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Pop/Rock - Released June 1, 2012 | Legacy Recordings

Hi-Res Distinctions Exceptional Sound Recording - Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
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Pop/Rock - Released July 12, 2010 | Legacy Recordings

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released June 3, 2016 | Concord Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
"The Werewolf" opens Stranger to Stranger, Paul Simon's thirteenth solo studio album, with a heavy rhythmic thud -- bass, drums, and maracas lumbering along in a modified Bo Diddley beat not a far cry from the Who's "Slip Kid." Simon isn't looking to the past, though: he's writing toward an inevitable sunset, mindful of mortality -- just like he was on 2011's So Beautiful or So What -- but he's firmly grounded in a tumultuous present, embracing all the cut-and-paste contradictions endemic to the digital age. With the exception of a pair of hushed acoustic numbers and the expansive title track, all positioned to provide necessary pressure relief from the density of the rest of the record, Stranger to Stranger feels built from the rhythm up, a tactic familiar to Simon since 1986's Graceland. Unlike the easy gait of Graceland, the words here are clipped and rushed, sliding in with the bustle of the rhythm. It's not that the songs aren't melodic -- hooks arrive in snatches, sometimes forming through the rhythms themselves -- but the tracks are cloistered and colorful, accentuated by traces of gospel and doo wop; there's even an apparent "Love Is Strange" sample. Echoes of tradition existing within this modern framework are telling, underscoring how Simon is making music where the past is ever-present but not consuming: he's shifted his aesthetic to mirror his times, a tactic common in his solo career. In many ways, Stranger to Stranger is as bracing and ambitious as Surprise, his 2006 collaboration with producer Brian Eno -- this is especially true of its opening triptych, all created with Italian dance musician Clap! Clap! -- but the tenor of this album is different. Where the specter of 9/11 hung heavily over Surprise, Simon seems at peace on Stranger to Stranger, acknowledging the twilight yet not running toward it because there's so much to experience in the moment. He's choosing to push forward, not look back, and the results are invigorating. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released August 25, 1986 | Legacy Recordings

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Folk - Released July 12, 2010 | Legacy Recordings

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Folk - Released July 12, 2010 | Legacy Recordings

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Folk - Released May 5, 1973 | Legacy Recordings

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Folk - Released July 12, 2010 | Legacy Recordings

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Folk - Released July 12, 2010 | Legacy Recordings

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Pop - Released April 8, 2011 | Legacy Recordings

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Folk - Released July 12, 2010 | Legacy Recordings

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Folk - Released July 12, 2010 | Legacy Recordings

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Rock - Released September 7, 2018 | Legacy Recordings

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As the saying goes, if you want something done right, you’d better do it yourself. This is why Paul Simon entrusted the cover of his own songs to… Paul Simon! Except that Art Garfunkel’s former accomplice completely reshapes his past tracks. Ten songs in total, forgotten for the most part, handpicked from his albums There Goes Rhymin' Simon (1973), Still Crazy After All These Years (1975), One-Trick Pony (1980), Hearts and Bones (1983), The Rhythm of the Saints (1990), You're the One (2000) and So Beautiful or So What (2011). By re-orchestrating them as jazz − sometimes even classical − pieces (gone with his folk and world temptations!), he folds his art flat and demonstrates how timeless his compositions are. For such a refined stylistic exercise, Simon surrounded himself with musicians as legendary as himself. Wynton Marsalis’ trumpet, Bill Frisell’s guitar, Bryce Dessner’s (from The National) arrangements, Jack DeJohnette and Steve Gadd’s drums, Joe Lovano’s saxophone, young Sullivan Fortner’s piano as well as John Patitucci’s bass further reinforce the project. But beyond this star-loaded panel, In The Blue Light truly fascinates for its unusual melancholy. At 76 years old, Paul Simon hasn’t authored a legacy piece, but rather the work of a wise man who glances in the rear-view mirror with great originality. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Pop/Rock - Released June 9, 2017 | Legacy Recordings

