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Pop - Released October 16, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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At 36 years old, the queen of the romantic, sophisticated ballad has released her 8th album, simply named Album no.8. While the title is minimal, the means in which the work was produced are far from it. Here, Katie Melua is joined by the Georgian Philharmonic Orchestra. The collaboration is rather apt considering the British singer’s Georgian origins. The strings serve as a luxurious backdrop to these often-autobiographical songs which cover subjects from the end of a loving relationship (A Love Like That, Airtime), to a journey she took with her father in the Caucasus mountains (Leaving the Mountain). The orchestra is present on each of the tracks but by no means does it squander the delicacy of the songs. Especially when some soloists (sax, piano, guitar…) or even a funky and jazzy rhythmic section occasionally drop in to lighten up the proceedings (Voices in the night). Producer Leo Abrahams did the arrangements on the album which sometimes evoke the finesse of Nick Drake or the contemplative emotion of John Barry. We also find an homage to the choreographer Pina Buasch, cowritten with Zurab, Katie’s brother (Maybe I Dreamt It), a tender evocation of the singer’s childhood (Heading Home), and also the very seductive English Manner, the portrait of a love triangle, unveiling a more colourful aspect to Katie Melua’s art. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Pop - Released October 5, 2018 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

This 33-track collection brings together some of Katie Melua's finest moments. Included are the U.K. Top 40 singles "Nine Million Bicycles," "Call Off the Search," and "The Closest Thing to Crazy," as well as two newly recorded covers, "Diamonds Are Forever" and "Bridge Over Troubled Water," which features the Georgian Philharmonic Orchestra. © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Pop - Released December 13, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

The primary feeling elicited from this live recording by Katie Melua is one of absolute sincerity, thanks to the autobiographical nature of the programme. Recorded in December 2018 at the Westminster Central Hall, the album opens with a traditional Georgian folk song (her country of origin), Tu Ase Turpa Ikavi, before following with Plane Song in which the singer describes her arrival in Northern Ireland (her adoptive country) in 1993. In the space of a few minutes, Katie Melua manages to take us through her journey charged with raw emotion. Accompanied by only a guitar, a piano and a discreet rhythm section, the singer has the power to showcase her velvety voice as well as the quality of her songwriting which blend pop and folk music. Of course, she performs hits like Nine Million Bicycles and The Closest Thing to Crazy, but there are a couple of surprises, like the cover of The Cure’s Just Like Heaven or What A Wonderful World. By slowing down the tempo of Louis Armstrong’s classic and joining forces with the Gori Women’s choir (who feature on several other songs from the album), Katie Melua imbues a relaxed ambience in the London concert hall. If we’re still talking about covers, we should mention the vibrant All-Night Vigil - Nunc Dimittis (a Russian religious song composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff in 1915) and Fields of Gold by Sting. It appears that Katie Melua enjoys plunging herself into as wide an array of genres as possible, but thanks to her melancholic voice and radiant sensitivity, she nevertheless manages to instil a sense of unity to this magical concert. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Pop - Released September 26, 2005 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

Georgia-born (as in the country, not the state) singer/songwriter Katie Melua found herself atop the British charts in 2003 with her breezy debut, Call Off the Search, which sold over three million copies in Europe alone. Her laid-back blend of blues, jazz, and pop with a kiss of worldbeat drew comparisons to Norah Jones, and rightfully so. She sticks to the formula on her lush, ultimately safe follow-up, Piece by Piece. This is Coldplay for the Diana Krall crowd, a perfectly rendered slice of adult contemporary pie for a lazy summer day delivered by an artist whose beautiful voice is almost striking in how unremarkable it is. Her longtime collaborator, producer/songwriter Mike Batt, provides the catchiest number, an odd and endearing little confection called "Nine Million Bicycles." It's both silly and sweet, two things that work in Melua's favor. Sure, she can vamp it up with the best of them on bluesy asides like "Shy Boy" and the dreadful "Blues in the Night," but there's a whole lot of innocence in that voice that just shrivels in the midst of all that bravado. Only in her early twenties, Melua's got plenty of time to decide on a persona, and Piece by Piece has enough quality material on it to placate fans until she does, but there's some tension here, and it doesn't sound intentional. Besides, anyone who covers Canned Heat and the Cure on the same record is still trying to figure it all out. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 14, 2016 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd.

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Pop - Released March 5, 2012 | Dramatico Entertainment Ltd

Apropos of nothing, Georgian-born chanteuse Katie Melua surprised everyone with 2010's The House by hooking up with William Orbit and fusing her familiar brand of coffee table jazz-pop with flourishes of subtle electronica. Perhaps concerned that it failed to top the charts like her previous three records, the 27-year-old has reverted to type for its follow-up, Secret Symphony, by returning to mentor Mike Batt, the former Wombles songwriter responsible for her incredible early success. It's a disappointing and frustrating retreat back to safety. Melua's distinctive velvety vocals were always more intriguing than the so-laid-back-they're-horizontal arrangements which surrounded them, but her last effort was an encouraging sign that she could leave her usual dinner party background music firmly behind. And while Batt's contributions here -- such as the drowsy lounge pop of "The Bit That I Don't Get," the steel-laden country balladry of "The Walls of the World," and the yearning, string-soaked title track -- are all typically elegant, demure, and understated affairs, they're so overly polite and ultimately anodyne, they make Eva Cassidy sound like a death metal act. If any more evidence were needed that Batt appears to be restricting her talents, Melua is far more captivating on the self-penned chamber pop of "Forgetting All My Troubles," and the four cover versions included, from the soaring torch song reworking of Ron Sexsmith's "Gold in Them Hills," to the double bass-led shuffle treatment of Fran Healy's "Moonshine," to the straightforward rendition of Françoise Hardy's sultry chanson "All Over the World." Secret Symphony is therefore not without its charms, but ultimately it's a clear step backwards from an artist who appeared to be overcoming her notable lack of edge. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 3, 2003 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

English listeners went mad for Katie Melua with the release of her debut album in late 2003. Issued domestically in June 2004, Call Off the Search posits the lovely Melua pristinely in between pop, adult contemporary, and traditional American musical forms, with savvy marketing handling the finishing touches. (Think Norah Jones.) It's a comfortable, lightly melodic affair that drinks red wine safely in the middle of the road. Raised in Soviet Georgia and the United Kingdom, Melua has a beguiling accent that colors the ends of her phrases, adding character to her velvety, if occasionally only satisfactory singing voice. She has a nice time with the understated R&B sashay of John Mayall's "Crawling Up a Hill," as well as Mike Batt's "My Aphrodisiac Is You," which is spiced up with barrelhouse piano, muted trumpet, and sly references to opium and the Kama Sutra. The singer's own "Belfast (Penguins and Cats)" opens nicely with a few measures of solo acoustic guitar before it's joined by the orchestral maneuvers that sweep through the majority of Call Off the Search's after-dark cabaret. (Melua also penned a dedication to Eva Cassidy, who she's been compared to vocally.) While the instrumentation is never overbearing, a stoic version of Randy Newman's "I Think It's Going to Rain Today" and a couple of late-album pop vocal entries do dawdle a bit in the soft-focus halo that hovers over Search's more easygoing stretches. These selections are perfectly capable, yet pretty obvious, as if the decision was made to sprinkle Melua's debut equally with safety and variety, in case a particular style didn't stick. Still, despite a few detours down easy street, Call Off the Search is a promising debut, and comfortable like the first drink of the evening. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 25, 2010 | Dramatico Entertainment Ltd

Vocalist Katie Melua's 2010 album The House is an atmospheric, romantic, and sometimes eerie album of arty adult alternative pop. While longtime producer Mike Batt is on board here, journeyman electronic producer William Orbit takes the main production helm. The result is Melua's most mature album to date and one that will certainly draw well-earned comparisons to such art pop icons as Kate Bush and Tori Amos. And while immaculately produced tracks like "The Flood" and "Twisted" do evince Bush's literate and operatic sound, they also bring to mind the grand, retro-leaning approach of guitarist/singer-songwriter Richard Hawley. Which isn't to say that Melua hews closely to any kind of '60s pop; on the contrary, these are clearly contemporary songs with a modern point of view. But there is a bit of moody Nick Drake-style guitar work and the way the songs build and swoop, often with symphonic backing (the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra appears here), is very much in keeping with Hawley's particular Brill Building meets coastal British town grandeur. In that sense, the album is a bit of a grower and has an overall soft, reflective quality. As with most of The House, songs like the folk-inflected opener "I'd Love to Kill You," the Eastern-tinged "The Flood," and the yearning and pretty "Red Balloons," take time to build and grab you slowly with deft, biting lyrics and Melua's lilting, burnished vocals. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 18, 2009 | Dramatico Entertainment Ltd

Recorded in the fall of 2008 at London’s massive O2 Arena, this concert album presents alt-pop singer-songwriter Katie Melua performing many of her signature tunes. In addition to playing intelligent, emotive songs such as “If You Were a Sailboat” and “Nine Million Bicycles,” Melua also touches on her Georgian roots with “Kviteli Potlebi (Yellow Leaves),” a folk number that points to her international appeal. © TiVo
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Pop - Released August 28, 2015 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd.

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Pop - Released October 16, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

At 36 years old, the queen of the romantic, sophisticated ballad has released her 8th album, simply named Album no.8. While the title is minimal, the means in which the work was produced are far from it. Here, Katie Melua is joined by the Georgian Philharmonic Orchestra. The collaboration is rather apt considering the British singer’s Georgian origins. The strings serve as a luxurious backdrop to these often-autobiographical songs which cover subjects from the end of a loving relationship (A Love Like That, Airtime), to a journey she took with her father in the Caucasus mountains (Leaving the Mountain). The orchestra is present on each of the tracks but by no means does it squander the delicacy of the songs. Especially when some soloists (sax, piano, guitar…) or even a funky and jazzy rhythmic section occasionally drop in to lighten up the proceedings (Voices in the night). Producer Leo Abrahams did the arrangements on the album which sometimes evoke the finesse of Nick Drake or the contemplative emotion of John Barry. We also find an homage to the choreographer Pina Buasch, cowritten with Zurab, Katie’s brother (Maybe I Dreamt It), a tender evocation of the singer’s childhood (Heading Home), and also the very seductive English Manner, the portrait of a love triangle, unveiling a more colourful aspect to Katie Melua’s art. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Pop - Released December 3, 2012 | Dramatico Entertainment Ltd

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Pop - Released November 10, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

A gorgeously rendered holiday-themed effort, In Winter finds singer/songwriter Katie Melua backed by the 25-member Gori Women's Choir. The album is Melua's seventh studio production and first since parting ways with longtime collaborator Mike Batt. Recorded in her native country of Georgia (Melua left with her parents at age nine), In Winter is a lushly produced, thoughtfully conceived album featuring arrangements by esteemed choral composer Bob Chilcott. An acclaimed institution, the Gori Women's Choir are famous for their haunting classical harmonies. They prove a superb match for Melua, who both sings along with the choir and frames herself against its angelic, delicately layered harmonies. Although the album is technically a holiday-themed work, it's not a cheery collection of Yuletide favorites. Instead, Melua delivers a handful of ruminative and lyrical originals, many inspired by her memories of growing up in what was then the Soviet Union, as well as the complex and often heartbreaking history of Georgia's civil war. She also weaves in several well-curated covers, including poignant renditions of Joni Mitchell's "River," Sergey Rachmaninov's "All-Night Vigil-Nunc Dimittis," and the hymn "O Holy Night." Melua even finds room to sing in Ukrainian, opening the album with a magical rendition of the traditional song "The Little Swallow," whose melody is better recognized to Western audiences as "The Carol of the Bells." These are warmly arranged, beautifully executed recordings that capture the stark, introspective beauty of a rural Eastern Europe in winter. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 26, 2010 | Dramatico Entertainment

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Pop - Released May 15, 2009 | Dramatico

Recorded in the fall of 2008 at London’s massive O2 Arena, this concert album presents alt-pop singer-songwriter Katie Melua performing many of her signature tunes. In addition to playing intelligent, emotive songs such as “If You Were a Sailboat” and “Nine Million Bicycles,” Melua also touches on her Georgian roots with “Kviteli Potlebi (Yellow Leaves),” a folk number that points to her international appeal. © TiVo
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Pop - Released September 26, 2005 | Dramatico

