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Classical - Released December 6, 2012 | Passacaille

Distinctions Diapason d'or - Exceptional Sound Recording
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Sacred Vocal Music - Released June 24, 2014 | Ricercar

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles Classica
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Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Accent

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc du Monde de la Musique
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Classical - Released October 1, 2017 | Passacaille

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released June 25, 2013 | Accent

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 1, 1997 | Accent

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Accent

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released May 3, 2011 | Accent

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Accent

Distinctions 4 étoiles du Monde de la Musique
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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Accent

Distinctions Diapason découverte
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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Accent

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released September 11, 2020 | Passacaille

Booklet
Less prized than Florence or Venice by tourists, Bologna is however one of the Italian cities most rich in art and history. The seat of the oldest university in the Western World, its musical standing is largely unmatched and its exquisite cuisine is exported all over the world. Bologna has born many artists including Adriano Banchieri, Domenico Gabrielli, Farinelli, Ottorino Respighi, Ruggero Raimondi and the lesser known organist and musicologist Luigi Ferdinando Tagliavini (1929-2017). In addition to his considerable work on the Italian harpsichord and teachings at the universities of Bologna, Padua and Freiburg (Switzerland), he was the happy owner of an extraordinary collection of period instruments which are visible today at the museum of the San Colombano church in his birth town, Bologna. It is here and under the authority of professor Tagliavini that the present album was recorded in 2013. The idea for this project came to him during the exposition of Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring in Bologna in 2014. While examining the virginal figure on another canvas by the Flemish painter, The Music Lesson, Tagliavini conceived this musical programme played on two superb harpsichords from his collection.The pieces chosen are entirely inspired by the relations between Italy and Holland at the time, with composers from the two provinces: Frescobaldi, Sweelinck and many others are presented in a fascinating and particularly intuitive game of mirrors. The Flemish and Italian musicians, Japan Schröder on violin, Liuwe Tamminga on diverse keyboard instruments, Peter Van Heyghen on the recorder and Luigi Ferdinando Tagliavin on harpsichord bring to life this hypothetical and moving meeting of Vermeer and Bologna. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released August 14, 2020 | Passacaille

Booklet
Giovanni Gabrieli is one of these Venetian musicians who appears in all music history surveys, but who is actually much less well known than he deserves to be. Modern brass ensembles sometimes perform some of his instrumental pieces in odd transpositions, and motets in concertato style end up in anthologies to illustrate the combination of cori spezzati sacred music. Yet, he was one of the major organists of his time, who wrote in virtually all common vocal and instrumental musical genres, introduced new compositional techniques, worked in the most important Venetian sacred institutions after a sojourn in Bavaria, and trained some of the most important German and Italian composers of the early 17th century. Giovanni Gabrieli’s complete compositional output is preserved in both printed and manuscripts collections, and consists of about 250 compositions between madrigals (mostly in anthologies), motets, instrumental canzonas and sonatas, and organ pieces (Intonazioni, Ricercari, Canzoni, Toccate, Fughe, and Fantasie). The printed collections of instrumental music that became best known were the Canzoni per sonare con ogni sorte di stromenti (Venice, 1608), and the posthumous Canzoni e Sonate (Venice 1615). Why such polyphonic compositions designated “per ogni sorte di stromenti” (for all sorts of instruments) are performed by two organists in this recording is a consequence of absolute common practice in the 16th and early 17th centuries. In the present recording, the organists have selected eleven double-choir instrumental pieces (for 8, 10 and 12 parts) taken from the three aforementioned prints (of 1597, 1608, and 1615). This selection of eight-to-twelve-part pieces, performed on two of the most beautiful and suitable organs for this repertoire—the two magnificent organs of the San Petronio Basilica in Bologna (unfortunately no comparable organs have survived in Venice) — offers an excellent panorama of Giovanni Gabrieli’s double-choir compositions in the older (canzoni and madrigals) and newer (sonate) forms and styles of the two decades between the late 16th and the early 17th century in Venice. © Passacaille
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Classical - Released November 2, 2012 | Passacaille

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Classical - Released June 20, 2011 | Brilliant Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Accent

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Classical - Released October 1, 2012 | Tactus

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Classical - Released January 1, 2007 | Accent

Booklet
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Classical - Released September 17, 2012 | Passacaille

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Classical - Released September 24, 2008 | Passacaille