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Alternative & Indie - Released March 24, 2003 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 24, 2000 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 14, 2007 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 20, 2012 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 29, 2002 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 13, 2010 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 19, 2017 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 15, 2017 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 15, 2013 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 15, 2013 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 14, 2013 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 16, 2014 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 14, 2013 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 28, 2016 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 14, 2007 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 20, 2012 | Warner Bros.

Linkin Park got pretty moody on 2010's A Thousand Suns, settling into a sulky electronica groove that pretty much screamed "growing pains" to anybody who listened closely. On its 2012 sequel, Living Things, Linkin Park attempts to graft guitars back onto their newly mature musical outlook, and the reintroduction of visceral force certainly helps give this album a pulse lacking on A Thousand Suns. It's hardly a step back to the old angst-ridden rap-rockers of the turn of the millennium, however. Admirably, Linkin Park revels in a near-middle-aged angst, letting their songs address adult concerns and giving their productions contours and texture; the additional noise isn't an expression of fury, it's used to enhance the drama. Generally, the songs feel sharper on Living Things -- there is definition to their structure, some of the choruses catch hold without too much effort -- but this album remains one of sustained mood, not individual moments. And in that regard, Living Things handily trumps A Thousand Suns: it doesn't stay still, it peaks and ebbs, flowing steadily between brooding and explosions of repressed rage, a fitting soundtrack for aging rap-rockers who are comfortable in their skin but restless at heart. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 15, 2017 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 21, 2008 | Warner Records

Like nearly every other live release of the new millennium, Road to Revolution: Live at Milton Keynes is a CD/DVD extravaganza, capturing the entire concert twice, once as a CD, once as a DVD for optimal home viewing. In this case, the concert is Linkin Park's June 29, 2008 show at the Milton Keynes National Bowl, where the band was joined by Jay-Z for two songs on the encore ("Jigga What/Faint," "Numb/Encore"), while rapper Mike Shinoda's side project Fort Minor pop up for "The Rising Tide." This is the third Linkin Park live set -- they arrive like clockwork after every tour -- so it's no surprise that there are no surprises outside of the Jay-Z cameo and perhaps just how big and slick the whole thing sounds; it was mastered to be showcased on surround sound in a home theater. It's big but not ballsy, an appropriate sound for an immaculate performance from Linkin Park -- one that may not exactly replicate the details of their studio versions but certainly doesn't find them coloring outside of the lines. It's something that will surely please fans, the ones that have the other two Linkin Park live sets, but it's not a bracing testament to the band's on-stage prowess. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 28, 2016 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 24, 2003 | Warner Records

Perhaps if the cut-'n'-paste remix record Reanimation hadn't appeared as a stopgap measure in the summer of 2002, Linkin Park's second record, Meteora, would merely have been seen as a continuation of their 2000 debut, Hybrid Theory, instead of a retreat to familiar ground. Then again, Reanimation wasn't much more than a way to buy time (along with maybe a little credibility), so it's unfair to say that its dabbling in electronica and hip-hop truly pointed toward a new direction for the group, but it did provide a more interesting listening experience than Meteora, which is nothing more and nothing less than a Hybrid Theory part two. Which isn't to say that Linkin Park didn't put any effort into the record, since it does demonstrate that the group does stand apart from the pack by having the foresight to smash all nu-metal trademarks -- buzzing guitars, lumbering rhythms, angsty screaming, buried scratching, rapped verses -- into one accessible sound which suggests hooks instead of offering them. More importantly, the group has discipline and editing skills, keeping this record at a tight 36 minutes and 41 seconds, a move that makes it considerably more listenable than its peers and, by extension, more powerful, since they know where to focus their energy, something that many nu-metal bands simply do not. (It must be said that there will surely be consumers out there that will question paying a $19.99 retail for a 36-minute-and-41-second record, though some may prefer getting a tight, listenable record at that price instead of a meandering 70-minute mess.) So, it must be said that Meteora does deliver on the most basic level -- it gives the fans what they want, and it does so with energy and without fuss. It's also without surprises, either, which again gives the album a static feeling -- suggesting not a holding pattern for the band, but rather the limits of their chosen genre, which remains so stylistically rigid and formulaic that even with a band who follows the blueprint well, like Linkin Park, it winds up sounding a little samey and insular. Since this is only their second go-round, this is hardly a fatal flaw, but the similarity of Meteora to Hybrid Theory does not only raise the question of where do they go from here, but whether there is a place for them to go at all. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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Linkin Park in the magazine