Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES€19.49
CD€16.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 24, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
All the greats have dabbled in such projects. Bowie with Pinups, Johnny Cash with American IV: The Man Comes Around, Lennon with Rock & Roll, Metallica with Garage Inc, Cat Power with The Covers Record, Meshell Ndegeocello with Ventriloquism, Patti Smith with Twelve, Costello with Almost Blue and hundreds more. Nevertheless, the cover album remains a risky project that rarely stands out in an artist’s discography. With California Son, Morrissey works namely to unearth unexpected, obscured or even forgotten songs. The ex-Smiths singer’s favourite artists (New York Dolls, Patti Smith, Roxy Music, Bowie, Sparks etc.) are known to many yet are nowhere to be found on this album. With the help of seven collaborators (LP, Ed Droste of Grizzly Bear, Ariel Engle of Broken Social Scene, Petra Haden, Sameer Gadhia of Young the Giant, Billie Joe Armstrong of Green Day and Lydia Night of the Regrettes), Moz excels particularly on tracks by Roy Orbison, Melanie, Laura Nyro, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Bob Dylan, the 5th Dimension but also Jobriath, Phil Ochs, Tim Hardin, Joni Mitchell and Carly Simon. His voice acts as a driving force and is often exquisite, mastering each title (it’s astonishing on Dylan’s Only a Pawn in their Game). Above all, it’s a record we recommend to all Morrissey fans. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
CD€14.99

Rock - Released March 30, 2012 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Following the breakup of the Smiths, Morrissey needed to prove that he was a viable artist without Johnny Marr, and Viva Hate fulfilled that goal with grace. Working with producer Stephen Street and guitarist Vini Reilly (of the Durutti Column), Morrissey doesn't drastically depart from the sound of Strangeways, Here We Come, offering a selection of 12 jangling guitar pop sounds. One major concession is the presence of synthesizers -- which is ironic, considering the Smiths' adamant opposition to keyboards -- but neither the sound, nor Morrissey's wit, is diluted. And while the music is occasionally pedestrian, Morrissey compensates with a superb batch of lyrics, ranging from his conventional despair ("Little Man, What Now?," "I Don't Mind If You Forget Me") to the savage political tirade of "Margaret on a Guillotine." Nevertheless, the two masterstrokes on the album -- the gorgeous "Everyday Is Like Sunday" and the infectious "Suedehead" -- were previously singles, and both are on the compilation Bona Drag. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD€16.99

Rock - Released June 2, 2014 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
While it isn't a gutsy rock & roll record like Your Arsenal, Vauxhall and I is equally impressive. Filled with carefully constructed guitar pop gems, the album contains some of Morrissey's best material since the Smiths. Out of all of his solo albums, Vauxhall and I sounds the most like his former band, yet the textured, ringing guitar on this record is an extension of his past, not a replication of it. In fact, with songs like "Now My Heart Is Full" and "Hold on to Your Friends," Morrissey sounds more comfortable and peaceful than he ever has. And "The More You Ignore Me, the Closer I Get," "Speedway," and "Spring-Heeled Jim" prove that he hasn't lost his vicious wit. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
HI-RES€19.49
CD€16.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 20, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Hi-Res
After the superb side project California Son, which he entirely dedicated to unexpected and occasionally obscure covers (Roy Orbison, Melanie, Laura Nyro, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Dylan, 5th Dimension, Jobriath, Phil Ochs, Tim Hardin, Joni Mitchell, Carly Simon), Morrissey returns to his own compositions. This time, the ex-Smiths vocalist (who is also known for his vocal points of view that often get written about in the tabloids) delivers an eclectic array of songs that is distinctly less rock’n’roll on the whole. This time, the sound is rather pop, often groovy but never overly seductive, the climax being the single Bobby, Don’t You Think They Know? sung in a duet with disco soul powerhouse Thelma Houston. Some tracks even sound rather like The Smiths… Lyrically, Moz unsurprisingly remains anti-everything: media, establishment, open-mindedness, consumerism. As for his Marmite crooner’s voice, it excels in the final track My Hurling Days Are Done, punctuating a rather interesting thirteenth album. ©️ Marc Zisman/Qobuz
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released November 17, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Hi-Res
In the middle of summer 2014 Morrissey reassured us all with World Peace Is None Of Your Business that his inspiration had been refreshed like never before. Three years later, with Low In High School, the former singer of The Smiths has changed his tune with an 11th solo album that’s rather puzzling. Puzzling even by his standards. But the eclecticism of the production, going from a total powerhouse of sounds to almost acoustic refrains, mustn’t mask the power of several of the songs. As usual, Moz is impeccable in his role as a misanthropic pamphleteer and, judging by the cover, we understand that the British dandy is not here to swallow his pride. A pride that he always likes to counteract with a good dose of ambiguity, this art in which he remains a real expert. But when he’s doing Morrissey, like on Home Is a Question Mark or I Bury The Living, once he puts on his quirky crooner habits on a sharpened prose, he is unique… Album after album, Morrissey reminds us that The Smiths saga is buried firmly underground and that he’s dancing on the headstone. © MD/Qobuz
CD€16.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 24, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

All the greats have dabbled in such projects. Bowie with Pinups, Johnny Cash with American IV: The Man Comes Around, Lennon with Rock & Roll, Metallica with Garage Inc, Cat Power with The Covers Record, Meshell Ndegeocello with Ventriloquism, Patti Smith with Twelve, Costello with Almost Blue and hundreds more. Nevertheless, the cover album remains a risky project that rarely stands out in an artist’s discography. With California Son, Morrissey works namely to unearth unexpected, obscured or even forgotten songs. The ex-Smiths singer’s favourite artists (New York Dolls, Patti Smith, Roxy Music, Bowie, Sparks etc.) are known to many yet are nowhere to be found on this album. With the help of seven collaborators (LP, Ed Droste of Grizzly Bear, Ariel Engle of Broken Social Scene, Petra Haden, Sameer Gadhia of Young the Giant, Billie Joe Armstrong of Green Day and Lydia Night of the Regrettes), Moz excels particularly on tracks by Roy Orbison, Melanie, Laura Nyro, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Bob Dylan, the 5th Dimension but also Jobriath, Phil Ochs, Tim Hardin, Joni Mitchell and Carly Simon. His voice acts as a driving force and is often exquisite, mastering each title (it’s astonishing on Dylan’s Only a Pawn in their Game). Above all, it’s a record we recommend to all Morrissey fans. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released November 17, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

In the middle of summer 2014 Morrissey reassured us all with World Peace Is None Of Your Business that his inspiration had been refreshed like never before. Three years later, with Low In High School, the former singer of The Smiths has changed his tune with an 11th solo album that’s rather puzzling. Puzzling even by his standards. But the eclecticism of the production, going from a total powerhouse of sounds to almost acoustic refrains, mustn’t mask the power of several of the songs. As usual, Moz is impeccable in his role as a misanthropic pamphleteer and, judging by the cover, we understand that the British dandy is not here to swallow his pride. A pride that he always likes to counteract with a good dose of ambiguity, this art in which he remains a real expert. But when he’s doing Morrissey, like on Home Is a Question Mark or I Bury The Living, once he puts on his quirky crooner habits on a sharpened prose, he is unique… Album after album, Morrissey reminds us that The Smiths saga is buried firmly underground and that he’s dancing on the headstone. © MD/Qobuz
CD€9.99

Rock - Released September 8, 1997 | Parlophone UK

Morrissey has always favored compilations, releasing such hodgepodges of singles, B-sides, and album tracks as Bona Drag and World of Morrissey, but the 19-track The Best of Morrissey: Suedehead is the first official "hits" collection he has released in his solo career. Spanning his years at EMI -- from 1988's Viva Hate to 1994's Vauxhall and I, with the 1995 single "Sunny" added as a bonus -- Suedehead is an imperfect collection, especially since it's sequenced out of chronological order, but it's pretty great all the same, featuring a basic selection of singles such as "Suedehead," "Everyday Is Like Sunday," "Tomorrow," "Interesting Drug," "Our Frank," "Piccadilly Palare," "We Hate It When Our Friends Become Successful," "The Last of the Famous International Playboys," "Boxers," and "The More You Ignore Me, the Closer I Get." There's also a handful of rarities, such as the extended version of "Interlude" and his cover of the Jam's "That's Entertainment," but at its core, this disc is a solid collection that may convince skeptics that Morrissey's solo records did indeed have a lot to offer. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 3, 2004 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

