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Rock - Released May 15, 2020 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released December 4, 2020 | Music For Nations

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Pop/Rock - Released April 1, 2011 | Sony Music UK

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Pop - Released June 2, 2015 | Century Media

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Pop/Rock - Released June 1, 1993 | Music For Nations

Icon represents a turning point for Paradise Lost: vocalist Nick Holmes loses the limiting growl in favor of a James Hetfield-style bark and Gregorian chants, while mastermind Gregor Mackintosh (lead guitar) further perfects his brand of baroque metal. Although older fans were beginning to protest that the band was becoming a sellout, this album retains the harsh edge of earlier albums while refining a more artistic vision for the band. Experimentation fits in flawlessly with the new sound: synthesized strings on "Embers Fire," angry coliseum crowds on "Colossal Rains," timpani and piano in "Deus Misereatur," and angelic female vocals in "Christendom." It would be difficult to overstate the mastery and genius behind Mackintosh's guitar work and arrangements. The album's scope is majestic and the end result is nothing short of glorious. Listeners who prefer the heavier elements of these songs should move backward in the band's canon, preferably to Gothic; those who are thoroughly satisfied with the sound may enjoy Draconian Times even more. © Christopher Anderson /TiVo
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Metal - Released March 16, 2018 | Paradise Lost

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Metal - Released July 14, 2017 | Music For Nations

Anyone listening to this album for the first time would be forgiven for doing a double-take and checking the cover art to make sure they had indeed purchased Paradise Lost's One Second instead of a Depeche Mode record. This 1997 release displays an astounding sonic evolution when compared to the group's previous release, 1995's Draconian Times, and nothing remains of their early death/doom metal origins. Singer Nick Holmes has permanently retired his once-trademark growl, and the guitars, though still dominant, make room for ambient keyboard melodies as well as the occasional drum machine. "Say Just Words" alternates hypnotic guitar-chugging with a memorable chorus, while "Soul Courageous" would fit in perfectly on any Sisters of Mercy record. "Blood of Another" and "Mercy" are other bright spots, and though fans of early Paradise Lost should approach with caution, there's no denying the quality of this radical but impressive departure. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Metal - Released July 13, 2007 | Century Media

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Rock - Released September 1, 2017 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released July 13, 2004 | Century Media

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Pop - Released November 20, 2015 | Century Media

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Rock - Released June 29, 2018 | Paradise Lost

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Metal - Released July 13, 2009 | Century Media

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Pop/Rock - Released July 1, 1995 | Sony BMG Music Entertainment

Paradise Lost's Draconian Times falls between stark, oppressive goth rock and crunching heavy metal. It's a bit more experimental than their earlier efforts, as it displays subtle industrial influences -- there's the occasional barrage of samples -- as well as more keyboards and a chorus, perhaps appropriately dubbed the "Dead Boys Choir." Draconian Times is intentionally unwelcoming music, but those who want to dwell deep inside its twisted corridors will find a few pleasures. Paradise Lost may not be terrific songwriters, but they can create and sustain a mood. © Daevid Jehnzen /TiVo
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Metal - Released April 18, 2006 | Peaceville Records

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Pop - Released July 13, 2012 | Century Media

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Metal - Released July 14, 1997 | Music For Nations

Anyone listening to this album for the first time would be forgiven for doing a double-take and checking the cover art to make sure they had indeed purchased Paradise Lost's One Second instead of a Depeche Mode record. This 1997 release displays an astounding sonic evolution when compared to the group's previous release, 1995's Draconian Times, and nothing remains of their early death/doom metal origins. Singer Nick Holmes has permanently retired his once-trademark growl, and the guitars, though still dominant, make room for ambient keyboard melodies as well as the occasional drum machine. "Say Just Words" alternates hypnotic guitar-chugging with a memorable chorus, while "Soul Courageous" would fit in perfectly on any Sisters of Mercy record. "Blood of Another" and "Mercy" are other bright spots, and though fans of early Paradise Lost should approach with caution, there's no denying the quality of this radical but impressive departure. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 29, 2019 | M.i.G - music

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Rock - Released February 13, 1997 | Sony BMG Music Entertainment

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Pop/Rock - Released June 1, 2006 | Music For Nations

1992's Shades of God is a transition album for British doom metal legends Paradise Lost. Though the band continues to rely on ominous post-Sabbath guitar riffing for most of the album, lead guitarist Gregor Mackintosh begins to integrate clean melodies and quieter passages into the songs, while vocalist Nick Holmes takes his first cautious stabs at actual singing instead of grunting. "Mortals Watch the Day" and "Your Hand in Mine" are the most effective examples of this and serve as a blueprint for the songs on their following album and commercial breakthrough, Icon. "As I Die" provides the proper send-off for the band's death/doom past, and is undoubtedly the album's strongest cut. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo