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Rock - Released November 25, 2019 | Virgin Music UK LAS (P&D)

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Rock - Released September 16, 2016 | Kscope

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Rock - Released August 18, 2014 | Kscope

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Rock - Released September 18, 2020 | Hidden Art Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 27, 1994 | One Little Independent Records

Things were better honed for No-Man on Flowermouth, released a year after the band's debut. Minus Ben Coleman (although you'd never guess because he appears on seven of nine tracks), Tim Bowness and Steven Wilson were aided by Robert Fripp, Ian Carr, Steve Jansen, and Richard Barbieri (who recorded the excellent set Flame with Bowness in the same year). Beginning with the epic "Angel Gets Caught in the Beauty Trap," which is almost ten minutes on the original and longer on the reissue, things flow as Bowness' soothing vocal gives way to solos by Carr and Fripp. "You Grow More Beautiful" is another hit that might have been, while "Animal Ghost" is what Arthur Ransom, the author of Swallows and Amazons, might have sounded like had he chosen music instead of literature -- a very English affair with a meandering piano line (removed on the reissue) and flute solo. "Soft Shoulders" is the closest to a throwaway, but "Shell of a Fighter" restores order, an enthralling piece expanding to nearly eight minutes of lilting pastoral verse, quiet passages of electronics, and an all out storm of squally guitars and ferrocious drumming. "Teardrop Falls," one of their best, is a paced yet graceful pop dance tune. Flowermouth has serenity, too, in "Watching Over Me," which may have been better following "Shell." "Simple" uses a sample courtesy of Lisa Gerrard of Dead Can Dance, roaming through contemporary club beats to reach a haunting climax. "Things Change" is the endgame, with the lyrics "You're leaving me behind you, I hate the way things change" sung in earnest. Gentle again, giving way to Wilson's emotionally wrought guitar mimicking the gut wrenching agony of love lost. A masterpiece of writing and playing recommended beyond reason. © Kelvin Hayes /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 15, 2014 | Kscope

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Rock - Released September 16, 2016 | Kscope

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 10, 2002 | Hidden Art Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 13, 2009 | Hidden Art Recordings

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Dance - Released September 2, 2016 | Sähkö Recordings

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Rock - Released September 18, 2020 | Hidden Art Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 2, 2012 | Burning Shed

The return of No-Man as a performing act, however irregularly, is a welcome thing, and if Love and Endings is Tim Bowness and Steven Wilson's second live album in just a few years, counting the similar DVD/CD release Mixtaped -- and without any full new studio release in the interim -- it's still a lovely souvenir of a still underrated duo. Beginning with a version of "My Revenge on Seattle," which starts with just the pair's guitar and vocals, they present a now near-trademark, shimmering, beautiful melancholy with the rest of the band slowly drawing in behind them. Love and Endings is one lovely moment after another, the work of performers who clearly value their professional abilities but who never succumb to the dull sterility of excessive polish. If anything, the band might be as close to Porcupine Tree as it's ever been in terms of sound -- not that Wilson has suddenly changed the dynamic of this partnership, but there's a full-bodied power that recurs throughout the album, up through a big rock-out ending to the concluding song "Things Change." "All the Blue Changes" is initially in a calmer spot, with a notable piano and the guitar a bit of focused beauty, but then Wilson's solo begins fanning out into a huge electric sweep and swirl as the band locks in behind him. In slight contrast, "Lighthouse" shows another example of focused delicacy in the arrangements, yet Bowness' voice is, in ways, a secondary factor here given the intricacies of the band, it's almost as if it's more of a Wilson project for the first time. Add in other fine moments, like the cool funk of "Pretty Genius" and the striking version of "Wherever There Is Light," and it's another strong effort from an endlessly fascinating act. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 3, 2013 | One Little Indian Records

Taking all the many strengths of Lovesighs and never looking back, Loveblows is a stunner, utterly out of time and place in 1993 and all the better for it. As the culmination of the original three-person partnership with Coleman and as a formal album debut both, it's simply wondrous, a collision of hip-hop rhythms, delicate art rock, and more into something all its own. There are two absolute standouts that should be heard by just about everybody if at all possible, the first being "Sweetheart Raw." One of the many partnerships the No-Man and Japan family trees would form over time, it features all core Japan members minus David Sylvian -- bassist Mick Karn, drummer Steve Jansen, and keyboardist Richard Barbieri, the latter soon to join Wilson full time in Porcupine Tree. Karn's instantly recognizable fretless work and Wilson's sometimes stinging, sometimes heartbreakingly beautiful guitars set the tone, Bowness delivers a portrait of a ruined life with astonishing empathy, and the result simply amazes. The second is "Heaven's Break," the final tune and one of Bowness' own favorite songs, his vocals flying up to the sky as Coleman and Wilson create a combination of strings, guitar and synth -- but no beats -- to die for. Plenty of other treasures can be found throughout, starting with Coleman's violin piece "Loveblow," accompanied by Richard Felix's moody cello and Wilson's equally so production, and the immediately following "Only Baby," a lush, modern disco/techno classic in the making that slams into life and doesn't stop. When Wilson adds piano and strings to the chorus behind Bowness' soaring vocal, it's note-perfect inspiration. "Tulip" is another winner, a great lyric about needing the just right someone in an equally ugly and lovely world. Quite why something so at once creative and exploratory and on the other hand perfectly, engagingly modern pop never truly hit big will simply have to be one of the great mysteries of music. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 15, 2002 | Hidden Art Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 1, 1993 | One Little Independent Records

Taking all the many strengths of Lovesighs and never looking back, Loveblows is a stunner, utterly out of time and place in 1993 and all the better for it. As the culmination of the original three-person partnership with Coleman and as a formal album debut both, it's simply wondrous, a collision of hip-hop rhythms, delicate art rock, and more into something all its own. There are two absolute standouts that should be heard by just about everybody if at all possible, the first being "Sweetheart Raw." One of the many partnerships the No-Man and Japan family trees would form over time, it features all core Japan members minus David Sylvian -- bassist Mick Karn, drummer Steve Jansen, and keyboardist Richard Barbieri, the latter soon to join Wilson full time in Porcupine Tree. Karn's instantly recognizable fretless work and Wilson's sometimes stinging, sometimes heartbreakingly beautiful guitars set the tone, Bowness delivers a portrait of a ruined life with astonishing empathy, and the result simply amazes. The second is "Heaven's Break," the final tune and one of Bowness' own favorite songs, his vocals flying up to the sky as Coleman and Wilson create a combination of strings, guitar and synth -- but no beats -- to die for. Plenty of other treasures can be found throughout, starting with Coleman's violin piece "Loveblow," accompanied by Richard Felix's moody cello and Wilson's equally so production, and the immediately following "Only Baby," a lush, modern disco/techno classic in the making that slams into life and doesn't stop. When Wilson adds piano and strings to the chorus behind Bowness' soaring vocal, it's note-perfect inspiration. "Tulip" is another winner, a great lyric about needing the just right someone in an equally ugly and lovely world. Quite why something so at once creative and exploratory and on the other hand perfectly, engagingly modern pop never truly hit big will simply have to be one of the great mysteries of music. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 22, 2019 | Virgin Music UK LAS (P&D)

The seventh album from the British prog/art rock duo comes a full 11 years after its predecessor, 2008's Schoolyard Ghosts. Returning to the synth pop style with which they originally made their name, the album consists of two five-part song cycles which chronicle the aftermath of a relationship breakdown from different perspectives with a unique musical fusion variously reminiscent of David Bowie, Brian Eno, Pet Shop Boys, and the Orb. © John D. Buchanan /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 1, 1992 | One Little Independent Records

Not an album but a brief collection of early singles and cuts for One Little Indian, Lovesighs is a wonderful introduction to the group as a whole, not to mention a near-perfect official start for the band in and of itself. The blend of Tim Bowness' breathy, passionate singing, Steve Wilson's ear for funk loops and dance beats, and Coleman's elegant violin playing immediately set the band apart from the rampant 1990 baggy scene into its own shimmering, sharp world. The two absolute killer tracks are "Colours" (a remake of the Donovan standard with a big beat, this is a fine Coleman solo with quietly emotional vocals from Bowness) and the simply wondrous "Days in the Trees." Appearing in two different versions, both are utter keepers. The "Mahler" take features Bowness' sweeping singing over a slamming breakbeat and background strings, which Coleman adds to just right with his own upfront contribution. When Wilson fully adds some astonishing, sparkling guitar toward the end, it's pure aural heaven. The "Reich" take, meanwhile, samples dialogue from an episode of Twin Peaks, with Lara Flynn Boyle's character talking about going out with some older boys. Combined with Wilson's gentle, minimal arrangement of keyboard loops and synth strings, it makes for a haunting yet pretty fusion. Two different takes of the equally fine "Heartcheat Pop" also appear, the second being the halfway-to-instrumental "Heartcheat Motel." Other tracks of note include "Kiss Me Stupid," with a playful looped start and moody chimes and notes floating amid the crisp beats and Bowness' always-exquisite vocals; and "Iris Murdoch Cut Me Up," starting with a dramatic, threatening air and continuing it even when the drums and funk guitar kick in. Only "Drink Judas" is comparatively less thrilling than the rest, and even that's a fine example of what the band can do. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 18, 2020 | Hidden Art Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 2, 2009 | Hidden Art Recordings

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Rock - Released September 18, 2020 | Hidden Art Recordings