Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD€14.99

Rock - Released December 21, 2010 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Nowhere seems to hold consensus as the second-best record of the shoegaze era, and with very good reason. All of the common words, phrases, and adjectives commonly used with the short-lived subgenre fit properly here, and they're all positive, every one of them. Whir, whoosh, haze, swirl, ad nauseum -- this record holds all of these elements at their most exciting and mastered. But in the end, great pop records necessitate quality songs, which Nowhere delivers throughout. Undeniably, it's Ride's zenith -- dense, tight, hypnotic. "Seagull" serves as a dynamic opener; after a couple seconds of light feedback, bassist Steve Queralt kicks in with a rubbery, elliptical line (reminiscent of a certain Beatles song), which is soon followed by Andy Bell and Mark Gardener's guitar twists and Loz Colbert's alternately gentle and punishing drumming. After the upbeat "Kaleidoscope," the record falls into a tempo lull that initially seems impenetrable and meandering. However, patience reveals a five-song suite of sorts, full of lovely instrumental passages that are punctuated with violent jabs of manic guitars. The endlessly escalating "Polar Bear" is a high point, featuring expertly placed tom rolls from Colbert. The tempo picks up for the closing "Vapour Trail," a wistful pop song with chiming background guitars galore and mournful strings to close it out. The U.S. version was bolstered significantly with the remainder of the Fall EP ("Dreams Burn Down" having reappeared earlier in the record). "Taste" is one of their finest pure pop numbers; the moody/driving "Here and Now" rates well, and the five-minute "Nowhere" is a nasty distorto-freakout. [Nowhere was remastered and reissued by Ignition U.K. in 2001. Added to the 11 tracks featured on Sire's U.S. edition are the four selections from the equally wondrous Today Forever.] © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
CD€14.99

Rock - Released November 30, 2011 | Rhino - Warner Records

From the sounds of the cloistered, chaotic opener, "Leave Them All Behind," Going Blank Again sounds like it could be headed down the same Nowhere path. Guitars as far as the ear can hear -- not much different from the effect gained after riding a sit-and-spin for eight straight minutes -- are just as dizzying as the prior record's opener. But rather than sink into a thick underbelly of melancholy, Going Blank Again offers sunshiney melodies and gleaming, bold production. All the band's elements are more pliable, and overall it's pretty cheery. In fact, some of the album could be loosely classified as power pop. Bouncy tunes like "Twisterella," "Not Fazed," "Mouse Trap," and "Time of Her Time" each share more than a thing or two in common with the likes of Teenage Fanclub, but with more layered vocals and less-cutting guitars. Though Ride's guitars don't bite as much, there are loads of them everywhere; the band doesn't completely sacrifice their love of reverberating noise, but it's more done in the name of pop than to merely cause a blistering racket. Though the lyrics often read as overtly simple or obtuse (a common Ride foible), Mark Gardener's and Andy Bell's voices are too pretty to let this shortcoming mar things. They create enough of a mood with their proper instruments, and their sighing and random vocal intonations are undeniably lovely. No longer do they hide shortcomings with sheets of distortion, and there's a lot more focus and confidence on display throughout. Don't let a Ride fan tell you otherwise: Going Blank Again is anything but empty. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
HI-RES€16.49
CD€11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released June 16, 2017 | Wichita Recordings

Hi-Res
Ride are making a return thanks to the shoegaze movement: and their resurrection has been eagerly awaited. 21 years after Tarantula, their third album which was not long remembered, the Oxford group are relaunching an act which was very popular across the Channel in the 1990s. With Weather Diaries, Mark Gardener and Andy Bell have not lost their touch for writing, but they have eliminated a number of purely shoegaze options. The Ride of 2017 is now a lot more pop and plays with guitars and synths, keeping their eyes on choruses that hit the mark, and melodies that stick around. Even if British pop won't quite be rocked to its foundations by this fourth album, it is hard to contain one's pleasure at this comeback. © CM/Qobuz
From
HI-RES€16.49
CD€11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 16, 2019 | Wichita Recordings

