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Alternative & Indie - Released October 28, 2013 | Universal Records

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Signed to a major label at an early age, she was groomed in the darkness of studios, the label knowing the potential they had in their singer/songwriter. She wrote on her own, then she was paired with a sympathetic producer/songwriter, live performances taking a back seat to woodshedding. If this story in the early years of the 2010s brings to mind Lana Del Rey, it's no coincidence that it also applies to New Zealand singer/songwriter Lorde, whose 2013 debut, Pure Heroine, contains all of the stylized goth foreboding of LDR's Born to Die and almost none of the louche, languid glamour. This is not a small thing. Lana Del Rey is a self-created starlet willing herself into stardom but Lorde fancies herself a poet, churning away at the darker recesses of her soul. Some of this may be due to age. Lorde, as any pre-release review or portrait helpfully illustrated, was only 16 when she wrote and recorded Pure Heroine with producer Joel Little, and an adolescent aggrievance and angst certainly underpin the songs here. Lorde favors a tragic romanticism, an all-or-nothing melodrama that Little accentuates with his alternately moody and insistent productions. Where Lana Del Rey favors a studiously detached irony, Lorde pours it all out which, in itself, may be an act: her bedsit poetry is superficially more authentic but the music is certainly more pop, both in its construction -- there are big hooks in the choruses and verses -- and in the production, which accentuates a sad shimmer where everything is beautiful and broken. There is a topical appeal here, particularly because Lorde and Little do spend so much time on the surface, turning it into something seductive, but it is no more real than the studied detachment of Lana Del Rey, who Lorde so strongly (and intentionally) resembles. Born to Die is meant to be appreciated as slippery, elusive pop; Pure Heroine seems to hint at the truth...but the truth is, Lorde is a pop invention as much as LDR and is not nearly as honest about her intentions. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 16, 2017 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
It’s easy to be popular and commercial. It is less so to be popular, commercial AND brilliant. Yelich-O’Connor, aka Lorde, runs straight into this category reserved to a fortunate few. With Melodrama, the young New Zealander confirms a talent that was already impressive on Pure Heroine, her first album from 2013 released when she was only 16! All the elements of the pop identity are there. Lorde talks about herself, about being a 20 year old woman from the suburbs, about her dreams, solitude and ennui, about the transition to adulthood, about love of course, and also about disillusionment. In short, no pop cliché is missing. Lorde works wonders with the raw material accessible to all. Without trying to make the genre appear more complex, and staying firmly rooted in it, she establishes her singularity, her style, her name. “Writing Pure Heroine was my way of enshrining our teenage glory, putting it up in lights forever so that part of me never dies. Well, Melodrama is about what comes next... The party is about to start. I am about to show you the new world.” With this second album, she highlights even more the quality of her writing, and of her voice too. Musically, there is no lurid effect because everything is done to magnify the song, and nothing but the song. In a way, the mastery radiating from Melodrama puts her closer to Madonna, Elton John or Kate Bush than to Katy Perry or Miley Cyrus. And in her post teenager coating, she almost offers the ingenuousness of a rather mature soul singer… In short, such an understanding of the pop dialect at only 20 is rather astounding… © CM/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 20, 2021 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

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At 16, Lorde's debut album was all gimlet-eyed precociousness with a side of cynicism; four years later, she delved into, well, melodrama for Melodrama. Now, at 24, she's lightened up and turned her focus to "mystical ambitions" and "inner visions." (And when Lorde, neé Ella Yelich-O'Connor, focuses, she really commits to the theme.) Solar Power is the sound of a questioning young woman wanting to find solace in a trendy brand of spirituality but not always able to shake off the sensation that it might all be a scam. "Mood Ring" adopts an easy-breezy Natasha Bedingfield vibe and sly little New Age guitar flourishes to send up the Instagram wellness culture Lorde readily admits to dabbling in. "Ladies, begin your sun salutations/ transcendental in your meditations," she sings. "I can't feel a thing/ I keep looking at my mood ring." The beachy, Caribbean-kissed "Dominoes" casts a devastatingly casual side-eye at an ex who's gone "all New Age" and is "doing yoga with Uma Thurman's mother just outside of Woodstock": "It's strange to see you smoking marijuana/ You used to do the most cocaine of anyone I'd ever met." Elsewhere, she sounds Joni Mitchell wistful and gets deep, musing how "all the beautiful girls, they will fade like roses" before checking herself: "Maybe I'm just stoned at the nail salon again." The title track finds true solace, though, in the healing power of the sun—not the "golden hour" of aspirational influencers, but high-in-the-sky, blinding, noontime brightness. "Lead the boys and girls onto the beaches/ Come one, come all, I'll tell you my secrets/ I'm kinda like a prettier Jesus," she sings, supported by peers Phoebe Bridgers and Claire "Clairo" Cottrill and carried by a lush Verve-style melody. "Secrets from a Girl (Who's Seen It All)" folks-out like cottage-core Taylor Swift, but to the point that it makes you wonder how much Taylor owes Lorde. The latter cleverly calls on Swedish pop star Robyn to inject a weird and humorous, psych-hazy spoken part—"Thank you for flying with Strange Airlines, I will be your tour guide today/ Your emotional baggage can be picked up at carousel number two." Also like Taylor, Lorde is good at offering fans just enough teases of intimacy: a reference to Carole King presenting her a Grammy (in the twinkling "California"); an ode to her two-decades-older boyfriend (who has an "office job" and "silver hair" and whose "favorite record [is] the same as my father's") in the tender and free-floating "The Man with the Axe." Even without those Easter eggs, Solar Power is a revealing portrait of a girl trying to figure it all out—all while seeming aware of just how much privilege she has. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 11, 2021 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

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"[T]he singles are built primarily around guitar and Lorde’s vocals, finding the singer shining the light that burst out of her earlier singles inward." © TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 28, 2013 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

Signed to a major label at an early age, she was groomed in the darkness of studios, the label knowing the potential they had in their singer/songwriter. She wrote on her own, then she was paired with a sympathetic producer/songwriter, live performances taking a back seat to woodshedding. If this story in the early years of the 2010s brings to mind Lana Del Rey, it's no coincidence that it also applies to New Zealand singer/songwriter Lorde, whose 2013 debut, Pure Heroine, contains all of the stylized goth foreboding of LDR's Born to Die and almost none of the louche, languid glamour. This is not a small thing. Lana Del Rey is a self-created starlet willing herself into stardom but Lorde fancies herself a poet, churning away at the darker recesses of her soul. Some of this may be due to age. Lorde, as any pre-release review or portrait helpfully illustrated, was only 16 when she wrote and recorded Pure Heroine with producer Joel Little, and an adolescent aggrievance and angst certainly underpin the songs here. Lorde favors a tragic romanticism, an all-or-nothing melodrama that Little accentuates with his alternately moody and insistent productions. Where Lana Del Rey favors a studiously detached irony, Lorde pours it all out which, in itself, may be an act: her bedsit poetry is superficially more authentic but the music is certainly more pop, both in its construction -- there are big hooks in the choruses and verses -- and in the production, which accentuates a sad shimmer where everything is beautiful and broken. There is a topical appeal here, particularly because Lorde and Little do spend so much time on the surface, turning it into something seductive, but it is no more real than the studied detachment of Lana Del Rey, who Lorde so strongly (and intentionally) resembles. Born to Die is meant to be appreciated as slippery, elusive pop; Pure Heroine seems to hint at the truth...but the truth is, Lorde is a pop invention as much as LDR and is not nearly as honest about her intentions. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

