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Alternative & Indie - Released November 13, 1981 | Rhino

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Ian Curtis had only been buried for one year before the surviving members of Joy Division returned to the studio, dried their tears and attempted making music again. Out of the still reddened ashes of the most emblematic post-punk group, New Order was born. A newcomer Gillian Gilbert was on keys. The guitarist Bernard Sumner donned the captain’s armband. And Martin Hannett, Joy Division’s producer, was again behind the controls. Recorded between the 24th of April and 4th of May 1981 and released on the 11th of November of the same year on Factory Records, the band’s first album is an impeccable transition of which time makes it only more impressive. The rigidity and coldness of Joy Division’s anthracite rock remains at the heart of the compositions. Sharp rhythms and clear guitars with depressive, sickly groans like a zombie on its last legs, Movement contains, however, beginnings of a sound atypical from the young Mancunians that never smile. We are still far from the electronic new wave and dance that New Order demonstrate on their subsequent album, but the role of keys and synths here shows beginnings of a new path for the band. This 2019 Definitive edition offers, in addition to a stellar remastering, 18 demos and alternative mixes. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released May 7, 2021 | Rhino

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For fifteen years now New Order has had to make do without a bassist, and without their co-founder Peter Hook, who stormed out in 2006. The new line-up, led by Bernard Sumner with Stephen Morris, Gillian Gilbert, Phil Cunningham and Tom Chapman, is clearly doing no worse, as we can tell from this new live record (their fifth in ten years) made in November 2018 in London's Alexandra Palace. The concert opens with Wagner, before raining down blow after blow on Singularity, which is one of four tracks on the setlist to be taken from the 2015 album Music Complete (the first album they made without Peter Hook). And while the record didn't win around the critics, this track makes masterful use of the old Joy Division DNA. The ghost of Ian Curtis looms over this 140-minute performance, with searing mementoes in the form of Atmosphere, Decades and Love Will Tear Us Apart which closes the set. Along the way, we get all the hits: from Blue Monday to Bizarre Love Triangle and The Perfect Kiss, all in a venue brought to the boil by an ecstatic, nostalgic audience. It's enough to cheer up even the bluest Monday. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Pop - Released September 30, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

Now that Waiting for the Sirens' Call has been officially declared part of New Order's history, only eight months after release, it's time once again to reassess the group in the form of a mostly redundant compilation. Rhino calls Singles the group's "first ever career-spanning two-disc retrospective," but it's more like the group's first compilation to contain tracks from Sirens' Call. Besides, 1987's Substance spanned the group's career upon release and remains the basis for most New Order compilations (this one included), so it's no big deal. Just as importantly, over a third of the contents date from 1993 onward; that's too high a percentage to make the set an ideal introduction. Considering its title, Singles has a clear-cut purpose, unlike 2002's International. Then again, each of the 14 tracks contained on International are also here -- what amounts to an inferior version of Substance with some crucial tracks squeezed out in favor of lesser, later singles. A proper sequel to Substance, covering Technique through Sirens' Call, would've made more sense, but the lure in dressing up a combination of oft-recycled classics with slightly varying surroundings has yet to lose its appeal. Substance remains, and will likely always remain, the release to get you started. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 16, 1999 | WM UK

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In his 2016 autobiography Substance: Inside New Order, Peter Hook writes: “I’ve often said that the magic of New Order was all that push-and-pull between the rock and electronic sides of the music, the yin and yang of Barney [Sumner] and me.” Power, Corruption & Lies, New Order’s second studio album released in May 1983, confirms this comment and features an even more electronic sound. With its famous cover art that depicts a reworking by graphic designer Peter Saville of 19th century French painter Henri Fantin-Latour’s Un panier de roses (A basket of roses), the record alternates between innovative electro-pop (5-6-8) and synthetic cold wave (Your Silent Face), but also more classic post-punk (Age of Consent). What’s more, Sumner’s vocals are his own and the influence of Ian Curtis is a distant memory. With Power, Corruption & Lies, New Order fused the influences of Kraftwerk and Giorgio Moroder to give birth to their own unstoppable compositions, cornerstones for the British electronic pop of that era. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Released August 17, 1987 | Rhino

Born out of the ashes of Joy Division in the early 1980s, New Order symbolises one of the first truly successful unions between rock’n’roll and dance music. The darkest Mancunian band of the punk era who had transformed into masters of the dancefloor signed the perfect soundtrack to the gloomy England under Thatcher. Released in the summer of 1987 on the label Factory, Substance brings together all their various styles and singles like the hits Blue Monday, Ceremony, Confusion, The Perfect Kiss or Bizarre Love Triangle. This was obviously the golden age for the quartet made up of Bernard Sumner, Peter Hook, Gillian Gilbert and Stephen Morris. Despite a few highlights (such as the album Technique in 1989), New Order never really reached this level of composition again... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Released November 12, 1999 | WM UK

