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Pop - Released May 24, 2019 | Sony Music Entertainment

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Pop - Released March 23, 2015 | Ariola

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World - Released March 3, 2009 | Parlophone Spain

The fifth album by this multicultural outfit from Barcelona offers few surprises but confirms everything that is good about Macaco. Singer and songwriter Dani Carbonell delivers another set of life-affirming tunes set to a catchy mixture of reggae and rhumba enhanced by electronic touches. Comparisons to Manu Chao are unavoidable, although by virtue of being a band Macaco have a more organic sound than Chao's patented "one man and his laptop" collages. Furthermore, while Carbonell's lyrics also deal mostly with the itinerant lifestyle, they tend to be more optimistic as they repeatedly stress the importance of living the present. A sailor's life is Puerto Presente's main metaphor, with plenty of references to the sea, traveling, brief encounters, moving on, and always looking forward to the next harbor. Predictably, the entire album oozes the international peace-loving/rebel vibe of Bob Marley and John Lennon. Both icons are dutifully quoted in this album, as equally are fusion flamenco guitarist Raimundo Amador and legendary Catalan songwriter Joan Manuel Serrat. These four artists together can neatly be taken as Macaco's cardinal points. Puerto Presente is above all a cohesive album with a great listening flow. Songs are virtually interchangeable, but all are strong to the point that any could have been a single: "Amor Marinero," "Seguiremos," "Tengo," and it goes on. The chosen one, "Moving," however, did not do badly at all as it featured in the popular soccer video game FIFA 09, as well as in a video for National Geographic's Earth Day that included cameos by Juanes, Juan Luis Guerra, Rosario Flores, Carlinhos Brown, and Javier Bardem, among others. © Mariano Prunes /TiVo
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Pop - Released April 3, 2006 | Parlophone Spain

Featuring songs performed in English, Spanish, Italian, French, and Portuguese, Ingravitto is the multi-lingual fourth studio album from the genre-hopping international collective Macaco. Released in 2006, the follow-up to Entre Raices y Antenas includes the singles "Sideral" and "Mama Tierra," and collaborations with Chambao's La Mari ("Somos Luz"), and Italian MC CapaRezza ("Las Luces de La Ciudad"). © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 7, 2014 | Ariola

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Pop - Released February 22, 2019 | Sony Music Entertainment

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World - Released October 5, 2001 | edel records

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Pop - Released March 23, 2012 | Parlophone Spain

El Murmullo del Fuego is the sixth album by Dani Carbonell's Macaco, and the long-awaited proper follow-up to 2009's Puerto Presente, his big commercial and international breakthrough. Produced by Jules Bikoko and Roger Rodés, but for the conspicuous absence of programming the album does not tamper much with Macaco's patented infectious sonic collages, a blend of reggae, worldbeat, and rumba catalana reminiscent of Manu Chao -- but with a positivist rather than militant outlook. For a case in point, look no further than the warm pan-global vibe of first single "Love Is the Only Way," and its video shot in several locales around the world. © Mariano Prunes /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 23, 2010 | Parlophone Spain

Macaco's Dani Carbonell won't be the first or the last artist who, as soon as he achieved massive popularity, promptly release a greatest-hits package while still riding on the crest of the wave. The double-CD El Vecindario, one year after Puerto Presente took Macaco to the top of the Spanish charts, does exactly that, albeit with a slight twist. Instead of a compilation of Macaco's key songs in their original version, Carbonell chooses to invite all of his international friends to his party, resulting in a package that is a hybrid between a greatest hits and a duet album. By and large, the instrumental tracks do not appear to have been greatly altered, only the vocals have been re-recorded to accommodate the guest vocalists. However, since the very collage-like structure of Macaco's songs is ready made for the pasting of different vocals, the final result seldom feels significantly different from the original version, even if El Vecindario's guests are often big names with distinct artistic personalities. Reflecting Macaco's multicultural philosophy, these come from all regions of Spain, as well as Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Argentina, Uruguay, the U.S., and Senegal: La Mari, Fito Cabrales, Estopa, Muchachito Bombo Inferno, Bebe, Rosario Flores, La Shica, and Natalia Lafourcade, among many others. To round things up, El Vecindario adds two new songs (although these had previously appeared in compilations), and a cover of Toots & the Maytals "Monkey Man." It is, of course, an eminently enjoyable affair, but not without a few caveats. First of all, the total of 20 tracks and 80 minutes could have presumably fit onto a single CD, thus lowering the price. Secondly, 13 songs come from Macaco's last two albums, Puerto Presente and Ingravitto. Putting the three new tracks aside, that leaves only four songs covering the first three Macaco records. In other words, even if it is a double CD, El Vecindario cannot be taken as a comprehensive overview of Macaco's 15-year career. In fact, since almost half this compilation comes from Puerto Presente, often feels like one is listening to a remixed version of that album, rather than to a greatest hits. This does not in any way diminish El Vecindario's listening pleasure, as Puerto Presente and Ingravitto were great albums, but for those who already own them, El Vecindario is a pretty unnecessary purchase. For those unfamiliar with the band, this is a great introduction to their peace loving, all-encompassing embrace of rumba, hip-hop, reggae, pop, and world music; but then again, so are their last two studio albums. El Vecindario also comes in a special edition with a DVD featuring five video clips, as well as interviews with the guest artists involved in this compilation. © Mariano Prunes /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 6, 2016 | Ariola

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Pop - Released March 6, 2020 | Sony Music Entertainment

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Pop - Released January 12, 2015 | Ariola

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Pop - Released January 1, 2004 | Parlophone Spain

Fusing an eclectic combination of electro, rhumba, Latin pop, funkh and hip-hop, Entre Raices y Antenas is the third studio album from Macaco, the multi-national collective fronted by former Ojos de Brujo lead singer Dani Carbonell. Released in 2004, the follow-up to Rumbo Submarino includes the singles "Giratutto" and "Todos," and the English-language track "People." A bonus edition featuring thirteen new tracks was also released. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Latin America - Released June 11, 1999 | earMUSIC

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Pop - Released February 10, 2012 | Parlophone Spain

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Pop - Released June 12, 2020 | Sony Music Entertainment

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Pop - Released June 22, 2007 | Parlophone Spain

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Pop - Released July 3, 2020 | Sony Music Entertainment

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Reggae - Released October 18, 2016 | Mundo Zurdo S.L.

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Pop - Released June 29, 2018 | Sony Music Entertainment

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