At his core, Morrissey has always been conservative -- not necessarily in his politics but in how he romanticizes the past and plays by the rules of a different time. His passions, whether it's the New York Dolls or '60s British cinema, exist out of time, and he's gone to great lengths to ensure that his music also can't be pinned to a particular era, which means all his solo albums share similar musical and theatrical traits, and they're subject to the whims of fashion. In the years following the Smiths, he could rarely set a foot wrong, but sometime after releasing his best solo album, Your Arsenal, in 1992, the British music press turned on him and he was not much better than a pariah during the mid-'90s heyday of Brit-pop, the very time that he should have been celebrated as one of the great figures of British pop music, particularly since the Smiths inspired every band of note, from Suede and Blur to Oasis and Pulp. By the time he released Maladjusted in the summer of 1997, he was a forgotten legend, not even given approval of his album art, and instead of cranking out records to the diehards, he chose to move to Los Angeles and wait out the storm. He stayed quiet for seven years. During that time, fashions changed again, as they're prone to do, as Brit-pop turned toward the sullen art rock of Radiohead and Coldplay, the mainstream filled up with teen pop, and American rock music was either stuck in the death throes of grunge and punk-pop or in emo's heart-on-sleeve caterwauling, which owed no little debt to Mozzer's grandly theatric introspection in the Smiths. Instead of being seen as a has-been, as he had been in the latter half of the '90s, Morrissey was seen as a giant, name checked by artists as diverse as Ryan Adams and OutKast, so the time was ripe for a comeback. But Morrissey had waited long enough to do it on his terms, rejecting major labels for Sanctuary (on the condition that they revive the reggae imprint Attack Records) and recording You Are the Quarry with his longtime touring band, with producer Jerry Finn, best-known for his work with neo-punk bands blink-182, Sum 41, and Green Day. Finn's presence suggests that Morrissey might be changing or modernizing his sound, designing a large-scale comeback, but that runs contrary to his character. Apart from some subtleties -- the glam on Your Arsenal, the gentleness on Vauxhall and I, the prog rock on Southpaw Grammar -- he's worked the same territory ever since Viva Hate, and there's no reason for him to change now. And he doesn't. There are no surprises on You Are the Quarry. It delivers all the trademark wit, pathos, and surging mid-tempo guitar anthems that have been his stock-in-trade since the beginning of his solo career. It's not so much a return to form as it is a simple return, Morrissey picking up where he left off with Maladjusted, improving on that likeable album with a stronger set of songs and more muscular music (even if no single is as indelible as "Alma Matters"). If You Are the Quarry had been delivered in 1999, it would have been written off as more of the same, but since it's coming out at the end of a seven-year itch, he's back in fashion, so its reception is very warm. Frankly, it's nice to have his reputation restored, but that oversells the album, suggesting that it's either a breakthrough or a comeback when it's neither. It's merely a very good Morrissey album, living up to his legacy without expanding it greatly. But after such a long wait, that's more than enough. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD€11.49

