Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD€14.99

R&B - Released January 1, 2008 | UNI - MOTOWN

The Definitive Collection does an effective job of chronicling the majority of Martha & the Vandellas biggest hits from their first chart entry "Come and Get These Memories" in 1963 to their final one, "Honey Chile," in 1967. All of the familiar radio tracks such as "Heatwave," "Dancing in the Street," "Nowhere to Run," and "Jimmy Mack" are featured alongside several singles of equal quality that didn't get as much radio play upon initial release. While there are other, more exhaustive compilations, such as the double-disc set Live Wire! The Singles 1962-1972, this is the best concise overview of Martha & the Vandellas' career, containing the most hits on a single disc. © Al Campbell /TiVo
From
CD€13.99

R&B - Released January 1, 1998 | Motown

This volume of Motown's Ultimate Collection series was especially welcome, as there was no box set on Martha & the Vandellas for serious fans to go to (there was Live Wire!, a now-deleted two-CD compilation of single A- and B-sides, but that's not quite the same thing). This disc put the group's 25 most important tracks, all of the pop and R&B hits plus the most significant B-sides and an album track or two, together in one place. What's more, it did it in what was then state-of-the-art sound, something that few Motown CDs had ever been able to boast of. Thus, the musical content is a given and then some, and the power of Martha Reeves' lead singing and the surrounding harmonies comes through as never before. It's most gratifying on some of the harder dance numbers, such as "(Love Is Like A) Heat Wave" and "Dancing in the Street," to hear the gorgeously complex percussive mix of piano, bass, and drums (lots of drums) pounding away to their own rhythms within the overall beats of the songs -- the detail is there, without sacrificing any of the raw power of the songs and the mixes. Add to that decent annotation, discography, and musician information, and this is an essential part of any soul or '60s collection and, indeed, until Motown began reissuing Martha & the Vandellas albums in 2002 in England, the only way to get a significant chunk of their music with good sound. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
From
CD€14.99

R&B - Released January 1, 2013 | UNI - MOTOWN

Martha & the Vandellas began making their first noise on the pop and soul charts with this 1963 album. The title song was a classic, while there were also decent remakes of such vintage tunes as "Mocking Bird" and "My Boyfriend's Back." These proved that the group was a singles rather than an album act, and that a little more effort needed to be extended toward finding more material (they even put "Danke Schoen" on this album). But no one really cared, since "Heat Wave" was such a triumph. © Ron Wynn /TiVo
From
CD€20.99

R&B - Released January 1, 2006 | Universal Music Enterprises

Martha Reeves certainly has come a long way since her days as an A&R assistant at Motown, crafting hit after hit and helping mold the powerhouse Motown sound of the '60s. But what's surprising is that there's really not that many greatest-hits compilations that are both thorough and readily available to discover just how deep the Reeves & the Vandellas catalog truly is. Thankfully, Gold corrects that and then some. Under the steady hand of Motown superhero and Universal executive Harry Weinger, the Motown catalog, which has been long weathered over time, is starting to shine impeccably, and this two-disc, 42-song offering is concrete proof. Gold works its way through their career in chronological fashion, but wastes no time in offering the best of the bunch with "Heatwave" as the third track. All of the other biggest hits are here and then some, and kudos for the inclusion of "There He Is (At My Door)," the B-side to their most well-known single, "Dancing in the Street," as well as the Frank Wilson-penned "It's Easy to Fall in Love (With a Guy Like You)," originally found on the excellent Cellarful of Motown! anthology. The second disc wanes on the Motown stompers a bit, but there's plenty of soulful delights to appease even the most stringent of connoisseurs. Also a pleasant surprise is the inclusion of later '70s material recorded post-Motown at Arista and MCA, including Martha's solo works as well as her cover of Van Morrison's "Wild Night." Overall, it's a great starting point for the casual listener and probably the most reasonable and thorough anthology on the market and most likely one of the best compilations for the Vandellas that will ever be assembled. © Rob Theakston /TiVo
From
CD€14.99

R&B - Released January 1, 2013 | UNI - MOTOWN

From
CD€14.99

R&B - Released January 1, 1965 | UNI - MOTOWN

One of the great party albums of the 1960s, Dance Party was, oddly enough, the work of a Motown act that wasn't known for delivering great albums. Martha & the Vandellas had enjoyed some serious hits from 1964 onward, but hadn't quite measured up in the LP department until the release of Dance Party in the spring of 1965. Made up of material from singles that went back to the previous summer, the album benefited from the presence of the group's biggest single, "Dancing in the Street," its follow-up, the hypnotically pounding, driving, soaring "Wild One," and the classic "Nowhere to Run," surrounded by a trio of well-above-average B-sides and covers of such Motown dance standards as "Mickey's Monkey" and "Hitch Hike." Even the rest was hardly filler, however, with Martha Reeves turning in a gloriously impassioned performance on the ballad "There He Is (At My Door)" and the group acquitting itself beautifully on "Motoring." Each side was always good for at least two plays at any self-respecting teen party of the '60s, and it all still holds up today. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
From
CD€3.99

R&B - Released January 1, 2008 | Universal Music Group International

From
CD€14.99

R&B - Released January 1, 1999 | Motown

Like any record company worth their salt, MCA knows a good gimmick when they see it, and when the millennium came around, the 20th Century Masters -- The Millennium Collection wasn't too far behind. Supposedly, the millennium is a momentous occasion, but it's hard to feel that way when it's used as another excuse to turn out a budget-line series. But apart from the presumptuous title, 20th Century Masters -- The Millennium Collection turns out to be a very good budget-line series. True, it's impossible for any of these brief collections to be definitive, but they're nevertheless solid samplers and don't feature a bad song in the bunch. For example, take Martha Reeves & the Vandellas' 20th Century volume -- it's an irresistible budget-priced summary of their prime Motown recordings. There may be a couple of noteworthy songs missing, but many of their best-known songs are here, including "Nowhere to Run," "Heatwave," "Jimmy Mack," and "Dancing in the Street." Serious fans will want something more extensive, but this is an excellent introduction for neophytes and a great sampler for casual fans, considering its length and price. That doesn't erase the ridiculousness of the series title, but the silliness is excusable when the music and the collections are good. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD€27.99

Pop - Released April 12, 2013 | UNI - MOTOWN

Booklet
Like their 2011-released 50th anniversary sets for the Temptations and Diana Ross & the Supremes, Motown Select's compilation of Martha Reeves & the Vandellas' singles is a three-disc anthology packaged hardcover book-style -- like the Complete Motown Singles volumes. It clearly has the serious collector in mind. The book within is packed with images and information, some of which is justifiably adapted from Complete Motown Singles. Discs one and two cover the A-sides and B-sides, 1962-1972, including the Top Ten hits "Heat Wave," "Dancing in the Street," "Nowhere to Run," and "I'm Ready for Love." The third disc consists of previously unreleased material. That's right; there is no overlap with Spellbound: Motown Lost and Found. That extensive 2005 set didn't come close to draining the tank, as there's a bounty of fascinating material, such as versions of Thomas Coman/Sylvester Stewart's "C'mon and Swim," Ivy Jo Hunter/Stevie Wonder's "Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever," the Corporation's "He's Good" (recorded by the Jackson 5 as Maybe Tomorrow's "She's Good"), and the Doors' "Light My Fire." "Hooked Real Good on a Bad Thing," for whatever reason, never saw the light of day and wasn't handed to another Motown act -- a shame since it's a fine Ashford & Simpson-written song. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
CD€41.99

