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Jazz - Released February 3, 2014 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released June 8, 2012 | Nonesuch

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Le top 6 JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released December 1, 1975 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
For a first attempt, it's a masterstroke! Released in 1976, Bright Size Life was Pat Metheny's first record as a leader. Just 21 years old, the American guitarist already showed a real maturity as a virtuosic composer and performer. He joined forces with Jaco Pastorius on bass and Bob Moses on a flexible and dynamic drum kit. These ideal accomplices allowed him to develop what would later become his trademark sound: a fluid and often lyrical style. The wide, open spaces of his native Midwest were reflected in his guitar playing as well as in the track titles (Missouri Uncompromised, Midwestern Nights Dream and Omaha Celebration). A great wisdom emerged from this clear and beautiful album (Jim Hall's influence is evident) which closes with Round Trip/Broadway Blues, an unexpected medley of two pieces by Ornette Coleman, one of Metheny's idols, with whom he would go on to record Song X ten years later. But underneath this calm surface, this young virtuoso wanted to change the world. He explained this in an interview with Just Jazz Guitar in 2001: “Even though Bright Size Life may not sound like it, we were pissed off. That album is a very strong political statement from us on how we felt about what our instruments needed to do to remain relevant in jazz. Listening to it now, with 25 years of perspective, I think our message got across, I believe we did change things. That album was a manifesto of some very specific things that we felt strongly about, in terms of harmony, in terms of interaction, in terms of the sound of the instruments. You have to listen to that album to hear where we were at that time.” © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released December 1, 1975 | ECM

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
For a first attempt, it's a masterstroke! Released in 1976, Bright Size Life was Pat Metheny's first record as a leader. Just 21 years old, the American guitarist already showed a real maturity as a virtuosic composer and performer. He joined forces with Jaco Pastorius on bass and Bob Moses on a flexible and dynamic drum kit. These ideal accomplices allowed him to develop what would later become his trademark sound: a fluid and often lyrical style. The wide, open spaces of his native Midwest were reflected in his guitar playing as well as in the track titles (Missouri Uncompromised, Midwestern Nights Dream and Omaha Celebration). A great wisdom emerged from this clear and beautiful album (Jim Hall's influence is evident) which closes with Round Trip/Broadway Blues, an unexpected medley of two pieces by Ornette Coleman, one of Metheny's idols, with whom he would go on to record Song X ten years later. But underneath this calm surface, this young virtuoso wanted to change the world. He explained this in an interview with Just Jazz Guitar in 2001: “Even though Bright Size Life may not sound like it, we were pissed off. That album is a very strong political statement from us on how we felt about what our instruments needed to do to remain relevant in jazz. Listening to it now, with 25 years of perspective, I think our message got across, I believe we did change things. That album was a manifesto of some very specific things that we felt strongly about, in terms of harmony, in terms of interaction, in terms of the sound of the instruments. You have to listen to that album to hear where we were at that time.” © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released May 6, 2016 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1983 | ECM

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
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Jazz - Released May 17, 2013 | Nonesuch

Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
On his own recordings, Pat Metheny has always pushed his artistic envelope. Very occasionally when moving to the outside, it's been to the chagrin of some fans. It happened with Ornette Coleman on the brilliant Song X in 1985; next was on the screaming guitar effort Zero Tolerance for Silence in 1994, and finally on his collaboration with Derek Bailey on The Sign of 4 in 1997. But while his collaboration with another true American original, the prolific composer John Zorn, is outside work for Metheny, it may not alienate longtime fans due to its relative accessibility. The Book of Angels is the composer's second book of compositions based on ancient, often mystical Jewish music; it contains over 300 pieces. These works have set melodies but leave plenty of room for other musicians to interpret and add to them. Other than drums -- played by Antonio Sanchez -- Metheny performs everything: guitars, orchestrion, piano, bass, bandoneon, bells, even flügelhorn. He takes Zorn's mysterious compositions and completely recontextualizes them while remaining true to them. Metheny introduces new musical ideas, myriad textural flights, and rhythmic invention to these works with a wide colorist's palette. "Mastema," with its hypnotic theme, is adorned by rock drumming from Sanchez, who handles the 11/8 signature with ease, while Metheny layers numerous countrapuntal guitars, backmasked, wailing solos, and shifting orchestrion pulses to dynamic result. Likewise, the contemplative acoustic guitars of "Albim" give way to a shimmering swing that adds tinges of tango and Brazilian music -- it wouldn't have been out of place on one of his own albums. The heart of "Tharsis" is a klezmer melody. Acoustic guitars, percussion, guitar synth, and piano display Metheny's signature euphoric interiority and balance with the inherent lyricism in Zorn's tune even as Sanchez forcefully pushes at the tempo. "Sariel" uses tiples, baritone, and high-stringed guitars to shape the melody. It's like a choir of ouds. As the piece develops, chord structures advance the sketch, and eventually Sanchez enters, adding a rock thrust. Metheny piles on electric guitars and basses to go on an extended workout, soaring with harmonic ideas and textural elements that resemble those from Italian film scores of the 1970s and '80s. No matter how unfettered his imagination runs on these pieces, neither he nor Zorn disappear. The set's closer, "Hurmiz," may raise a few eyebrows. Metheny plays piano in a duet with Sanchez that suggests free jazz, though the attention to space, form, and lyricism is inherent. Tap: John Zorn's Book of Angels, Vol. 20 is a special album in both men's catalogs. (It's being released simultaneously on both Nonesuch and Tzadik.) These compositions offer Metheny something that he's seldom been able to take advantage of. While he's regularly performed the works of other composers, he has seldom had the opportunity to so thoroughly orchestrate and arrange them. Ironically, this collaboration has resulted in giving him the freedom to explore his artistic expression as an individual, at a deeper level. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Classical - Released March 5, 2021 | Modern Recordings

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Pat Metheny, always ready to challenge himself, is back and pulling a double backflip with a decidedly hybrid album, onto which he has invited five virtuoso colleagues who are every bit his equal. For Road to the Sun, the American guitarist brought in Jason Vieaux, a contemporary master of classical guitar, to play Four Paths of Light, his suite for guitar. The centrepiece of the record is Road to the Sun, a six-movement work performed by the Los Angeles Guitar Quartet (John Dearman, William Kanengiser, Scott Tennant and Matthew Greif). Finally, Metheny, who designed and arranged the whole work, revisits Arvo Pärt's Für Alina alone, with his 42-string guitar. This work, originally written for piano, closes the album. It represents a new peak of purity for this performer who hits all the right notes... This "classic" outing is not his first: most notably, he has previously recorded Steve Reich's Electric Counterpoint. This time, however, the tone is more scholarly and sometimes finds its source in the works of composers such as Francisco Tárrega. But the Metheny touch hasn't gone anywhere. Every second of this record is alive with colours that will enchant both lovers of, and newcomers to, the classical guitar. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released September 10, 2021 | Modern Recordings