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When you're an institution like Paul Simon, and strictly speaking you don't have anything to prove, you can do whatever you like. So surely Art Garfunkel's former bandmate was doing exactly that when he recorded this ample (two hours!) live set in Hyde Park in London on 15 July 2012, as part of the Hard Rock Calling Festival. As so often in this kind of situation, when the artist possesses an XXL-sized body of work and discography, the recording plays the role of a kind of Best Of. And that is precisely what it is. All Paul Simon’s hits get an airing here, in pretty vigorous versions. The concert reunites Hugh Masekela and Ladysmith Black Mambazo, who were present on the album Graceland, but also features a guest appearance by the great Jimmy Cliff. Solo career (Kodachrome, Graceland, Me And Julio Down By The Schoolyard, 50 Ways To Leave Your Lover) or works from the Simon & Garfunkel period (The Boxer), nothing is missing from this first-rate performance. © CM/Qobuz
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Folk - Released July 12, 2010 | Legacy Recordings

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Rock - Released June 3, 2016 | Concord Records

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"The Werewolf" opens Stranger to Stranger, Paul Simon's thirteenth solo studio album, with a heavy rhythmic thud -- bass, drums, and maracas lumbering along in a modified Bo Diddley beat not a far cry from the Who's "Slip Kid." Simon isn't looking to the past, though: he's writing toward an inevitable sunset, mindful of mortality -- just like he was on 2011's So Beautiful or So What -- but he's firmly grounded in a tumultuous present, embracing all the cut-and-paste contradictions endemic to the digital age. With the exception of a pair of hushed acoustic numbers and the expansive title track, all positioned to provide necessary pressure relief from the density of the rest of the record, Stranger to Stranger feels built from the rhythm up, a tactic familiar to Simon since 1986's Graceland. Unlike the easy gait of Graceland, the words here are clipped and rushed, sliding in with the bustle of the rhythm. It's not that the songs aren't melodic -- hooks arrive in snatches, sometimes forming through the rhythms themselves -- but the tracks are cloistered and colorful, accentuated by traces of gospel and doo wop; there's even an apparent "Love Is Strange" sample. Echoes of tradition existing within this modern framework are telling, underscoring how Simon is making music where the past is ever-present but not consuming: he's shifted his aesthetic to mirror his times, a tactic common in his solo career. In many ways, Stranger to Stranger is as bracing and ambitious as Surprise, his 2006 collaboration with producer Brian Eno -- this is especially true of its opening triptych, all created with Italian dance musician Clap! Clap! -- but the tenor of this album is different. Where the specter of 9/11 hung heavily over Surprise, Simon seems at peace on Stranger to Stranger, acknowledging the twilight yet not running toward it because there's so much to experience in the moment. He's choosing to push forward, not look back, and the results are invigorating. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Folk - Released March 23, 2004 | Columbia - Legacy

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The first album to use this title is one of the most mysterious in Paul Simon's output and almost belongs more with Simon & Garfunkel's discography, given its 1965 recording date. Following the failure of Simon & Garfunkel's first, all-acoustic folk revival-style album, Wednesday Morning, 3 AM, Simon headed off to England to see about pursuing music over there. While he was in London, he found himself in demand as a visiting American "folksinger" (though Simon's credentials in this area were rather limited), began building up a following in the coffeehouses, and was eventually pegged for a performing spot on the BBC. Suddenly, there were requests for Paul Simon recordings, of which there were none -- as a result of his being signed to Columbia Records in America, however, he was brought into the London studios of British CBS and recorded this album with only his acoustic guitar for backup. The resulting album is spare, almost minimalist, as Simon runs through raw and unaffected versions of songs that he was known for in London, including "The Sounds of Silence," "The Sun Is Burning," "I Am a Rock," "A Simple Desultory Philippic" (in its earliest form, and far nastier than the version later done by Simon & Garfunkel), and "Kathy's Song." The notes are very, very strange, but a bigger problem is the production by Reginald Warburton and Stanley West, which isn't terribly sympathetic; the sound isn't very natural, being very close and booming, but the album is a fascinating artifact of Simon's work during the interregnum in Simon & Garfunkel's career. And there is one fascinating number here, "The Side of a Hill," which eventually resurfaced as the countermelody song in the Simon & Garfunkel version of "Scarborough Fair" (a song curious by its absence here, considering that Simon was doing it in his coffeehouse appearances) two years later. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Folk - Released July 12, 2010 | Legacy Recordings

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Pop - Released October 11, 2013 | Legacy Recordings

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Pop - Released September 18, 2012 | Legacy Recordings