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Pop - Released January 14, 2000 | WM UK

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Pop - Released May 2, 1983 | WM UK

In his 2016 autobiography Substance: Inside New Order, Peter Hook writes: “I’ve often said that the magic of New Order was all that push-and-pull between the rock and electronic sides of the music, the yin and yang of Barney [Sumner] and me.” Power, Corruption & Lies, New Order’s second studio album released in May 1983, confirms this comment and features an even more electronic sound. With its famous cover art that depicts a reworking by graphic designer Peter Saville of 19th century French painter Henri Fantin-Latour’s Un panier de roses (A basket of roses), the record alternates between innovative electro-pop (5-6-8) and synthetic cold wave (Your Silent Face), but also more classic post-punk (Age of Consent). What’s more, Sumner’s vocals are his own and the influence of Ian Curtis is a distant memory. With Power, Corruption & Lies, New Order fused the influences of Kraftwerk and Giorgio Moroder to give birth to their own unstoppable compositions, cornerstones for the British electronic pop of that era. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Released January 1, 1994 | London Records

New Order's first compilation album, Substance (1987), finally broke the group through to commercial success in the U.S. Its second one, The Best of New Order, isn't exactly Substance II. The previous set was a singles collection, and Best Of does pick up that story, including a series of songs -- "True Faith" (in a new remix), "Touched by the Hand of God," "Blue Monday 88," "Fine Time," "Round & Round" (in a new remix), "Run," and "World in Motion" -- that were bigger hits in the U.K. than in the U.S. (Also included is the group's biggest U.S. hit, "Regret" as well as its charting follow-up, "World [The Price of Love].") But in addition, the compilers have included one song each from the group's albums -- "Dreams Never End" from Movement, "Age of Consent" from Power, Corruption & Lies, "Love Vigilantes" from Low-Life, "Vanishing Point" from Technique, and "Ruined in a Day" from Republic. Add in some rarities, plus "Bizarre Love Triangle," repeated from Brotherhood and Substance, and you have 17 tracks taking up 70 and a half minutes and providing a good survey of New Order, 1981-1993. Substance, with its concentration on the group's run of classic singles from the early '80s, is a more consistent effort, but The Best of New Order, even if it is misnamed, is an excellent sampler of one of the major British bands of the 1980s. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 14, 2000 | WM UK

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Pop - Released April 27, 1993 | WM UK

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Pop - Released January 20, 1989 | Rhino

Tastes and sounds were changing quickly in the late '80s, which prompted New Order's most startling transformation yet -- from moody dance-rockers to, well, moody acid-house mavens. After the band booked a studio on the island hotspot of Ibiza, apparently not knowing that it was the center of the burgeoning house music craze, New Order's sure instincts for blending rock and contemporary dance resulted in another confident, superb LP. Technique was the group's most striking production job, with the single "Fine Time" proving a close runner-up to "Blue Monday" as the most extroverted dance track in the band's catalog. Opening the record, it was a portrait of a group unrecognizable from its origins, delivering lascivious and extroverted come-ons amid pounding beats. It appeared that dance had fully taken over from rock, with the guitars and bass only brought in for a quick solo or bridge. But while pure dance was the case for the singles "Fine Time" and "Round & Round," elsewhere New Order were still delivering some of the best alternative pop around, plaintive and affecting songs like "Run" (the third single), "Love Less," and "Dream Attack." Placed in the perfect position to deliver the definitive alternative take on house music, the band produced another classic record. © John Bush /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 16, 2001 | London Records

Instead of settling down in front of the mixing board for another dance album (a lá Technique or Republic), New Order returned in 2001 with a sound and style they hadn't played with for over a decade. Unsurprisingly bored by the stale British club scene circa 2001, the band opened Get Ready with a statement of purpose, a trailer single ("Crystal") featuring a host of longtime New Order staples: a sublime melody, an inscrutable set of lyrics, a deft, ragged guitar line kicking in for the chorus, and Peter Hook's yearning bass guitar taking a near-solo role. Though there are several allowances for the electronic-dance form New Order helped develop, Get Ready is a very straight-ahead album, their first work in 15 years that's focused on songwriting and performance rather than grafted dance techniques. (Of course, the band proved themselves far more than studio hands at several points, stretching back over twenty years to Joy Division's landmark Unknown Pleasures, as well as later New Order LPs like 1985's Low-life and 1986's Brotherhood.) Listeners familiar with the blueprint of early New Order work will find much to love on Get Ready, from the tough rockers "60 Miles an Hour" and "Primitive Notion" to pastoral downtempo material like "Turn My Way," "Vicious Streak," and the melodica-driven closer "Run Wild." This naked songcraft, however, does reveal a few of the band's deficiencies. Bernard Summer's lyrics drift toward the inane: "I'll be there for you when you want me to/I'll stand by your side like I always do/In the dead of night it'll be alright/cuz I'll be there for you when you want me to." And the band can't help but identify with a younger generation of music-makers, inviting Primal Scream's Bobby Gillespie over for "Rock the Shack" and turning in a dense, chaotic production that's all but de rigeur for Gillespie but very strained for New Order. (The other main collaborative track, with stranded Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan, is surprisingly unembarassing.) Even for fans who don't need any convincing, Get Ready is a true "grower," an album that reveal its delicious secrets -- sublime songcraft, introverted delivery, collaborative musicianship -- slowly and only after several listens. © John Bush /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 8, 2020 | Mute