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Once a child prodigy, and then a flashy youth, guitarist Pat Metheny has now become a jazz elder. As such he's made the selfless decision to return the favor of the older players who mentored him, by working with a cadre of young players, showing them the ropes of touring, and allowing them, as he puts it in the liner notes of Side-Eye, the chance to develop through the "prism" of his experience. With an organ trio (numbered IV hence the title) anchored by 26-year-old multi-keyboardist James Francies, Metheny recorded a set of new compositions and re-imagined older originals in a September 2019 concert at New York's Sony Hall. Captured in full, dynamic sound by engineer Pete Karam and co-produced by longtime Metheny cohort Steve Rodby—both of whom are prominently credited in the liner notes—the partnership of Metheny and Francies opens with a new composition, the long, straight-ahead workout "It Starts When We Disappear." Innovative drummer Marcus Gilmore (Vijay Iyer, Ambrose Akinmusire) establishes a fast swinging rhythm over which Metheny, on guitar, bass, guitar synth and orchestrionics (his word for a plethora of electronic and acoustic instruments he controls), picks out crystalline guitar notes whose signature ringing tone has become as unmistakable as Miles Davis' muted horn. That's followed by a shadowy reworking of "Better Days Ahead" (from 1989's Letter from Home) on which Francies is generously credited as arranger. (Metheny notes, Francies "brought a vibe" that provided "a fresh way of looking at it.") On a funky, R&B-influenced version of another Metheny original, "Timeline" (first recorded by the late Michael Brecker), Francies adds quavering B-3 organ textures while Gilmore swings madly. In another typically stellar Metheny set of nothing but highlights, two additional tracks do stand out however. Covering Ornette Coleman's bluesy "Turnaround," Metheny and Francies trade solos, often stepping out completely, leaving the other with only Gilmore's steady support over which their economical expressions pour forth. And for anyone who's ever wondered where Metheny might stack up in the pantheon of rock guitarists, there's "Lodger"—no relation to the Bowie album of the same name. Switching to what sounds like a solid body electric Les Paul, he tastefully cuts loose, in a jazz-influenced kind of way on the instrumental power ballad. Right on cue, an appreciative crowd hoots their approval. With a hint of the fruitful keyboard and guitar partnership with Lyle Mays that energized many of the guitarist's most famous albums, Side-Eye NYC (V1.IV) is the sound of master and his apprentice further enriching the Metheny legacy. © Robert Baird/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released February 21, 2020 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet
According to Pat Metheny, From This Place is not just another album to add to his already super-size discography. “I have been waiting my whole life to make this record,” the guitarist from Missouri says outright. “It’s a kind of musical culmination, reflecting a wide range of expressions that have interested me over the years, scaled across a large canvas, presented in a way that offers the kind of opportunities for communication that can only be earned with a group of musicians who have spent hundreds of nights together on the bandstand.” With his longtime collaborator, drummer Antonio Sanchez along with bassist Linda May Han Oh, pianist Gwilym Simcock and the Hollywood Studio Symphony conducted by Joel McNeely, Metheny begins his ambitious project with a composition of over thirteen minutes, America Undefined, centred around a beautiful arrangement by Gil Goldstein. The lyricism of the theme, the theatrical arches and the inspired but never over zealous interjections from the guitar come together to form this majestic landscape. Pat Metheny manages to avoid falling into the classic traps of symphonic jazz, instead proving to be quite the master of creating an amazing melodic line. This is not surprising, as already with the release of As Falls Wichita, So Falls Wichita Falls with ECM in 1981, an album he made with keyboard player Lyle Mays (who passed away 15 days before the release of From This Place), he excelled in perfectly calibrated lyrical narration. This level of craftsmanship returns on Same River, a prime example of the kind of composition that could easily fall into the banal or the tear-jerking but manages to remain purely beautiful. With Meshell Ndegeocello on vocals, Grégoire Maret on the harmonica and Luis Conte on percussion for certain tracks, the American guitarist has carefully chosen his guests, whose contributions only serve to confirm the precision of Metheny’s vision, a concept much more easily understood after listening to the album in full. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Bebop - Released June 14, 2011 | Nonesuch

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Bebop - Released April 24, 2009 | Nonesuch

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Jazz - Released September 23, 2007 | Nonesuch

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1981 | ECM

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1977 | ECM

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Bebop - Released October 3, 2008 | Nonesuch

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1980 | ECM

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In 1980, Pat Metheny had already garnered an impressive level of popularity. With sold out tours and their consequential album sales, the guitarist had imposed upon the scene a sound and style which was already being adopted by others. And under the banner of the Pat Metheny Group with Lyle Mays, Mark Egan and Danny Gottlieb, this success was furthered all the more. But some of jazz’s ayatollahs were still somewhat sceptical of his youth-carried success (Metheny himself was only 25 at the time)… With 80/81, which was recorded in May 1980 under the label ECM, things were soon to change. At the long-haired guitarist’s side was Munich-based producer Manfred Eicher. Eicher had the judicious idea of uniting, in Oslo’s Talent Studios, a pianist-free group comprising of four incontestable big names: bassist Charlie Haden, drummer Jack DeJohnette and tenor saxophonists Dewey Redman and Michael Brecker. What could have been merely a flashy and pointless casting turned out to be quite the opposite! On this copious one hour and twenty minute double album that’s as electric (on the beginning and end sections of the record) as it is acoustic, Pat Metheny shows all his colours, and writes the best part of the songs himself. Most importantly, these famed sidemen are stylistically a long-shot from his usual musical compadres. And the exchanges between this most-harmonious five are incredibly inspiring. Former musicians in Keith Jarett’s 1971-1976 quartet and match made in heaven, Charlie Haden and Dewey Redman seamlessly accommodate our young guitar maestro. No shock if you are aware of the relationship Metheny and Haden, both ailing from Missouri (they would record together some years later), have for North American folkloric music which shines through on this album. DeJohnette expertly weaves in and out of this tight canvas and is a central part of 80/81. The drummer carries a voice here that succeeds in standing out whilst remaining in harmony with others. And on songs like Open it is impossible to tear away your ear for even a second from the magical sound of his drumsticks. Finally, the saxophonists voices are opposing yet succeed in cementing their own place (Brecker is on fire on the opening of Two Folk Songs and Redman playful on his solo in Pretty Scattered). A double album which, as the years go by and after multiple listens, will stand strong among the vast discography of its artist. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1980 | ECM

In 1980, Pat Metheny had already garnered an impressive level of popularity. With sold out tours and their consequential album sales, the guitarist had imposed upon the scene a sound and style which was already being adopted by others. And under the banner of the Pat Metheny Group with Lyle Mays, Mark Egan and Danny Gottlieb, this success was furthered all the more. But some of jazz’s ayatollahs were still somewhat sceptical of his youth-carried success (Metheny himself was only 25 at the time)… With 80/81, which was recorded in May 1980 under the label ECM, things were soon to change. At the long-haired guitarist’s side was Munich-based producer Manfred Eicher. Eicher had the judicious idea of uniting, in Oslo’s Talent Studios, a pianist-free group comprising of four incontestable big names: bassist Charlie Haden, drummer Jack DeJohnette and tenor saxophonists Dewey Redman and Michael Brecker. What could have been merely a flashy and pointless casting turned out to be quite the opposite! On this copious one hour and twenty minute double album that’s as electric (on the beginning and end sections of the record) as it is acoustic, Pat Metheny shows all his colours, and writes the best part of the songs himself. Most importantly, these famed sidemen are stylistically a long-shot from his usual musical compadres. And the exchanges between this most-harmonious five are incredibly inspiring. Former musicians in Keith Jarett’s 1971-1976 quartet and match made in heaven, Charlie Haden and Dewey Redman seamlessly accommodate our young guitar maestro. No shock if you are aware of the relationship Metheny and Haden, both ailing from Missouri (they would record together some years later), have for North American folkloric music which shines through on this album. DeJohnette expertly weaves in and out of this tight canvas and is a central part of 80/81. The drummer carries a voice here that succeeds in standing out whilst remaining in harmony with others. And on songs like Open it is impossible to tear away your ear for even a second from the magical sound of his drumsticks. Finally, the saxophonists voices are opposing yet succeed in cementing their own place (Brecker is on fire on the opening of Two Folk Songs and Redman playful on his solo in Pretty Scattered). A double album which, as the years go by and after multiple listens, will stand strong among the vast discography of its artist. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released September 12, 2006 | Nonesuch

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Jazz - Released November 5, 1999 | Warner Jazz

The soundtrack to the Sigourney Weaver/Julianne Moore film A Map Of The World features an acoustic guitar-based score written and performed by Pat Metheny. Along with his complete score for the film, the album also includes 25 minutes of expanded versions of the movie's music. The title track, "Fall From Grace," "Outcasts" and "Homecoming" reflect the film's bittersweet tone. © Heather Phares /TiVo