Soul - Released April 12, 2013 | UNI - MOTOWN

Like their 2011-released 50th anniversary sets for the Temptations and Diana Ross & the Supremes, Motown Select's compilation of Martha Reeves & the Vandellas' singles is a three-disc anthology packaged hardcover book-style -- like the Complete Motown Singles volumes. It clearly has the serious collector in mind. The book within is packed with images and information, some of which is justifiably adapted from Complete Motown Singles. Discs one and two cover the A-sides and B-sides, 1962-1972, including the Top Ten hits "Heat Wave," "Dancing in the Street," "Nowhere to Run," and "I'm Ready for Love." The third disc consists of previously unreleased material. That's right; there is no overlap with Spellbound: Motown Lost and Found. That extensive 2005 set didn't come close to draining the tank, as there's a bounty of fascinating material, such as versions of Thomas Coman/Sylvester Stewart's "C'mon and Swim," Ivy Jo Hunter/Stevie Wonder's "Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever," the Corporation's "He's Good" (recorded by the Jackson 5 as Maybe Tomorrow's "She's Good"), and the Doors' "Light My Fire." "Hooked Real Good on a Bad Thing," for whatever reason, never saw the light of day and wasn't handed to another Motown act -- a shame since it's a fine Ashford & Simpson-written song. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
CD€5.99

Pop - Released May 10, 2020 | G Records

From
CD€14.99

R&B - Released January 1, 2013 | UNI - MOTOWN

This represents their last gasp as a commercially viable recording act, with minor singles and the usual filler. Like their stable mates the Supremes and the Four Tops, they suffered commercially as well as artistically from the abrupt departure of the Holland-Dozier-Holland production team. Aside from "Honey Chile," their last major pop hit (staff songwriter Sylvia Moy conceived the song with Reeves in mind), there's not much to recommend that rises above conventional adequacy, though "(We've Got) Honey Love" is a decent confection and "Love Bug Leave My Heart Alone" was a modest Top 40 hit. © John Lowe /TiVo
From
CD€10.99

R&B - Released January 1, 2013 | UNI - MOTOWN

Martha & the Vandellas were nearing the end when this LP was issued. They reformed in 1971 with Martha's sister Lois Reeves and Sandra Tilley, and made one last attempt at pop and soul glory. But while Reeves still had the old power, drive, and fire, they weren't getting the inspiring songs or magnificent lyrics of their timeless 1960s hits. Instead, the best tunes, such as "Bless You," "No One There," or "Your Love Makes It Worthwhile," seemed like second-level material that would have simply filled out earlier releases. No hits resulted from this album, and Reeves would soon be a solo performer. © Ron Wynn /TiVo
From
CD€14.99

R&B - Released January 1, 1969 | UNI - MOTOWN

Here Motown holds a fire sale in an effort to keep the Vandellas as a viable commercial force in the pop marketplace. The closest thing resembling a hit here is "Taking My Love (And Leaving Me)," a mild soul hit that missed making the pop charts. Since the exodus of Holland-Dozier-Holland, Reeves had to struggle to get good material. And though she is struggling with not too distinctive material from second-tier songwriters, she does pull it off respectfully. "You're the Loser Now" is one of her better later efforts. © John Lowe /TiVo
From
CD€14.99

R&B - Released January 1, 2013 | UNI - MOTOWN

By this time Motown was trying to turn Reeves into a Diana Ross clone, with sometimes disastrous results (case in point: "The Hurt Is Over"). Even so, there is the curiousity item that arouses some interest, like the bluesy stroll ballad "Love, Guess Who" and the anti-Vietnam War soap opera "I Should Be Proud." Unfortunately, their inclusion in Live Wire! The Singles 1962-1972 renders its value redundant. © John Lowe /TiVo
From
CD€14.99

R&B - Released January 1, 1963 | Motown

Their debut album finds The Vandellas in a more lightweight and pop-oriented style than they would become known for, with some girl group and doo-wop roots still in evidence. As was often the case during this era, the best tracks were the singles: the title track (the group's first big hit), "There He Is (At My Door)," and The Shirelles-like "I'll Have To Let Him Go." Most of the material was written by Holland-Dozier-Holland, but beyond the singles, there aren't any exceptionally noteworthy cuts. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
From
CD€8.99

R&B - Released May 14, 2021 | Water Features

From
CD€8.99

R&B - Released January 13, 2019 | Archive Catapult

From
CD€8.99

R&B - Released June 17, 2019 | Carooousel & mooore

From
CD€8.99

R&B - Released January 10, 2020 | classics. Re. 329