Signed to a major label at an early age, she was groomed in the darkness of studios, the label knowing the potential they had in their singer/songwriter. She wrote on her own, then she was paired with a sympathetic producer/songwriter, live performances taking a back seat to woodshedding. If this story in the early years of the 2010s brings to mind Lana Del Rey, it's no coincidence that it also applies to New Zealand singer/songwriter Lorde, whose 2013 debut, Pure Heroine, contains all of the stylized goth foreboding of LDR's Born to Die and almost none of the louche, languid glamour. This is not a small thing. Lana Del Rey is a self-created starlet willing herself into stardom but Lorde fancies herself a poet, churning away at the darker recesses of her soul. Some of this may be due to age. Lorde, as any pre-release review or portrait helpfully illustrated, was only 16 when she wrote and recorded Pure Heroine with producer Joel Little, and an adolescent aggrievance and angst certainly underpin the songs here. Lorde favors a tragic romanticism, an all-or-nothing melodrama that Little accentuates with his alternately moody and insistent productions. Where Lana Del Rey favors a studiously detached irony, Lorde pours it all out which, in itself, may be an act: her bedsit poetry is superficially more authentic but the music is certainly more pop, both in its construction -- there are big hooks in the choruses and verses -- and in the production, which accentuates a sad shimmer where everything is beautiful and broken. There is a topical appeal here, particularly because Lorde and Little do spend so much time on the surface, turning it into something seductive, but it is no more real than the studied detachment of Lana Del Rey, who Lorde so strongly (and intentionally) resembles. Born to Die is meant to be appreciated as slippery, elusive pop; Pure Heroine seems to hint at the truth...but the truth is, Lorde is a pop invention as much as LDR and is not nearly as honest about her intentions. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released July 21, 2021 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 20, 2021 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

At 16, Lorde's debut album was all gimlet-eyed precociousness with a side of cynicism; four years later, she delved into, well, melodrama for Melodrama. Now, at 24, she's lightened up and turned her focus to "mystical ambitions" and "inner visions." (And when Lorde, neé Ella Yelich-O'Connor, focuses, she really commits to the theme.) Solar Power is the sound of a questioning young woman wanting to find solace in a trendy brand of spirituality but not always able to shake off the sensation that it might all be a scam. "Mood Ring" adopts an easy-breezy Natasha Bedingfield vibe and sly little New Age guitar flourishes to send up the Instagram wellness culture Lorde readily admits to dabbling in. "Ladies, begin your sun salutations/ transcendental in your meditations," she sings. "I can't feel a thing/ I keep looking at my mood ring." The beachy, Caribbean-kissed "Dominoes" casts a devastatingly casual side-eye at an ex who's gone "all New Age" and is "doing yoga with Uma Thurman's mother just outside of Woodstock": "It's strange to see you smoking marijuana/ You used to do the most cocaine of anyone I'd ever met." Elsewhere, she sounds Joni Mitchell wistful and gets deep, musing how "all the beautiful girls, they will fade like roses" before checking herself: "Maybe I'm just stoned at the nail salon again." The title track finds true solace, though, in the healing power of the sun—not the "golden hour" of aspirational influencers, but high-in-the-sky, blinding, noontime brightness. "Lead the boys and girls onto the beaches/ Come one, come all, I'll tell you my secrets/ I'm kinda like a prettier Jesus," she sings, supported by peers Phoebe Bridgers and Claire "Clairo" Cottrill and carried by a lush Verve-style melody. "Secrets from a Girl (Who's Seen It All)" folks-out like cottage-core Taylor Swift, but to the point that it makes you wonder how much Taylor owes Lorde. The latter cleverly calls on Swedish pop star Robyn to inject a weird and humorous, psych-hazy spoken part—"Thank you for flying with Strange Airlines, I will be your tour guide today/ Your emotional baggage can be picked up at carousel number two." Also like Taylor, Lorde is good at offering fans just enough teases of intimacy: a reference to Carole King presenting her a Grammy (in the twinkling "California"); an ode to her two-decades-older boyfriend (who has an "office job" and "silver hair" and whose "favorite record [is] the same as my father's") in the tender and free-floating "The Man with the Axe." Even without those Easter eggs, Solar Power is a revealing portrait of a girl trying to figure it all out—all while seeming aware of just how much privilege she has. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 10, 2021 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 10, 2021 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 17, 2021 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | Universal Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 11, 2021 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

"[T]he singles are built primarily around guitar and Lorde’s vocals, finding the singer shining the light that burst out of her earlier singles inward." © TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 16, 2017 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 19, 2017 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

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Rock - Released April 4, 2013 | Lorde

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 9, 2018 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 21, 2021 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 17, 2021 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited