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Folk - Released December 18, 2020 | Debay Sounds,LLC

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Like most seemingly overnight successes, Maggie Rogers put years of work into developing her music. Unlike some artists, she embraces her earliest output, and on Notes from the Archive: Recordings 2011 -- 2016, she traces her artistic evolution from her college days to the year of her breakout hit "Alaska." Released on her own Debay imprint, the collection gathers remastered tracks from her two independently released albums, 2012's The Echo and 2014's Blood Ballet, as well as several previously unreleased tracks. Many of these are from her time with the band the Del Water Gap, and fans might be surprised at how different they sound from "Alaska" and Heard It in a Past Life. On "Celadon & Gold," her voice is charismatic as ever, but the hard-hitting rhythm section and guitars evoke Eisley and other indie rock acts with heart-on-sleeve female vocalists who hold their own against the din of their bandmates. While barbed-yet-dreamy songs such as "One More Afternoon" and "Together" are strong, they sound a little cluttered compared to the compilation's later tracks. The pretty, guileless indie folk of The Echo shows Rogers quickly learned to emphasize her voice and lyrics, whether on the wise-beyond-its-years "Kids Like Us" or "Satellite," a seven-minute ballad that barely feels big enough to contain all of her emotions. Her music becomes even more focused on the songs from Blood Ballet, which make up the majority of Notes from the Archive. Her big-hearted songwriting shines on "Anybody," and the clarity of the title track's imagery ("I would build a city out of you and me") matches the growing presence of her vocals. The Blood Ballet tracks also foreshadow the adventurous direction Rogers took a little while later. With its ringing banjos and huge drums, "Resonant Body" lives up to its name and sets her voice like a jewel; "James," which finds her bidding a country boy goodbye as she heads for the big city, hints at how seamlessly she would blend rootsy and polished elements on her viral hit. A comprehensive, satisfying primer, Notes from the Archive: Recordings 2011 -- 2016 reflects just how quickly her skill and inspiration grew over a handful of years. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 18, 2019 | Capitol Records

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On the album cover of Heard It in a Past Life, Maggie Rogers looks at us as she lets a large red sheet float in the air, preparing to wrap us in her scarlet love. Through this symbolic gesture, the singer protects an audience that in turn protects her from the dark side of the limelight. The dazzling fame that the singer has recently become familiar with is precisely the subject of this debut album. In 2016, Maggie Rogers blew up the charts with her single Alaska, which (of course) we find on Heard It in a Past Life, alongside her other single Light on. The latter evokes the contradictory feelings that come with this flashy glory – on the one hand, there’s the anguish of being swept away, even destroyed, by a wave that you can’t always control. But on the other, there’s the joy brought by a benevolent audience. The same is true on Burning, in which the young woman from Maryland describes the tiring lifestyle that fame brings: "I've been sleeping/Barely dreaming/Through one year and one half." There’s an element of Judy Garland in Pharrell Williams' protégée, both in her complex relationships with success as well as in her vibrant voice.Perfectly reflecting Rogers' personality at this moment in time, the album is often energetic (with beats that get you up and dancing) yet displays an underlying melancholy. In Past Life, this sadness is explicitly expressed through her beautifully soft vocals. "Maybe there's a past life coming out inside of me", she sings – there’s a nostalgia for life before her success that she wants to keep hold of, so as not to lose control. In Retrograde, she even leans towards a regressive feeling. Perhaps this success came too soon, as she seems to admit on Say It. But in the final song, she emphasizes this vital force that never completely leaves her (Back in My Body). Generally speaking, the "positive melancholy" that characterizes Maggie Rogers on this album has the merit of making people dance while being highly introspective. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 21, 2019 | Capitol Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 16, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

Now That the Light Is Fading is the first major-label release from Maggie Rogers, a modern singer/songwriter who first started releasing indie digital EPs back in 2012. This EP arrives five years later, which may be why it seems eerily assured. Unlike many debuts, Rogers isn't stumbling through either her songs or sound. These five songs -- all anchored in atmospheric electronics -- are assured, tightly constructed compositions graced with glassy electronics. Rogers' vocals wind up giving these otherwise icy productions some warmth, and if the five songs all adhere to a general aesthetic, they're also varied. "Color Song" is a tone poem, "Alaska" feels as intimate as a straight folk song, "On + Off" percolates with a distinct claustrophobic rhythm, "Dog Years" is as stylish as Elle Goulding, and "Better" is a bittersweet denouement. All combined, this adds up to a rich and impressive official debut. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Folk - Released December 18, 2020 | Debay Sounds,LLC

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The tag is simple: Maggie Rogers is the singer who melted Pharrell Williams's heart. It was in 2016, during a masterclass given by the great mogul of contemporary pop. Since then, she has melted the hearts of the rest of the world with her song Alaska, and then with her debut album which came out in 2019. But for the American, who wrote her first song at the age of twelve, there was a musical life before success, documented on this youthful compilation. Heard It in a Past Life, Maggie Rogers' first hit album, boasts a professional production that sits between pop-folk and electro. Her older, self-produced songs have the charm of music created by a student, with smaller means but vast dreams, and a certain talent. In the intro and several times in the album, we hear a kind of self-interview conducted by the singer, where she presents the history and context of her sixteen songs. Like Benjamin Button, they appear in four retrospective chapters, ordered from the most recent to the oldest, written on the piano when Maggie Rogers was 18 years old. At the time she was playing a lot of banjo, and her voice was already taking wing. Her music is very folk, rooted in the American tradition, sometimes evoking the work of Gillian Welch. No one had really heard these compositions before, and discovering them in this way (presented by the singer) is a real moment of shared emotion and intimacy. © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 19, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Folk - Released December 18, 2020 | Debay Sounds,LLC

Like most seemingly overnight successes, Maggie Rogers put years of work into developing her music. Unlike some artists, she embraces her earliest output, and on Notes from the Archive: Recordings 2011 -- 2016, she traces her artistic evolution from her college days to the year of her breakout hit "Alaska." Released on her own Debay imprint, the collection gathers remastered tracks from her two independently released albums, 2012's The Echo and 2014's Blood Ballet, as well as several previously unreleased tracks. Many of these are from her time with the band the Del Water Gap, and fans might be surprised at how different they sound from "Alaska" and Heard It in a Past Life. On "Celadon & Gold," her voice is charismatic as ever, but the hard-hitting rhythm section and guitars evoke Eisley and other indie rock acts with heart-on-sleeve female vocalists who hold their own against the din of their bandmates. While barbed-yet-dreamy songs such as "One More Afternoon" and "Together" are strong, they sound a little cluttered compared to the compilation's later tracks. The pretty, guileless indie folk of The Echo shows Rogers quickly learned to emphasize her voice and lyrics, whether on the wise-beyond-its-years "Kids Like Us" or "Satellite," a seven-minute ballad that barely feels big enough to contain all of her emotions. Her music becomes even more focused on the songs from Blood Ballet, which make up the majority of Notes from the Archive. Her big-hearted songwriting shines on "Anybody," and the clarity of the title track's imagery ("I would build a city out of you and me") matches the growing presence of her vocals. The Blood Ballet tracks also foreshadow the adventurous direction Rogers took a little while later. With its ringing banjos and huge drums, "Resonant Body" lives up to its name and sets her voice like a jewel; "James," which finds her bidding a country boy goodbye as she heads for the big city, hints at how seamlessly she would blend rootsy and polished elements on her viral hit. A comprehensive, satisfying primer, Notes from the Archive: Recordings 2011 -- 2016 reflects just how quickly her skill and inspiration grew over a handful of years. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 4, 2019 | Capitol Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 20, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 7, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 28, 2021 | Capitol Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 30, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Folk - Released December 18, 2020 | Debay Sounds,LLC

The tag is simple: Maggie Rogers is the singer who melted Pharrell Williams's heart. It was in 2016, during a masterclass given by the great mogul of contemporary pop. Since then, she has melted the hearts of the rest of the world with her song Alaska, and then with her debut album which came out in 2019. But for the American, who wrote her first song at the age of twelve, there was a musical life before success, documented on this youthful compilation. Heard It in a Past Life, Maggie Rogers' first hit album, boasts a professional production that sits between pop-folk and electro. Her older, self-produced songs have the charm of music created by a student, with smaller means but vast dreams, and a certain talent. In the intro and several times in the album, we hear a kind of self-interview conducted by the singer, where she presents the history and context of her sixteen songs. Like Benjamin Button, they appear in four retrospective chapters, ordered from the most recent to the oldest, written on the piano when Maggie Rogers was 18 years old. At the time she was playing a lot of banjo, and her voice was already taking wing. Her music is very folk, rooted in the American tradition, sometimes evoking the work of Gillian Welch. No one had really heard these compositions before, and discovering them in this way (presented by the singer) is a real moment of shared emotion and intimacy. © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 23, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 21, 2019 | Capitol Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 26, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 21, 2018 | Capitol Records

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Folk - Released December 18, 2020 | Debay Sounds,LLC

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Like most seemingly overnight successes, Maggie Rogers put years of work into developing her music. Unlike some artists, she embraces her earliest output, and on Notes from the Archive: Recordings 2011 -- 2016, she traces her artistic evolution from her college days to the year of her breakout hit "Alaska." Released on her own Debay imprint, the collection gathers remastered tracks from her two independently released albums, 2012's The Echo and 2014's Blood Ballet, as well as several previously unreleased tracks. Many of these are from her time with the band the Del Water Gap, and fans might be surprised at how different they sound from "Alaska" and Heard It in a Past Life. On "Celadon & Gold," her voice is charismatic as ever, but the hard-hitting rhythm section and guitars evoke Eisley and other indie rock acts with heart-on-sleeve female vocalists who hold their own against the din of their bandmates. While barbed-yet-dreamy songs such as "One More Afternoon" and "Together" are strong, they sound a little cluttered compared to the compilation's later tracks. The pretty, guileless indie folk of The Echo shows Rogers quickly learned to emphasize her voice and lyrics, whether on the wise-beyond-its-years "Kids Like Us" or "Satellite," a seven-minute ballad that barely feels big enough to contain all of her emotions. Her music becomes even more focused on the songs from Blood Ballet, which make up the majority of Notes from the Archive. Her big-hearted songwriting shines on "Anybody," and the clarity of the title track's imagery ("I would build a city out of you and me") matches the growing presence of her vocals. The Blood Ballet tracks also foreshadow the adventurous direction Rogers took a little while later. With its ringing banjos and huge drums, "Resonant Body" lives up to its name and sets her voice like a jewel; "James," which finds her bidding a country boy goodbye as she heads for the big city, hints at how seamlessly she would blend rootsy and polished elements on her viral hit. A comprehensive, satisfying primer, Notes from the Archive: Recordings 2011 -- 2016 reflects just how quickly her skill and inspiration grew over a handful of years. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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CD€1.99

Alternative & Indie - Released April 28, 2021 | Capitol Records

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CD€1.99

Folk - Released December 18, 2020 | Debay Sounds,LLC

Like most seemingly overnight successes, Maggie Rogers put years of work into developing her music. Unlike some artists, she embraces her earliest output, and on Notes from the Archive: Recordings 2011 -- 2016, she traces her artistic evolution from her college days to the year of her breakout hit "Alaska." Released on her own Debay imprint, the collection gathers remastered tracks from her two independently released albums, 2012's The Echo and 2014's Blood Ballet, as well as several previously unreleased tracks. Many of these are from her time with the band the Del Water Gap, and fans might be surprised at how different they sound from "Alaska" and Heard It in a Past Life. On "Celadon & Gold," her voice is charismatic as ever, but the hard-hitting rhythm section and guitars evoke Eisley and other indie rock acts with heart-on-sleeve female vocalists who hold their own against the din of their bandmates. While barbed-yet-dreamy songs such as "One More Afternoon" and "Together" are strong, they sound a little cluttered compared to the compilation's later tracks. The pretty, guileless indie folk of The Echo shows Rogers quickly learned to emphasize her voice and lyrics, whether on the wise-beyond-its-years "Kids Like Us" or "Satellite," a seven-minute ballad that barely feels big enough to contain all of her emotions. Her music becomes even more focused on the songs from Blood Ballet, which make up the majority of Notes from the Archive. Her big-hearted songwriting shines on "Anybody," and the clarity of the title track's imagery ("I would build a city out of you and me") matches the growing presence of her vocals. The Blood Ballet tracks also foreshadow the adventurous direction Rogers took a little while later. With its ringing banjos and huge drums, "Resonant Body" lives up to its name and sets her voice like a jewel; "James," which finds her bidding a country boy goodbye as she heads for the big city, hints at how seamlessly she would blend rootsy and polished elements on her viral hit. A comprehensive, satisfying primer, Notes from the Archive: Recordings 2011 -- 2016 reflects just how quickly her skill and inspiration grew over a handful of years. © Heather Phares /TiVo