Hi-Res
Following their 2017 electronic comeback, Weather Diaries, Ride have been hard at work. Barely two years after the 90s shoegaze titans reformed, Andy Bell, Mark Gardener, Loz Colbert and Steve Queralt are out with This Is Not A Safe Place. The band’s new lease on life was anything but a fluke: their 6th studio album finds a calculated balance between dream pop, krautrock and electronic samples. Risk-taking, as implied by the title, is frequent, starting with the introduction, R.I.D.E. The nightmarish welcome blends in maniacal whispers that are simultaneously an invitation (Ride!) and a statement (Ride!). Then, the mood shifts considerably: Future Love promises budding romance over bittersweet shoegaze and jangle-pop guitar leads. The contrast between heartfelt rêveries and 80s style industrial bangers carries on through the rest of the album: Repetition anchors the latter style through a Juno-6 bass line which lends it a near-Kraftwerk vibe. Andy Bell had a few words about the song himself, saying “It was one of the very first songs written for the album, and has always felt to me like one of the best songs I've written.”. Well Andy, you could’ve said that about most of the songs on this record, and we’d be hard pressed to disagree. © Alexis Renaudat/Qobuz
From
CD€14.99

Rock - Released February 5, 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

Credit Ride for using only their own creative radar, completely ignoring all outside expectations for their third LP. Listeners could tell they had a love for the likes of the Byrds and Buffalo Springfield, but admiring the Black Crowes was practically out of the question for the scene that birthed them. Even Crowes producer George Drakoulias was called in to produce, but John Leckie ended up working on the majority. Fans generally didn't dig the classic vibe, and the lazy-daisy, pastoral record fared poorly. Carnival's first side largely consists of Mark Gardener's songs, while the latter is mainly Andy Bell's affair. Gardener's contributions are solid. "1000 Miles" lifts '60s jangle convincingly. "From Time to Time" is a "Vapour Trail" part two of sorts, lyrically, introduced with tasteful Rhodes tones from Andy Bell. Bell's songs, however, tend to falter. While he wrote the bulk of the band's prior top material, he's trumped here; in fact, Loz Colbert's "Natural Grace" wipes the mat with Bell's work. Perhaps Bell's ego was too big to recognize the lyrical shortcomings of "Crown of Creation," the poor Al Greenism of "Endless Road," and the outright flimsiness of "I Don't Know Where It Comes From," which features a kiddie choir. Despite the gaps in song quality and that hackneyed Creation cover, Carnival of Light creates a pleasant, freewheeling feeling throughout. The LP might have run better with the extraction of some of the duff, which is all the more frustrating when considering the quality of the B-sides from this period. Album number three, despite its troubles, remains a pleasant listen and was unlike anything released at the time in the U.K. [Ignition U.K. remastered and reissued the record in 2001, adding three of the several B-sides from the singles released in support of the LP.] © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
HI-RES€16.49
CD€11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 1, 2020 | Wichita Recordings

Hi-Res
From
CD€11.49

Alternative & Indie - Released November 20, 2011 | Ride Music

From
CD€2.99

Alternative & Indie - Released February 16, 2018 | Wichita Recordings

From
CD€14.99

Rock - Released February 5, 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

Here's where the plot got lost, an abomination of '70s/Lenny Kravitz clichés, full of third- and fourth-rate tunes and, ultimately, bad blood. Where Carnival of Light was a decent appropriation of late-'60s influences, here it's mere mimicry, going through the motions. No focus, no spirit, almost no quality songs -- Smaller Faces. Perhaps falling out of favor with the British press, only to be stomped upon by the likes of the Oasis phenomenon, nailed the coffin shut. The band even subbed for Oasis openers the Verve during one of the band's tours, before the recording of Tarantula, signifying a changing of the guard. Not helping the matter was a lack of ideas -- and a producer -- before entering the studio. Festering tension between Mark Gardener and Andy Bell came to a head, with Gardener walking out during the mixing process; just before the record was released in March of 1996, the band announced its breakup. Though "Black Nite Crash" and "Dead Man" are sub-Stones, sub-Faces and, well, sub-Ride, they're not half bad. Those are the bright spots, albeit relatively speaking. Gardener checks in with one lone song, the mediocre "Deep Inside My Pocket." And as Ride never had great lyricists, the words are just plain awful throughout, not even worth printing. Be warned: There's even a song detailing the myriad woes of life on the road. Most of the songs sound half-realized, sketches of what could only amount to decent material with the necessary retooling and enthusiasm. U.K. label Creation obviously didn't care for it, as it was deleted a week after its release. Unfortunately, it shouldn't have been released at all. Some might say it shouldn't have been recorded, either. (Ignition's 2001 U.K. edition adds the three OK B-sides off Black Nite Crash.) © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
CD€16.49