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 12, 2019 | Mute

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In 1978, Joy Division made their first TV appearance in the former Manchester Granada studios on Tony Wilson’s show, So It Goes. In the summer of 2017, New Order (aka Joy Division Mark II) returned to the scene of the crime for 5 concerts, with ∑(No,12k,Lg,17Mif) New Order + Liam Gillick: So It Goes… being their 13th July performance. Despite not being particularly renowned for their on-stage performances, they still continue to regularly release live albums. After BBC Radio 1 Live in Concert in 1992, Live at the London Troxy in 2011, Live at Bestival 2012 in 2013 and NOMC15 in 2017, Bernard Sumner’s band conceived this show with artist Liam Gillick, who is normally better suited to the Tate Modern than to concert halls. Some tracks have even been reworked with the help of composer Joe Duddell and a 12-strong synthesizer ensemble.But one thing that fans will be particularly pleased by is the set list. Songs now seldom performed by the Mancunian group (such as Times Change from Republic, Vanishing Point from Technique, Ultraviolence from Power, Corruption and Lies and Plastic from Music Complete) as well as four Joy Division tracks (In a Lonely Place, Decades, Heart & Soul and Disorder, songs which haven’t been played live in 30 years!) make for a very special record. Without resting on their laurels, the quintet consisting of the original line-up (Bernard Sumner, Stephen Morris and Gillian Gilbert) along with later additions (Phil Cunningham and Tom Chapman) perform completely reworked versions of their hits from the last century, proving that they most certainly still have things left to say. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Rock - Released June 6, 2011 | WM UK

Total: From Joy Division to New Order, issued by Rhino U.K. in 2011, is an unavoidably awkward attempt at distilling the output of two connected bands to a single disc. Should you happen to want the biggest hits and an assortment of highlights, this might do the trick: “Love Will Tear Us Apart,” “Blue Monday,” and “Bizarre Love Triangle” are all included. Both Joy Division and New Order released crucial studio albums and were the subjects of landmark singles compilations. This release drastically shortchanges their legacies. There is no point to the disc's existence, unless you factor the one previously unreleased outtake -- a weak one at that -- recorded by New Order in 2005. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 1, 1985 | Rhino

In his 2016 autobiography Substance: Inside New Order, Peter Hook writes: “I’ve often said that the magic of New Order was all that push-and-pull between the rock and electronic sides of the music, the yin and yang of Barney [Sumner] and me.” Power, Corruption & Lies, New Order’s second studio album released in May 1983, confirms this comment and features an even more electronic sound. With its famous cover art that depicts a reworking by graphic designer Peter Saville of 19th century French painter Henri Fantin-Latour’s Un panier de roses (A basket of roses), the record alternates between innovative electro-pop (5-6-8) and synthetic cold wave (Your Silent Face), but also more classic post-punk (Age of Consent). What’s more, Sumner’s vocals are his own and the influence of Ian Curtis is a distant memory. With Power, Corruption & Lies, New Order fused the influences of Kraftwerk and Giorgio Moroder to give birth to their own unstoppable compositions, cornerstones for the British electronic pop of that era. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 25, 2015 | Mute

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For Music Complete, New Order's ninth album and first in a decade, the band signed to new label Mute and welcomed keyboardist Gillian Gilbert back for her first recordings with them since 2001. Unfortunately, original bassist Peter Hook, who quit in 2007, didn't return and his bass duties were taken over by Tom Chapman, who played with Bernard Sumner in Bad Lieutenant. The return of Gilbert is a clue that the band is looking to the past for inspiration here and forsaking the guitar-driven rock orientation of its last couple albums for something more balanced, if not tipped in favour of more electronic and dancefloor-oriented songs. To that end, they brought in Chemical Brother Tom Rowlands as well as Richard X and Stuart Price to produce tracks. Not the most daring or forward-looking choices for collaborators, but their efforts result in some of the album's highlights. Rowlands invests "Singularity" with some Chemical Brothers-style punch, while "Unlearn This Hatred" has a passionate, almost industrial drive. © CM/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 8, 2020 | Mute

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Pop - Released March 7, 1983 | WM UK