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Classical - Released October 22, 2012 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Record of the Year - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released October 14, 2013 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released September 12, 2014 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
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Chamber Music - Released September 15, 2008 | naïve classique

Booklet Distinctions 9 de Classica-Répertoire
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Concertos - Released September 7, 2009 | naïve classique

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Classical - Released March 24, 2014 | ECM New Series

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Classical - Released September 20, 2010 | naïve classique

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released October 8, 2021 | Alpha Classics

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This album celebrates a musical rapport that has lasted for twenty years and, above all, a true friendship: "We’re like two sisters, on stage and in life", as Patricia Kopatchinskaja and Sol Gabetta like to say. In parallel with their dazzling solo careers, they have frequently got together for concerts in trio or double concerto formation (like the one written for them by Francisco Coll, recently released on Alpha Classics). But they have conceived this recording for a rather rare combination, the violin-cello duo – with the aim of choosing pieces they found interesting either stylistically or for the way they use the instruments. The programme includes the Duo written by Zoltán Kodály in 1914, which was not premiered until 1924, two years after Maurice Ravel’s Sonata for Violin and Cello, along with a few forays into the Baroque period (Leclair, Scarlatti, Bach) and, of course, works by twenty-first-century composers to whom the two soloists are very close: Jörg Widmann, Francisco Coll and Julien-François Zbinden are on the itinerary of this introspective journey into the generous world of two total artists. © Alpha Classics
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Classical - Released April 9, 2021 | Alpha Classics

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Pierrot lunaire, premiered in Berlin in 1912, is a series of twenty-one short melodramas for voice and five instruments on German translations of poems by Albert Giraud. Here the composer first introduces "Sprechgesang" (speech-song), a technique that revolutionised declamation. Schoenberg wanted the piece to be ironic, at once tender and grotesque, in the manner of cabaret songs. Patricia Kopatchinskaja, the violinist who is also an occasional actress, had long dreamt of playing and reciting this unique work. It was a pain in her arm preventing her from playing the violin that one day propelled her into the role of narrator: ‘All my life I have felt that I was Pierrot. Every time I played this piece on the violin when I was a student, I would say the words in my head’. She has now played and performed Pierrot in many venues around the world, including the Berlin Philharmonie, several cities in the United States, the Netherlands, Switzerland and Sweden. Now she has assembled a number of her musician friends and decided to record it for posterity. Schoenberg’s Phantasy Op. 47 and Six Little Piano Pieces Op. 19 complete the programme, along with works by Webern (Four Pieces for Violin and Piano, Op. 7) and Schoenberg’s arrangement of Johann Strauss Jr.’s Kaiser-Walzer, Op. 437. © Alpha Classics
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Classical - Released May 21, 2021 | PentaTone

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The Orchestre Philharmonique de Luxembourg and Gustavo Gimeno continue their acclaimed Pentatone series of composer portraits with a monograph of a living composer, Francisco Coll. In Coll’s music, the past and present converge in a single space, by realising a contemporary sound world while creatively employing traditional forms and influences, be it a classical genre (Violin Concerto and the “grotesque symphony” Mural) or his musical roots (Four Iberian Miniatures). With pieces composed between 2005 and 2019, the album traces Coll’s spectacular musical development, from his studies under Thomas Adès in London to his present bloom. The lush, sensuous nature of his orchestral writing fully comes to life in these performances. Besides the strong relationship between Coll and conductor Gimeno, this new release also showcases the exceptional violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja, for whom he has written several works, including his Violin Concerto, first recorded here. © Pentatone
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Symphonic Music - Released November 2, 2018 | audite Musikproduktion

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Classical - Released January 8, 2021 | Alpha Classics

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This recording presents the double concerto for violin, cello and orchestra of the Spanish composer Francisco Coll, born in 1985. Les Plaisirs illuminés, a title inspired by Dalí’s painting of the same name, is rooted in Spanish traditions, including flamenco, yet is resolutely modern: ‘Its music is very lively rhythmically, it dances and sings – but at the same time it is very abrupt, always in search of extremes’, says Patricia Kopatchinskaja.,For this world premiere conducted by the composer, she is reunited with a longstanding partner who pursues an equally brilliant international career, the cellist Sol Gabetta. The programme also features the Musica concertante for twelve strings by the Hungarian-born Swiss composer Sándor Veress, premiered by the Camerata in Bern in 1966. A year earlier, the Argentinian composer Alberto Ginastera wrote his fascinating Concerto for Strings. A kaleidoscope of colours and sounds from all over the world. © Alpha Classics
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Classical - Released September 4, 2020 | Alpha Classics

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Giovanni Antonini and his ensemble Il Giardino Armonico celebrate the composer who made them famous: Antonio Vivaldi. Their recordings of the Four Seasons and Cecilia Bartoli’s famous first Vivaldi recital left an indelible mark on the discography of the Red-haired Priest! Their musical fireworks display continues with a programme of concertos that is bound to provoke strong reactions, since it is the result of a meeting with a musician who is equally adept at shifting boundaries, the violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja. Together they have devised a programme which interweaves ultra-virtuosic concertos by Vivaldi ("Il Grosso Mogul" RV 208, "La Tempesta di Mare" RV 253, and RV 157, 191, 550 among others) with, between each concerto, short pieces written by much more recent composers, Luca Francesconi, Simone Movio, Giacinto Scelsi, Aureliano Cattaneo and Giovanni Sollima, and mostly commissioned by Patricia Kopatchinskaja especially for this programme. © Alpha Classics
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Classical - Released April 9, 2021 | Alpha Classics

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Pierrot lunaire, premiered in Berlin in 1912, is a series of twenty-one short melodramas for voice and five instruments on German translations of poems by Albert Giraud. Here the composer first introduces "Sprechgesang" (speech-song), a technique that revolutionised declamation. Schoenberg wanted the piece to be ironic, at once tender and grotesque, in the manner of cabaret songs. Patricia Kopatchinskaja, the violinist who is also an occasional actress, had long dreamt of playing and reciting this unique work. It was a pain in her arm preventing her from playing the violin that one day propelled her into the role of narrator: ‘All my life I have felt that I was Pierrot. Every time I played this piece on the violin when I was a student, I would say the words in my head’. She has now played and performed Pierrot in many venues around the world, including the Berlin Philharmonie, several cities in the United States, the Netherlands, Switzerland and Sweden. Now she has assembled a number of her musician friends and decided to record it for posterity. Schoenberg’s Phantasy Op. 47 and Six Little Piano Pieces Op. 19 complete the programme, along with works by Webern (Four Pieces for Violin and Piano, Op. 7) and Schoenberg’s arrangement of Johann Strauss Jr.’s Kaiser-Walzer, Op. 437. © Alpha Classics
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Classical - Released September 13, 2019 | Alpha Classics

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Patricia Kopatchinskaja has constructed a programme entitled Time and Eternity around the masterpiece which is Concerto funebre by Karl-Amadeus Hartmann, written in 1939 as an act of resistance against the Nazi regime. With the Bern Camerata – of which she is the artistic director – she blazes a bright trail of memory with her violin. The works follow a pattern, like a syncretistic rosary, where traditional songs (Kol Nidre, Elijahu Hanawi, one Polish prayer, one Orthodox) are prolonged by scores from the repertoire: John Zorn and his Kol Nidre where notes held at a drone across several octaves envelop the melodic fragments of the original melody in a liturgical echo chamber; Frank Martin and his Polyptyque for Violin and Orchestra, written in 1973 for Yehudi Menuhin, with an aching lyricism inspired by the painting of the Passion of the Christ by Buoninsegna; Machaut and the Kyrie of his Messe de Notre-Dame, almost contemporary in this arrangement for strings played in a great variety of ways; Bach and a choice of chorales, in particular the Ach großer König from the St John Passion. This dialogue between pieces from distant eras and cultures – six hundred years of music to raise the voices of the victims, as Patricia Kopatchinskaja sums it up – is an expression of a collective pardon. Consoling breaths are worked in between pieces which make great demands on the listener. The violinist, who has recorded Poulenc, Bartók and Ravel for the same label not long ago, never ceases to amaze us. This album proves once more that she is a formidably intelligent musician, gifted with a powerful imagination! © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 14, 2016 | Alpha Classics

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This "collaborative exploration" of Schubert's String Quartet in D minor, D. 810 ("Death and the Maiden"), is experimental even by the standards of violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja and the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra. It offers the Schubert quartet itself, in an arrangement for string orchestra by Kopatchinskaja herself, that preserves the original quartet forces in some passages; between its movements come other works by Augustus Nörmiger, John Dowland, Carlo Gesualdo, and György Kurtág, along with a piece of Byzantine chant, all of them on the theme of death and often making specific musical reference to the content of the Schubert. Sample Dowland's Pavana Lachrimae and the Andante of the Schubert for an idea of what Kopatchinskaja is up to. Obviously, Schubert's work here serves merely as a stimulus for further creative activity, and your response to Kopatchinskaja's work may depend on your general attitude toward this class of idea. But what she does would not have been totally foreign to the Romantics, who thought nothing of breaking up multi-movement works. Too, the album has something of the flavor of Renaissance masses as they were meant to be performed, with the movements separated by other works relevant to the occasion. For most, Kopatchinskaja's collaborative exploration will intrigue. © TiVo
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Classical - Released July 6, 2018 | New Focus Recordings

Booklet
While the Violin Concerto from 2016 by Michael Hersch (born 1971) seems like a frightful chaos, the work soon takes a more linear and legible turn, even though its content remains tremendously violent from end to end, even in those less frenetic passages where the melodic line seems to warn of impending danger... The work was commissioned by violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja, who is an ardent supporter of music less ordinary, which requires nerve and endurance. As for end stages (all lower case in the title) from 2017, it explores the "end stages" of musical discourse, an apparent allusion by the composer to the illness and deaths of loved ones which have dogged him for years. The eight movements, far from fading away, give the impression of slowly closing in on themselves. The famous Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, to which the work is dedicated, performs it here. As it is wonted to do, the ensemble plays without a conductor, which is a terrific tour de force, given a score of such complexity. But as each musician is forced to listen to the other, the concentration is extreme – and it shows. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released February 23, 2018 | Alpha Classics

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The least that one could say about the art of Moldavian violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja is that one cannot be left indifferent by it - so completely does she set herself apart from her "smoother", more mainstream peers. One only needs to hear her explosive reading of Ravel's Tzigane, where she is particularly daring: the result is extravagant, but in reality, it is wholly in keeping with the spirit of this score, which too many violinists play prissily: after listening to this, you'll not want to hear it played any other way. Kopatchinskaja murmurs, rages, dreams, swoons, surges, explodes, caresses, grips, undulates, chirrups and slaps through the ten minutes of this humorous, provocative, bravura performance. Doubtless the serious Bartók wouldn't have relished Ravel's pseudo-Hungarian allusions - not understanding that the French composer was simply lampooning the Viennese pseudo-Hungarian-Tzigane style - going by his Second Sonata for Violin and Piano, which is both dogmatically Magyar and Bartókian, a rather gruff piece all in all. Much less gruff is the sumptuous Sonata by Poulenc, written in 1943 in a tone which is sometimes tragic - even if the facetious Poulenc undertakes his own personal Resistance by working into each of his three movements a quotation from Tea for Two, a song forbidden under the Occupation. Pianist Polia Leschenko offers the violinist a breather with the short but efficient waltz  Coppelia by Dohnanyi, a little Franco-Hungarian wink, a prelude to the big wink Tzigane, which crowns the album. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released May 17, 2019 | New Focus Recordings

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Classical - Released March 24, 2014 | ECM New Series