Alternative & Indie - Released June 4, 2007 | The Ride Partnership

A pairing of Ride's first two EPs, Smile is a batch of eight muddy, shambling wrecks that run dangerously close to obscuring great pop songs. In fact, much of Smile makes My Bloody Valentine's blurry Isn't Anything sound as polished as a Steely Dan record. What makes the tunes remarkable is the spirit of the band, along with a complementary mix. The band probably knew exactly what they were doing, but wanted to sound clueless. It's the sound of four art students losing themselves in their record collections, wanting to sound naïve and fresh but well-studied. Mark Gardener sounds like he couldn't sing to save his life on "Chelsea Girl," but it's no matter. The relentless rush of Loz Colbert's drums and distorted guitars of Gardener and Andy Bell carry the song, topped off by a nifty wah-wah climax. Though the mid-tempo, chugging "Drive Blind" could be taken literally, it could double as a metaphor for throwing oneself headlong into a relationship -- closing your eyes and not caring if a brick wall or cliff is up a mile ahead. The remainder is filled out with sticky riffs and melodies which avoid sounding like the standard pop fair. It sounds a bit amateurish, and Gardener and Bell hadn't quite found their footing vocally. Nonetheless, Smile brought something new to the table, and the U.K. audience and more adventurous U.S. fans clutched onto the sound for dear life. Rightfully so. [Oddly, Smile's mastering comes from the vinyl versions of the EPs. If you can track down the CD versions of the EPs separately, you'll notice a difference in quality. Also, the disc was remastered and reissued by Ignition in the U.K. in 2001; unlike the other releases in the campaign, the new version has no bonuses.] © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
CD€13.99

Rock - Released March 12, 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

It wasn't exactly fashionable to be a Ride fan in the early '90s. In certain nooks of the universe, wearing a Ride T-shirt meant you had to walk with your fists clenched, ready to defend your decrepit taste in music and do the pouncing before you got pounced upon. Often, you had to endure the taunts of your peers and the remainder of those who agreed with or were influenced by the majority of the British press who decided -- shortly after praising the band for their genius -- that they were ultimately a crap band. When it came to shoegaze, they weren't My Bloody Valentine, were they? As their tastes and influences changed and they began playing more "proper" rock & roll, they failed to write anything as anthemic as "Live Forever," right? Well to hell with all of that. In the nooks of the universe where it is okay to wear a Ride shirt, Nowhere is on par with Loveless for its own peculiar rush of swirling psychedelics and more prominent vocal hooks; Going Blank Again trumps Teenage Fanclub's Bandwagonesque because it exudes more power and focus; and 1994's Carnival of Light, with its roots in the Byrds and their ilk, is viewed more as prophecy than heresy. A copy of OX4: The Best of Ride is all you need for your defense now. Boasting a solid representation of each of Ride's albums, the band-selected compilation proves once and for all that Ride was one of the finest of the early '90s, they were capable of crafting brilliant melodies just as easily as their influences and competitors, and they never repeated themselves. So wear your Mark Gardener fringe with pride, blare "Unfamiliar" as loudly as possible, and keep Tarantula forever blocked from your memory. The U.S. version, released by First Time Records, added a second disc consisting of four of the previously unreleased tracks found on Ignition's import box set. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
CD€27.99

Rock - Released January 29, 2016 | Rhino - Warner Records

From
HI-RES€3.99
CD€2.99

Alternative & Indie - Released July 3, 2019 | Wichita Recordings

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€1.99
CD€1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released April 23, 2019 | Wichita Recordings

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€16.49
CD€11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 1, 2020 | Wichita Recordings

Hi-Res
From
CD€10.99

Electronic - Released June 29, 2018 | Wichita Recordings

From
CD€1.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 9, 2015 | Ride Music

From
CD€1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released January 9, 2018 | Wichita Recordings

From
CD€1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released November 3, 2017 | Wichita Recordings

From
HI-RES€1.99
CD€1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released June 9, 2017 | Wichita Recordings

Hi-Res