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Rock - Released January 1, 1993 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Thanks to the fluke hit "Fade Into You" -- one of the better beneficiaries of alt-rock's radio prominence in the early '90s, a gentle descent of a lead melody accompanied by piano, a steady beat, and above all else, Hope Sandoval's lovely lead vocal -- Mazzy Star's second album became something of a commercial success. All without changing much at all from where the band was before -- David Roback oversaw all the production, the core emphasis remained a nexus point between country, folk, psych, and classic rock all shrouded in mystery, and Sandoval's trademark drowsy drawl remained swathed in echo. But grand as She Hangs Brightly was, So Tonight That I Might See remains the group's undisputed high point, mixing in plenty of variety among its tracks without losing sight of what made the group so special to begin with. Though many songs work with full arrangements like "Fade Into You," a thick but never once overpowering combination, two heavily stripped-down songs demonstrate in different ways how Mazzy Star makes a virtue out of simplicity. "Mary of Silence" is an organ-led slow shuffle that easily ranks with the best of the Doors, strung-out and captivating all at once, Sandoval's singing and Roback's careful acid soloing perfect foils. "Wasted," meanwhile, revisits a classic blues riff slowed down to near-soporific levels, but the snarling crunch of Roback's guitar works wonders against Sandoval's vocals, a careful balance that holds. If there's a left-field standout, then unquestionably it's "Five String Serenade." A cover of an Arthur Lee song -- for once not a Love-era number, but a then-recent effort -- Roback's delicate acoustic guitar effortlessly brings out its simple beauty. Tambourine and violin add just enough to the arrangement here and there, and Sandoval's calm singing makes for the icing on the cake. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 24, 2013 | Rhymes of an Hour Records

Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk
Mazzy Star's first album since 1996's Among My Swan, 2013's Seasons of Your Day reunites guitarist David Roback and singer Hope Sandoval for a set of hazy, psychedelic songs that bring an unexpected country influence to their familiar dreamy sound. Having broken through with the dream pop anthem "Fade Into You" off 1993's So Tonight That I Might See, Mazzy Star became the poster children for a specific brand of atmospheric, melancholic pop that combined the fairy-like qualities of '60s folk, the lo-fi melodicism of the Velvet Underground, and the fuzzy guitar atmospherics of early-'90s shoegaze. After further cementing their status as cult favorites with their third album, Among My Swan, Mazzy Star became displeased with the direction of their career and went on indefinite hiatus. Sandoval stayed busy performing with former My Bloody Valentine drummer Colm Ó Cíosóig as Hope Sandoval & the Warm Inventions, and even released two solo albums with 2001's Bavarian Fruit Bread and 2009's Through the Devil Softly. However, despite the many ensuing projects between Among My Swan and now, Seasons of Your Day still sounds very much like previous Mazzy Star albums. Here we get Roback's spacy mix of acoustic and electric guitars that frame Sandoval's gentle, yearning vocals. What's new here is a world-weariness and maturity, both in style and in overall feel. Roback displays a much more pronounced country and blues influence with several cuts, including "I've Gotta Stop," "Sparrow," and "Flying Low," built largely around his deep string bends, serpentine country-rock riffs, and liberal use of a guitar slide. The result sounds quite in tune with '70s Laurel Canyon artists like Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris. It also brings to mind a lo-fi, psychedelic version of the late, legendary Texas singer/songwriter Townes Van Zandt. In essence, the album is everything you could want, finding Mazzy Star older and wiser, but still as dreamy as ever. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1996 | Capitol Records

Having built up a considerable reputation thanks to So Tonight That I Might See, Mazzy Star reappeared after three years with Among My Swan, only to receive widespread indifference. It's a touch surprising -- unlike, say, fellow 1993 breakthroughs the Cranberries, David Roback and Hope Sandoval didn't rapidly descend into self-parody crossed with delusions of grandeur. Instead, they kept on keeping on, proffering the same combination of psych, blues, folk, and art-pop touches that made their earlier releases so captivating. That said, though, at base Among My Swan just isn't as quietly involving as the earlier records, that magical fusion of styles somehow coming across as a little been-there, done-that here. There's nothing quite as immediate as "Fade Into You," nothing as awesomely delicate as "Five String Serenade," as woozy and powerful as "Mary of Silence." There are plenty of songs that try for that, though, and even if Among My Swan won't raise the dead or heal the sick, it's still pleasant enough listening, and sometimes the secret of success is in the details. Keep an ear out for the soft chimes that punctuate "Happy," for instance, or how William Reid from the Jesus and Mary Chain's guest guitar helps turn "Take Everything" into the slow-burning monster it is. Sandoval's singing is as drowsily intoxicating as before, while Roback's ability to create atmospheres is equally fine. Among the better moments: "Rhymes of an Hour," which carefully balances a quieter arrangement with sudden moments that almost but don't quite lead to a full-band jam; the acoustic-based mood-out "All Your Sisters," suggesting such earlier guitar/violin efforts as "Into Dust"; and the soft-landing conclusion, "Look on Down from the Bridge," a bit of a church hymn in its own way, thanks to the organ-led melody. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1990 | Capitol Records

Mazzy Star's debut, She Hangs Brightly, picks up where Opal's Happy Nightmare Baby left off; merely exchanging Kendra Smith's languorous vocals for the sultrier presence of Hope Sandoval, David Roback continues chasing the neo-psychedelic holy grail he's pursued since his days with the Rain Parade, albeit with mixed success here. After opening with a pair of standouts, the dreamy "Halah" and the garage-inspired "Blue Flower,"...the group demonstrates a solid grasp of atmosphere and texture... © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 1, 2018 | Rhymes of an Hour Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 18, 2015 | FMIC

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 31, 2018 | Vogon

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 22, 2019 | Code 7 Distribution

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 20, 2014 | Rhymes of an Hour Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 17, 2018 | Rhymes of an Hour Records

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Pop - Released August 5, 2020 | Blue Cactus

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Mazzy Star in the magazine