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Concertos - Released October 21, 2016 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Award - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released March 3, 2017 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Diapason d'or / Arte - 4 étoiles Classica
Brahms' two string sextets, like other works in the genre, are generally played by established string quartets with added players. Ad hoc groupings are rarely successful for quartets, and in these Brahms works -- some of the most intricate in terms of both balance and contrapuntal interaction that he ever wrote -- the odds of success would seem to be even lower. Yet this version, recorded live at the Aix-en-Provence Easter Festival in 2016, succeeds brilliantly, perhaps because of the presence of a pair of Capuçon brothers, perhaps because of the dominating presence of violinist Renaud Capuçon, who talks in the booklet about his longtime desire to record these pieces, or perhaps for some more elusive reason. It may be French Brahms, all delicacy and quiet and even humor, but delicacy works well in these pieces where so many details are hidden in the counterpoint. Sample the first movement of the String Sextet No. 2 in G major, Op. 36, where the tonal instability of the beginning, with everything growing from the marvelous leading-tone-to-tonic resolution, is nailed. In the hands of these players, the passage sounds like early Debussy, and yet its connections to the main body of the movement are palpable. Everywhere there is evidence of deep acquaintance with the work, even if the group came together only for this concert. The only downside is that the live sound is barely adequate, but this is Brahms to note well, even to treasure. © TiVo
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Concertos - Released October 14, 2013 | Warner Classics International

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
What you get here is something of a Saint-Saëns sampler, with a pair of famous concertos and a work for violin, cello, and orchestra that's not so famous and neatly ties the two outer concertos together. Soloist brothers Renaud Capuçon (violin) and Gautier Capuçon (cello) are pure representatives of the French school and of the way this music was taught when it was written. You get clean, noble tone, with stirring but never heavy renditions of the two concertos' exciting finales. Together with the work of the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France and conductor Lionel Bringuier, it's all perfect and elevating and balanced, maybe a little too perfect. The out-of-the-ordinary thing here is the entr'acte, La muse et le poète, which Saint-Saëns composed in 1910. There is no detailed program of the sort the title might suggest (the violin is the Muse), but the instruments do indeed evoke a creative process evolving out of an intimate dialogue, flowering into a full expression of melancholy. It's an enchanting little piece, and it's ideal for a concert or recording that features a violin and a cello, adding to the sparse repertory for that pair of instruments. (It also exists in a piano trio version.) A worthwhile rediscovery combined with fully competent readings of probably Saint-Saëns' two most familiar concertos makes a good place to start for anyone with the solo-and-orchestra music of this increasingly popular French composer. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 28, 2020 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or / Arte - Le Choix de France Musique
Any group performing Beethoven's piano trios must contend with the example of the famous readings by the Beaux Arts Trio, made in the middle 1960s and still in the catalog. Brothers Renaud and Gautier Capuçon, violinist and cellist respectively, with pianist Frank Braley deal with this anxiety of influence by rejecting the Beaux Arts model completely and offering listeners something new: elegant, even breezy Beethoven trios. Their tempos are quick and their balances subtle, nicely revealing many small details. Braley deserves special credit here, holding Beethoven's very active piano parts in check so that the violin and cello are never obscured, but still bringing a graceful quality to them. Some may feel that the first movement of the Piano Trio in B flat major, Op. 97 ("Archduke"), is at the very least atypical Beethoven, with the warm cello melody presented more as a cradle for future developments than as an outpouring of emotion. The slow movement of the Piano Trio in D major, Op. 70, No. 1 ("Ghost"), which gave the trio its name (for Czerny, not for Beethoven), is unusually delicately done here, and Erato's studio sound is another strong point. Recommended especially for those enamored of fresh Beethoven interpretations. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 5, 2005 | Warner Classics

Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc du Monde de la Musique
Is this what Gallic Brahms sounds like? Well, violinist Renaud Capuçon is French-born and French-trained, and pianist Nicholas Angelich, while America-born, is French-trained, but does this make them French musicians rather than musicians who are French? Possibly: Capuçon has the lean, lyrical tone that has been the specialty of French violinists since Louis Capet and Angelich has the lush, lucid tone that has been the specialty of French pianists since Walter Gieseking. But does that make Capuçon and Angelich's Brahms sonatas sound Gallic anymore than Oistrakh and Richter's Brahms sonatas sound Russian? Probably: Capuçon and Angelich's performances are more about the melody and the rhythm than about the harmony and structure, more about the players' relationship than about the music, more about getting there than being there. Are there French qualities? Surely: try to imagine Klemperer caring more about melody than harmony or Furtwängler caring more about getting there than being there. Still, for Gallic Brahms, these are lovely and powerful performances that will thrill listeners who love these works, whoever is performing them. Virgin's sound is cool but clear, vivid but reserved, an acoustic that suits the performers admirably. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 22, 2016 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released March 3, 2014 | Warner Classics International

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Classical - Released October 13, 2008 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released April 6, 2009 | EMI

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released November 27, 2020 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
It's always a good thing when a new recording fills a hole in the catalogue, and this all-Saint-Saëns chamber programme from seasoned collaborators Renaud Capuçon, Bertrand Chamayou and Edgar Moreau is one of those. Firstly because, while there already exists a generous smattering of readings of the first violin and cello sonatas from a range of top names, they tend not to be paired with each other. Plus, they've never been paired with the magnificent Piano Trio No. 2, which itself has been much less recorded. Add the fact that here we have not just three of France's finest artists, but among them the pianist who carried off Gramophone's “2019 Recording of the Year” precisely for his Saint-Saëns (recording of Concertos Nos. 2 & 5), there's a whole host of reasons why this album deserves your full attention. The Violin Sonata No. 1 gets things off to a great start. Dubbed the “Hippogriff Sonata” by Saint-Saëns on account of the near-mythical powers it requires of the violinist, this work demands not just supreme technique, but also a wide palette of colours, and the ability to apply them sometimes with the kind of nuance that suggests there's more going on emotionally than is perhaps sitting on the surface. Capuçon is well endowed with mystical technical powers, and they're in full play over this warm-toned performance delivered with unfailing elegance. Crucially also, the closeness of the dialogue between him and multi-coloured Chamayou yields a constant succession of pleasures that reach their apotheosis in the moto perpetuo virtuosities of the final Allegro molto. Equally crucially, the bright engineering has honoured the piano's importance, both in the overall balance, and in the clarity with which every single perfectly articulated, iridescent note of Chamayou's has been captured. The same holds true for the capturing of his piano concerto-esque virtuosities in the Cello Sonata No. 1, classily delivered by Moreau, who himself employs a satisfyingly wide dynamic range, while maintaining finesse of tone and attack even through the stormiest moments. Where this recording deserves reference status, however, is with the Trio. Just listen to the journey these three have taken us on even before we've made it to bar 20: the dramatically taut, forwards-propulsion of the piano's dark, opening chords; tonal matching from Capuçon and Moreau that's so exact through their passings of the melodic line that you really have to strain to hear where one stops and the other picks up; the myriad of colouristic nuances and shapings and fluctuations of temperature being brought by one and all to the music's moody rise and fall; then the glorious parting of the clouds from them as the E major second theme drops. Or, for an example at the other end of the work, listen to the impeccably tight chamber partnering on display through their deftly wrought, filigree fugue in the final movement. Also the achingly lovely upper register singing from Capuçon in that movement's (and indeed the entire trio's) softer, longer-lined moments. The whole thing is leaping out of the stereo from first to final chord, glowing, glittering, exciting and charming on every front. Highly recommended. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 12, 2018 | Warner Classics

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This release by violinist Renaud Capuçon is of the sort that comes with a disclaimer: although he enjoyed film music, Capuçon says, and even owned two albums of the stuff by Itzhak Perlman, he had "reservations" about recording it as a classical musician. The point of such displays of reluctance is not clear; few these days would contest the value of good film music, French as well as American. Capuçon touches on both, as well as some famous Italian pieces by Ennio Morricone and others. Despite his reluctance, he goes into full crossover mode and does it competently, extracting the maximum amount of sentiment before breaking the mood with more dramatic material and with one vocal interlude from Nolwenn Leroy. He pushes his basic lyrical tone into heavy-vibrato territory, but never goes over the edge, and both the violinist's basic fans and those in search of a French-flavored collection of film music (sample the unusual "Camille" from Jean-Luc Godard's Le Mépris) are likely to find the results satisfying. Capuçon gets strong support from the Brussels Philharmonic under Stéphane Denève. Highly recommended. © James Manheim /TiVo
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Classical - Released March 5, 2021 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
Conductor Simon Rattle is familiar with the rhapsodic Violin Concerto. In 1997, EMI Classics had published a version that became famous. It featured English violinist Nigel Kennedy, full of panache and wild virtuosity, especially in the final Allegro molto that must be taken both flexibly and firmly. The squaring of the circle! Kennedy and Rattle were exemplary. Here, Simon Rattle benefits from a much finer orchestra, the London Symphony Orchestra, the quintessential Elgarian phalanx, whose tradition of performances in this field was revived in the last two decades by Sir Colin Davis (who died in 2013).In the new Warner Classics version of this great concerto from the early twenty-first century, the performers favour moderation, with a sound that is sometimes rather monochrome. While Nikolaj Szeps-Znaider remains the modern herald of the work (with his perfect version accompanied by the Dresden Staatskapelle under Sir Colin Davis (RCA)), Renaud Capuçon's violin finds more colour in the chamber music, and the Sonata, recorded here with the excellent Stephen Hough, is of a very beautiful fluidity. These are 20 minutes of music which you should discover as a priority! © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Duets - Released March 27, 2019 | Erato

Hi-Res Booklet
On this record, Renaud Capuçon and David Fray decided to turn their back on the musicology-inspired understanding of baroque music. Enough of “the dictatorship of the historically informed.” They chose instead to play this music from the heart, just as the masters did in the previous century. Their choice is sincere in a field of numerous conflicts between schools of thoughts. Six sonatas for Violin and Harpsichord was composed by Bach when he was at the court of Coethen. It was especially admired by Carl Philipp Emanuel, the Cantor’s second son. As often happens, however, the autographed manuscript has disappeared and it is through series of copies that we know it today.  It was published for the first time in 1804, fifty years after Bach’s death. The six sonatas are written according to Corelli’s rules. They imagine a new type of dialogue in the chamber orchestra where keys are not in the background. The writing is precise, expressive, and rhythmical. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 3, 2014 | Erato - Warner Classics

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Classical - Released October 15, 2003 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released September 10, 2021 | Warner Classics

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"Arvo Pärt's music takes us from darkness to light", says Renaud Capuçon. "It looks relatively simple on paper, but each note needs to have its own life as it undergoes change. This music is not just relaxing - it has a depth and drama". Renaud Capuçon is the artistic director of the Orchestre de Chambre de Lausanne. His first recording with the ensemble is devoted to the Estonian composer Arvo Pärt and among the eight works on the album are Spiegel im Spiegel, Tabula Rasa and Silouan's Song. © Erato
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Classical - Released October 12, 2018 | Warner Classics

This release by violinist Renaud Capuçon is of the sort that comes with a disclaimer: although he enjoyed film music, Capuçon says, and even owned two albums of the stuff by Itzhak Perlman, he had "reservations" about recording it as a classical musician. The point of such displays of reluctance is not clear; few these days would contest the value of good film music, French as well as American. Capuçon touches on both, as well as some famous Italian pieces by Ennio Morricone and others. Despite his reluctance, he goes into full crossover mode and does it competently, extracting the maximum amount of sentiment before breaking the mood with more dramatic material and with one vocal interlude from Nolwenn Leroy. He pushes his basic lyrical tone into heavy-vibrato territory, but never goes over the edge, and both the violinist's basic fans and those in search of a French-flavored collection of film music (sample the unusual "Camille" from Jean-Luc Godard's Le Mépris) are likely to find the results satisfying. Capuçon gets strong support from the Brussels Philharmonic under Stéphane Denève. Highly recommended. © James Manheim /TiVo
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Classical - Released November 18, 2016 | Warner Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released March 27, 2019 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | Warner Classics

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Renaud Capuçon in the magazine