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Rock - Released October 21, 2016 | Columbia

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Rock - Released October 21, 2016 | Columbia

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Rock - Released July 25, 1989 | Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
On Christmas 1967, upon the release of his first album, Leonard Cohen is already 33 years old and possesses a solid reputation as a writer. This is probably why the maturity of his incredibly refined folk album imposes its charm so firmly. Though the influence of Greenwich Village’s folk scene in the sixties is undeniably felt, the Canadian singer manages from the very beginning to impose the singularity (much like Dylan, whether we hate him or love him…) of his voice haunted by a kind of sadness. A voice and a gift for writing that bewitched producer John Hammond (who discovered legends such as Billie Holiday, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Aretha Franklin or Stevie Ray Vaughan), who signed him with Columbia. Songs Of Leonard Cohen starts off with the legendary Suzanne, made popular a few months earlier by Judy Collins’ beautiful cover. Gifted with a hypnotic monotone voice, and an ability to sublimate despair, love and blues of the soul, Leonard Cohen is a genre in and of himself. A nonchalance coupled to a rather dark melancholy, touches of strings here, of choirs there, almost in the background, his entire universe, which may seem arid at first, requires our full attention and contemplation to be fully enjoyed… © MZ/Qobuz
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Pop/Rock - Released September 19, 2014 | Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Rock - Released December 11, 1995 | Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop/Rock - Released July 25, 2014 | Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Pop - Released November 22, 2019 | Columbia - Legacy

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From beyond the grave, Leonard Cohen has returned with Thanks for the Dance, three years after the amazing record You Want It Darker. His previous album contained fiercely determined lyrics (“I’m ready my Lord”) and that dark deep voice that makes your hairs stand on end, all layered over choir and organ melodies. Cohen died in the night nineteen days later, on November 7th 2016. But the singer already had plans for the afterlife: a posthumous album. He entrusted the task to his son Adam, who had been involved with the production of what everyone thought was the master’s final work. Adam commented: “I know my father’s sound very well and we had already discussed the arrangements during the recording sessions for You Want It Darker.” Gathering together the nine songs that were deliberately set aside, both solo and with guitar, Adam Cohen called upon his faithful colleagues for the accompaniments. “Despite everything, I went through a phase of doubt. So I decided to call on all the talented artists from the last album, starting with Javier Mas, the Spanish guitarist who accompanied my father on stage.” We find Feist, Beck (on guitar), Daniel Lanois, Damien Rice and Patrick Watson. The opus unfolds in a sober key – with just guitar, mandolin, piano and choir – and it is utterly moving throughout. We are treated to The Hills and its powerful build, the light percussion in The Night of Santiago, the dazzling brilliance of The Goal and a humble invitation to ponder life in Listen to the Hummingbird: “Listen to the Hummingbird, don’t listen to me” he sings in the closing song. But above all, it is the Canadian’s deep voice that serves as raw material, exploring all his favourite themes: loneliness, disappearance, humility, Jewishness. After the curtain fell on You Want It Darker, it’s time for the curtain call. Masterful. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Pop - Released October 22, 2002 | Columbia

The tracks on this two-CD, 31-song anthology, spanning Cohen's career from his 1967 debut album through 2002's Ten New Songs, were chosen by Cohen himself. It could thus be regarded as an accurate mirror of how Cohen sees his own career path and catalog highlights. And there are many of the songs you would expect from any decent Cohen retrospective: "Suzanne," "Sisters of Mercy," "So Long Marianne," "Bird on a Wire," "Famous Blue Raincoat," and "I'm You're Man," for instance. Still, the balance and selection isn't ideal. There's just one song ("Famous Blue Raincoat") from Songs of Love and Hate, and no songs at all from Death of a Ladies Man. Cohen's 1988-2002 period is arguably overrepresented, with about half of the package's tunes dating from that era. And because his later period is so prominently featured, most listeners won't be able to get around the fact that his voice declined in expressive range in the later years, and his material was less striking than his best early songs. Still, for those who've enjoyed Cohen all along, it's a good dose of much of his better work, and certainly doesn't skimp on the running time, with each of the discs lasting 78 minutes. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released November 28, 2014 | Columbia

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Pop - Released November 16, 2001 | Columbia - Legacy

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Rock - Released April 3, 2012 | Columbia - Legacy

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Folk - Released March 27, 2009 | Columbia

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Pop - Released April 3, 2012 | Columbia - Legacy

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Folk - Released September 10, 2010 | Columbia - Legacy

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Pop - Released April 10, 1990 | Columbia Nashville

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Leonard Cohen's first album was an unqualified triumph which announced the arrival of a bold and singular talent, and many who heard it must have wondered what Cohen could do for an encore. By comparison, Cohen's second album, 1969's Songs from a Room, was something of a letdown. While it's a fine LP, it ultimately feels neither as striking nor as assured as Songs of Leonard Cohen. Bob Johnston stepped in as producer for Songs from a Room, and his arrangements are simpler than those John Simon crafted for the debut, but they're also full of puzzling accents, such as the jew's harp that punctuates several tracks, the churchy organ line in "The Old Revolution," and the harsh synthesizer flourishes on "A Bunch of Lonesome Heroes." Johnston also had trouble coaxing strong vocal performances from Cohen; his singing here sounds tentative and his meter is uncertain, which regardless of how one feels about Cohen's much-debated vocal prowess is not the case with his other work. And finally, the quality of the songs on Songs from a Room is less consistent than on Songs of Leonard Cohen; as fine as "Bird on a Wire," "You Know Who I Am," "The Story of Isaac" and "Seems So Long Ago, Nancy" may be, "The Butcher" and "A Bunch of Lonesome Heroes" simply aren't up to his usual standards. Despite the album's flaws, Songs from a Room's strongest moments convey a naked intimacy and fearless emotional honesty that's every bit as powerful as the debut, and it left no doubt that Cohen was a major creative force in contemporary songwriting. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Pop - Released April 3, 2012 | Columbia - Legacy

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Pop/Rock - Released April 3, 2012 | Columbia - Legacy

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Folk - Released October 26, 2004 | Columbia

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There is an air of finality on Leonard Cohen's Dear Heather. Cohen, who turned 70 in September of 2004, offers no air of personal mortality -- thank God; may this elegant Canadian bard of the holy and profane live forever. It nonetheless looks back -- to teachers, lovers, and friends -- and celebrates life spent in the process of actually living it. The album's bookend tracks provide some evidence: Lord Byron's bittersweet "Go No More A-Roving," set to music and sung by Cohen and Sharon Robinson (and dedicated to Cohen's ailing mentor, Irving Layton), and a beautifully crafted reading of country music's greatest lost love song, "Tennessee Waltz." Cohen's voice is even quieter, almost whispering, nearly sepulchral. The tone of the album is mellow, hushed, nocturnal. Its instrumentation is drenched in the beat nightclub atmospherics of Ten New Songs: trippy, skeletal R&B and pop and Casio keyboard- and beatbox-propelled rhythm tracks are graced by brushed drums, spectral saxophones, and vibes, along with an all but imperceptible acoustic guitar lilting sleepily through it all. But this doesn't get it, because there's so much more than this, too. That said, Dear Heather is Cohen's most upbeat offering. Rather than focus on loss as an end, it looks upon experience as something to be accepted as a portal to wisdom and gratitude. Women permeate these songs both literally and metaphorically. Robinson, who collaborated with Cohen last time, is here, but so is Anjani Thomas. Leanne Ungar also lends production help. Cohen blatantly sums up his amorous life in "Because Of": "Because of a few songs/Wherein I spoke of their mystery/Women have been exceptionally kind to my old age/They make a secret place/In their busy lives/And they say, 'Look at me, Leonard/Look at me one last time.'" "The Letters," written with Robinson, who sings in duet, is a case in point, reflecting on a past love who has been "Reading them again/The ones you didn't burn/You press them to your lips/My pages of concern...The wounded forms appear/The loss, the full extent/And simple kindness here/The solitude of strength." "On That Day" is a deeply compassionate meditation on the violence of September 11 where he asks the question: "Did you go crazy/Or did you report/On that day...." It is followed by the spoken poem "A Villanelle for Our Time," with words by Cohen's late professor Frank Scott that transform these experiences into hope. "We rise to play a greater part/The lesser loyalties depart/And neither race nor creed remain/From bitter searching of the heart...." On "There for You," with Robinson, Cohen digs even deeper into the well, telling an old lover that no matter the end result of their love, he was indeed there, had shown up, he was accountable and is grateful. Cohen quotes his own first book, The Spice Box of Earth, to pay tribute to the late poet A.M. Klein. "Tennessee Waltz" is indeed a sad, sad song, but it is given balance in Cohen's elegant, cheerful delivery. If this is indeed his final offering as a songwriter, it is a fine, decent, and moving way to close this chapter of the book of his life. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Folk - Released April 23, 1987 | Columbia

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Pop/Rock - Released July 25, 2014 | Columbia - Legacy

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Leonard Cohen in the magazine