Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES€26.99
CD€19.49

Rock - Released March 6, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res
From
CD€41.99

Rock - Released October 20, 2014 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

From
CD€14.99

Rock - Released March 1, 2003 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Although best known for his barnstorming blues-rock, Irish guitarist Rory Gallagher had a softer side, too. All of his studio albums contain at least one acoustic folk-blues track, and Gallagher included an unplugged set in the majority of his live shows way before that was fashionable. Almost eight years after his death, Rory's brother Donal compiled a 14-track collection of previously unreleased work dedicated to Gallagher's folkier approach. It's the second such posthumous album (the terrific live and very electric BBC Sessions came out in 1999), and focuses on an important if lesser recognized aspect of the guitarist's career. It's also an eclectic set that shifts from melodic ballads ("Wheels Within Wheels") to instrumental modified flamenco ("Flight to Paradise" with classical guitarist Juan Martin) and solo Delta blues (a studio take of Tony Joe White's "As the Crow Flies," the live version of which was a highlight of Irish Tour). And that's just the first three songs. Unreleased gems such as "Lonesome Highway" sound like classic Gallagher (this even features a plugged-in solo), but the disc is most successful when it unearths rare collaborations with Martin Carthy, Bert Jansch, and Scottish skiffle legend Lonnie Donegan. The latter is caught live on a rousing version of "Goin' to My Hometown," one of this album's many highlights. The heavily bootlegged "The Cuckoo," also finds official release in a stirring version assisted by Roland Van Campenhout on second guitar. Three live tunes with stripped-down accompaniment from Béla Fleck on banjo and harmonica master Mark Feltham find Gallagher running through a seemingly improvised medley of "Amazing Grace," Robert Johnson's "Walking Blues," and Bill Monroe's "Blue Moon of Kentucky," showing just how diverse Gallagher's tastes were. Established Gallagher fans will love this for the unusually laid-back setting, but Wheels Within Wheels might also attract a hardcore folk audience likely unaware of the rock guitarist's affinity for this genre. The varying sound quality is a little sketchy, especially on the concert tracks, but the sheer enthusiasm and joy infused in these grooves override any audio shortcomings. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
From
CD€17.99

Rock - Released May 17, 2011 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

It's surprising, considering the interesting back story on the studio portion of this posthumous Rory Gallagher release, that there are no notes on the actual packaging to chronicle its eventual appearance in 2011, nearly 33 years after being recorded in December 1977. According to the press release though, Gallagher clashed with producer Elliot Mazer about the mix on these dozen tunes and not only shelved the tapes, but broke up his longtime band after the San Francisco session ended. Out went keyboardist Lou Martin and drummer Rod de'Ath, replaced by skinsman Ted McKenna (bassist Gerry McAvoy remained) to strip down the sound for his next phase. About half these songs, such as "Mississippi Sheiks," "Fuel to the Fire," "Brute Force & Ignorance," "Cruise on Out," and "Overnight Bag" appeared on 1978's Photo Finish in different performances. Some, like the closing "Out on the Tiles" and "B Girl," will be new to all but the most ardent Gallagher followers. Shortly before his death, the guitarist apparently mentioned to his brother Donald that he'd like the tapes to be released someday if they were remixed, which is exactly what Donald's son Daniel did in 2011, resulting in these long-lost tracks finally seeing the light of day. Despite Gallagher's reservations, everything here is up to his usual high standard, and he obviously respected the material enough to re-record the bulk of it with a different band and producer later that year. The electric violin on "Mississippi Sheiks" is a new twist on both Gallagher's blues-rock style and the song, which helps differentiate this version from the more famous one that appeared on Photo Finish. Saxophone, played by Martin Fiero, enhances two cuts, also bringing a unique groove, especially to the lumbering "Brute Force and Ignorance." The package includes a December 1979 live show, also recorded in San Francisco, that finds Gallagher and his two-piece in typically fine fettle. They revisit the Taste-era chestnut "Bullfrog Blues" and tear into the rarity "I'm Leavin'" with their notorious paint-peeling approach. He digs back some years for a tough take on "Tattoo'd Lady," but most of the set is derived from his mid- to late-'70s albums Top Priority, Photo Finish, and Calling Card. A breathless "Sea Cruise" closes the set, and is probably a nod to Jerry Lee Lewis, on whose album Gallagher guested. It caps off a roaring, electrifying show that, along with the studio disc, makes a worthwhile addition to any Gallagher lover's collection. Even lacking detailed liner notes, this is a keeper and an important historical document in Rory Gallagher's short but eventful career. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
From
CD€19.49

Rock - Released March 6, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Check Shirt Wizard: Live in 1977 is a 20-track collection culled from four shows from Rory Gallagher's 1977 U.K. tour. The previously unreleased live tracks were recorded in London, Sheffield, Brighton, and Newcastle and feature songs from his 1976 album Calling Card as well as tracks from 1975's Against the Grain. © TiVo