Pop - Released April 22, 2011 | Parlophone UK

CD€16.99

Rock - Released February 5, 2014 | Rhino

Morrissey bounced back from the lackluster Kill Uncle with the terrific Your Arsenal. A dynamic, invigorating fusion of glam rock and rockabilly, Your Arsenal rocks harder than any other record Morrissey ever made. Guitarist Alain Whyte's riffs swagger with a self-absorbed arrogance, and producer Mick Ronson gives the music a tough, stylish sheen -- it may be a break from Morrissey's jangle pop, but the music is sharper than at has been since the Smiths, and so is Morrissey's pen. Running through his trademark litany of emotional, social, and personal observations, Morrissey is viciously clever and occasionally moving. And the songs -- whether it's the rush of "You're Gonna Need Someone on Your Side," the menacing "We'll Let You Know," the spare rockabilly bop of "Certain People I Know," the gospel-tinged "I Know It's Gonna Happen Someday," or "Tomorrow" -- are uniformly excellent, forming the core of Morrissey's finest solo record and his best work since The Queen Is Dead. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released April 3, 2006 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Few comebacks are ever as expertly executed as Morrissey's 2004 return to the stage, You Are the Quarry. It may have not sold gangbusters but it was certainly a hit, proving that he still had legions of devoted fans who would follow through hell and high water (or at the very least, seven years between albums), and earned his best reviews in years, elevating him to the status of well-respected elder statesman. It also gave him the opportunity to return to regular record-making, an opportunity that he seizes with Quarry's quickly delivered sequel, 2006's Ringleader of the Tormentors. Despite its near-genius title, perfect artwork, and pedigree -- instead of working with modern punk producer Jerry Finn as he did last time around, Moz has hired the legendary Tony Visconti, best known for his work with T. Rex and David Bowie, and even has the iconic Ennio Morricone provide orchestration for the epic "Dear God Please Help Me" -- Ringleader of the Tormentors is about as close to standard-issue Morrissey as it gets. There's always been a certain similarity to his work, particularly on his solo recordings, but each of his records either had a distinct sonic or aesthetic point of view or, at the very least, was graced by a handful of songs distinguished by a particularly sharp turn of phrase, whether it was lyrical or musical. It would seem that Ringleader has all the elements of being a cut above an average Morrissey LP, since not only are his collaborators storied themselves, but it's supported by a press campaign where the once celibate, often miserable singer has declared that he's abandoned L.A. for Rome, where he is living happily and living in love. All of these elements seem to be the core ingredients for a classic Morrissey record, but there is little about Ringleader that's distinctive: whether it's the standard-issue single "You Have Killed Me" or the grinding seven-minute art rock centerpiece "Life Is a Pigsty," each tune has an all-too-clear antecedent elsewhere in Moz's catalog. Again, since Morrissey often works within a strict formula, this familiarity isn't necessarily bad, but the songs lack memorable moments. Not to say that there aren't highlights -- the dirgeful opener, "I Will See You in Far Off Places," is dreamily evocative, "In the Future When All Is Well" and "On the Streets I Ran" are nicely propulsive -- but there is nothing noteworthy or fresh here besides Morrissey's new tendency toward blunt words. He writes candidly about his personal life on this record in a way that he never has before -- he implicitly outs himself on "Dear God Please Help Me" -- and while this outburst of frank emotion may add some resonance to his declarations of love and rebirth, his words are clunky, lacking his trademark elegant wit ("I see the world, it makes me puke" and "there are explosive kegs between my legs" are a long way from "Why pamper life's complexity/When the leather runs smooth on the passenger seat?"). That is also true of the very sound of Ringleader of the Tormentors, which is just a shade too slick and sequenced, veering too close to comfort to the overly glossy '80s productions Morrissey routinely denounced during his days with the Smiths. These are subtle flaws, something that only the Morrissey diehard can dig out, but that's pretty much the only kind of fan Morrissey has in 2006. And since these flaws are not enough to derail the record, just enough to annoy, it's easy to enjoy Ringleader of the Tormentors as merely an everyday Morrissey record, but it's hard not to shake the suspicion that this album is the closest he's ever been to forgettable. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD€11.49

Pop - Released September 21, 1992 | Parlophone UK

As he was toiling on Kill Uncle, Morrissey released Bona Drag, a compilation of singles and B-sides, including "Everyday Is Like Sunday" and "Suedehead" from Viva Hate. While the record conveniently overlooks some rarities, the selections on Bona Drag are uniformly first-rate and many of the songs -- "Picadilly Palare," "Interesting Drug," "November Spawned a Monster," "The Last of the Famous International Playboys," "Lucky Lisp," "Disappointed," "He Knows I'd Love to See Him," and "Ouija Board, Ouija Board" -- are Morrissey classics, arguably making Bona Drag a more consistent and entertaining record than Viva Hate. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released February 16, 2009 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

All the heavy lifting of his comeback finished, Morrissey settles into a robust middle age on Years of Refusal, an evocation of his thick Your Arsenal sound that doesn't feel like a conscious re-creation -- rather, this just is who Moz is, an old brawler who refuses to hang up his gloves or settle a grudge. The sound remains the same but the songs don't quite: although this is also produced by Jerry Finn, this isn't the deliberate revival of You Are the Quarry, all sharp edges and metallic sheen, the better to rope in the young emo kids who came of age after Maladjusted, nor is it the gentle prog pretensions of the Tony Visconti-produced Ringleader of the Tormentors. Years of Refusal is comfortable in its settled nature, in its roaring guitars and swaying melodies, sometimes ratcheting up the aggression -- especially so on the tight, compacted opener, "Something Is Squeezing My Skull" -- but often just riding along, assured in its might and wit, never feeling the need to change for change's sake. Such conservatism has long been part of Morrissey's makeup -- when everybody pined for a synthesized future in the Thatcher/Reagan years, he sought refuge in the past -- and now that he has people paying attention again, he's fine with not changing the sound and writing songs about his happy middle-aged miserablism, a miserablism that increasingly feels like a device to fuel Morrissey's satire. Morrissey has never been reluctant to turn his wit upon himself but he relishes sending up his moping persona and advancing age here, resulting in some excellent quips and asides, along with some nicely honed ballads like "You Were Good in Your Time." Along with "That's How People Grow Up," where the perennially broken-hearted Moz acknowledges that there are worse things in life than never being someone's sweetie, this song is the best example of how Morrissey is feeling his years -- contrary to the implications within the album's title, he's not fretting about his age but throwing his arms around it, giving Years of Refusal a nicely comfortable feel that's welcome after the slightly strident overtones of its predecessors. Nothing here is surprising, of course, but Years of Refusal is a full-bodied, full-blooded album that also happens to be fully realized -- even if it is on a rather modest scale. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 29, 2005 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Live at Earls Court finds British rock icon Morrissey and his band performing in London at the end of the You Are the Quarry tour. Not to be confused with the DVD Who Put the "M" in Manchester? recorded at the beginning of the tour in May, Live at Earls Court is a completely different concert from December 2004 and features a vastly different set list. While past live Morrissey albums such as Beethoven Was Deaf featured the singer's penchant for beautifully ragged ersatz rockabilly, Earls Court showcases the more polished group sound developed out of the You Are the Quarry sessions, which isn't to say that Morrissey has lost his edge. On the contrary -- such songs as "I Have Forgiven Jesus" and "The World Is Full of Crashing Bores" prove that his legendary wit and sardonic tongue are fully intact and as sharp as ever. Similarly, his burnished baritone vocals have arguably never sounded better and the lush, muscular band arrangements frame him with a glam regality befitting his late-career resurgence. Although newer songs off You Are the Quarry are the focus, longtime Moz fans will be delighted at the amount of Smiths songs included here. In fact, the mix of the old, the new, and the unexpected -- he also performs some rare B-sides -- makes Live at Earls Court one of the most successful albums of Morrissey's career. © Matt Collar /TiVo
CD€2.29

Alternative & Indie - Released January 10, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

CD€14.99

Rock - Released May 10, 1993 | Parlophone UK

Recorded on the English Your Arsenal tour, the 16-track album Beethoven Was Deaf is an effective argument for Morrissey's capabilities as a live performer. Although none of the songs, which are all drawn from his solo career, are drastically different than their original studio incarnation, they are performed with skill by Morrissey's pseudo-rockabilly band, giving the singer ample opportunity to flaunt his charisma. But it's not just charisma -- Morrissey is a powerful, if unconventional vocalist, capable of squeezing out all the wit and exaggerated emotion from each song. While many of his great solo songs are here ("Suedehead," "Certain People I Know," "Sister I'm a Poet"), it relies a little too heavily on Your Arsenal to be a good career overview, yet it remains a fine souvenir for hardcore fans. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD€7.99

Pop - Released July 6, 2018 | Rhino

An odds-and-sods collection in every meaning of the term, the 2018 set This Is Morrissey is a hodgepodge of hits ("The Last of the Famous International Playboys," "Ouija Board, Ouija Board," "Everyday Is Like Sunday"), deep cuts, B-sides, alternate mixes, and live cuts. While this certainly contains good music -- not just the aforementioned hits but nifty rarities like a live version of Lou Reed's "Satellite of Love" -- it's hard to imagine who this compilation is for, as it's not a good intro to Morrissey for novices and serious Moz-heads will already own this stuff. Still, as a listen, it's pleasant. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD€33.99

Pop - Released October 12, 2009 | Parlophone UK

CD€2.29

Alternative & Indie - Released February 21, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited