 | EG Records

Without Brian Eno, Roxy Music immediately became less experimental, yet they remained adventurous, as Stranded illustrates. Under the direction of Bryan Ferry, Roxy moved toward relatively straightforward territory, adding greater layers of piano and heavy guitars. Even without the washes of Eno's synthesizers, Roxy's music remains unsettling on occasion, yet in this new incarnation, they favor more measured material, whether it's the reflective "A Song for Europe" or the shifting textures of "Psalm." Even the rockers, such as the surging "Street Life" and the segmented "Mother of Pearl," are distinguished by subtle songwriting that emphasizes both Ferry's tortured glamour and Roxy's increasingly impressive grasp of sonic detail. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 16, 1979 | EG Records

Returning to action after four years of solo projects, Roxy Music redefined its sound and agenda on Manifesto. More than ever, Roxy sounds like Bryan Ferry's backing band, as the group strips away its art rock influences, edits out the instrumental interludes in favor of concise pop songs, and adds layers of stylish disco rhythms. Although the songwriting is distressingly inconsistent, there are a number of wonderful moments on the record, particularly in the sighing "Angel Eyes" and the heartbroken "Dance Away." Still, trading sonic adventure for lush, accessible disco-pop isn't entirely satisfactory, even if it is momentarily seductive. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 2, 2003 | Mercury Studios

After 18 years off, everyone knew that Roxy Music's 2001 reunion tour was going to be an event, and by all accounts, it was. But once the thrill of it all wore off, did the band still have anything to say musically? The answer is a resounding yes. Eagle Records' release of the double-CD Live features tracks recorded all over the world, creating a virtual dream concert made from the best-recorded, best-played songs of the 2001 tour. Unfettered by the need to promote an album, Roxy was free to survey their entire career, and it would be hard to come up with a better set list (OK, "Pyjamarama" should have been included). The expanded lineup enables the band to effortlessly re-create everything from Eddie Jobson's violin solos to Eno's treatments and textures, and while the arrangements stick pretty much to the original script, the band really digs into the tunes, and Phil Manzanera and Andy Mackay have never sounded better as soloists. In fact, Manzanera is consistently dazzling every time he steps to the fore, sounding every bit as ferocious and unearthly as he did on their first few albums. Having Paul Thompson back behind the drumkit was vital for the early material, but also adds some needed power to tunes like "My Only Love". Bryan Ferry's voice has weathered just a bit, but he's still the epitome of crooner cool. The sound quality, as expected, is excellent, allowing the listener to hear every musical detail the band offers. Audience participation, the bane of many a live album, is largely held in check until the very end of the set when it intrudes slightly on the encore numbers. But this is a very small quibble about a thoroughly wonderful release. This set should impress those unfamiliar with Roxy and will surely thrill longtime fans. It's a fine testament to this band that these songs sound timeless rather than dated nearly 30 years down the line in many cases. After nearly two decades away, Roxy Music prove that they still have plenty of style and plenty of substance. Recommended. © Sean Westergaard /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 20, 1995 | EG Records

Album-rock artists like Roxy Music always make a difficult subject for comprehensive, multi-disc box sets. Frequently, their albums were designed as a cohesive whole and the idea of individual singles never really entered the picture at all. Roxy Music was slightly different than the average art/prog-rock band -- not only did they make albums, they also made singles. And that is one of the reasons why the four-disc set The Thrill of It All is successful. Roxy's songs stand as individual works, and they make sense outside of their original context, even if they make more sense within their original context. Thankfully, the majority of each of their major albums are reproduced on the first three discs of this collection, leaving the fourth disc for non-LP singles, remixes, and B-sides. Most of this material has not been available on CD before, making The Thrill of it All essential for collectors. Nevertheless, it's a helpful guide to Roxy's career for casual fans -- it contains all of the essential songs and shows why the group was one of the seminal bands of the '70s. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 1, 1976 | EG Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1999 | EG Records

Recorded live in France in 1982 but not released on CD in the U.S. until 1990, Heart Still Beating isn't quite in a class with Roxy Music's first live album, Viva, but nonetheless gives us a lot to be excited about. Lead singer Bryan Ferry and guitarist Phil Manzanera sound quite inspired much of the time, and Manzanera delivers some excellent solos. Longtime Roxy devotees will want to savor engaging versions of "Out of the Blue" and "Both Ends Burning" (both of which were heard on Viva), as well as such favorites as "Dance Away," "Avalon" and the clever "Love Is the Drug." Roxy comes closer to a mainstream rock sound on enjoyable interpretations of Neil Young's "Like a Hurricane" and John Lennon's "Jealous Guy," but even then, the distinctive band's quirky art-rock tendencies remain. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2004 | EMI Gold

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Rock - Released January 1, 2000 | Virgin Records

Because of its distinct stylistic transformations, Roxy Music's output has never been compiled all that well (save for The Thrill of It All, since its four discs could paint a more expansive picture of the band's evolution). One alternate tactic for a single-disc compilation is to capture just one of the group's phases, and that's what The Early Years tries to do -- specifically, the group's most experimental, electronic-oriented period. Brian Eno was a member of the band on 12 of the 16 tracks here, the others being taken from the third Roxy album Stranded; all told, there are six songs from Roxy Music and five from For Your Pleasure, plus the non-LP U.K. hit single "Pyjamarama". Although there's a noticeable difference when Eno leaves, the Stranded material still fits the overall approach pretty well; moreover, it's hard to quibble too much with the track selection. Since each of the albums it draws from is a very strong listen in its own right (For Your Pleasure in particular is a classic), The Early Years can't be called a completely definitive look at the artiest period of Roxy's career, but it is an excellent snapshot, as well as a good introduction for casual fans who don't want to buy all the original albums. [Originally released in 1989, The Early Years was remastered and reissued by Caroline in 2000.] © Steve Huey /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Virgin

In the nomenclature of music compilations, the word "essential" (as opposed to "best of" or "greatest hits") has come to connote an album in which some degree of editorial judgment has been exercised, such that key album tracks may be substituted for hit singles here and there in the name of presenting an artist's strengths and not just the most popular recordings. So it is with this selection of the "essential" works of Roxy Music (a band that has had its share of best-ofs and greatest-hits albums), as represented by a 16-track, 67-and-a-half-minute disc. The group's ten-year existence may be divided into its early years (1972-1976) and its later ones (1979-1982), with the first part containing somewhat more experimental and harder rocking music, and the second part featuring smoother-sounding dance-pop. The compiler here seems to prefer the first half, such that an LP track like the six-and-a-half-minute "If There Is Something," for example, trumps later U.K. Top Five singles such as "Over You" and "More Than This," which are missing. Roxy Music's sole British chart-topper, a cover of John Lennon's "Jealous Guy," meanwhile, is represented by a live recording. Most of the band's big hits are featured, but the album is best recommended to the neophyte who wants to get an overall sense of what Roxy Music were all about, not a fan who wants the group's most popular tracks on a single CD. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo

Rock - Released June 30, 2020 | Renaissance Records USA

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Rock - Released March 4, 2020 | FNM

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Rock - Released October 22, 2020 | Turnstile