Georgia-born (as in the country, not the state) singer/songwriter Katie Melua found herself atop the British charts in 2003 with her breezy debut, Call Off the Search, which sold over three million copies in Europe alone. Her laid-back blend of blues, jazz, and pop with a kiss of worldbeat drew comparisons to Norah Jones, and rightfully so. She sticks to the formula on her lush, ultimately safe follow-up, Piece by Piece. This is Coldplay for the Diana Krall crowd, a perfectly rendered slice of adult contemporary pie for a lazy summer day delivered by an artist whose beautiful voice is almost striking in how unremarkable it is. Her longtime collaborator, producer/songwriter Mike Batt, provides the catchiest number, an odd and endearing little confection called "Nine Million Bicycles." It's both silly and sweet, two things that work in Melua's favor. Sure, she can vamp it up with the best of them on bluesy asides like "Shy Boy" and the dreadful "Blues in the Night," but there's a whole lot of innocence in that voice that just shrivels in the midst of all that bravado. Only in her early twenties, Melua's got plenty of time to decide on a persona, and Piece by Piece has enough quality material on it to placate fans until she does, but there's some tension here, and it doesn't sound intentional. Besides, anyone who covers Canned Heat and the Cure on the same record is still trying to figure it all out. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 1, 2007 | Dramatico

With a voice that sounds like a more mainstream version of the late jazz cult superstar Eva Cassidy and smoky raven-haired looks to rival a movie lot's worth of young ingénues, it's a bit of a surprise that Katie Melua has remained so unknown in the United States, despite the chart success the Eastern European-born songstress has achieved in her adopted home of the United Kingdom. It seems like she should be at least as popular as, say, Regina Spektor or Nellie McKay. Pictures may not help that much, however, because in comparison to its fairly straightforward jazz-tinged singer/songwriter predecessors, Melua's third album takes a bit of a left turn into the self-consciously quirky. It's a wonder that it took so long, because Melua's producer and part-time songwriter is Mike Batt, a minor legend of the U.K. music scene who has fashioned a decades-long career out of deliberate eccentricity. Much of Pictures sounds like Batt is reverting to his '70s children's music productions for the Wombles, especially "Mary Pickford (Used to Eat Roses)," a horrifyingly cutesy song about the early days of Hollywood royalty; "Scary Films," a thinly disguised cop of early Kate Bush tracks like "Hammer Horror" and "Wow," and the fake reggae "Ghost Town," which sounds like Batt experimenting with getting as close to ripping off the Specials' classic of the same name without veering into actual plagiarism. The closer Melua comes to restrained adult pop, like the unexpectedly touching Batt-penned torch ballad "What It Says on the Tin," and the gently swaying, Everything But the Girl-like bossa nova bounce of "Perfect Circle," the better the album is. The songs written by Melua by herself and/or with lyricist Molly McQueen are uniformly stronger than Batt's contributions, particularly the intimate, smoky "Spellbound," suggesting that leaving her mentor would do Katie Melua a world of good. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 3, 2003 | Dramatico

English listeners went mad for Katie Melua with the release of her debut album in late 2003. Issued domestically in June 2004, Call Off the Search posits the lovely Melua pristinely in between pop, adult contemporary, and traditional American musical forms, with savvy marketing handling the finishing touches. (Think Norah Jones.) It's a comfortable, lightly melodic affair that drinks red wine safely in the middle of the road. Raised in Soviet Georgia and the United Kingdom, Melua has a beguiling accent that colors the ends of her phrases, adding character to her velvety, if occasionally only satisfactory singing voice. She has a nice time with the understated R&B sashay of John Mayall's "Crawling Up a Hill," as well as Mike Batt's "My Aphrodisiac Is You," which is spiced up with barrelhouse piano, muted trumpet, and sly references to opium and the Kama Sutra. The singer's own "Belfast (Penguins and Cats)" opens nicely with a few measures of solo acoustic guitar before it's joined by the orchestral maneuvers that sweep through the majority of Call Off the Search's after-dark cabaret. (Melua also penned a dedication to Eva Cassidy, who she's been compared to vocally.) While the instrumentation is never overbearing, a stoic version of Randy Newman's "I Think It's Going to Rain Today" and a couple of late-album pop vocal entries do dawdle a bit in the soft-focus halo that hovers over Search's more easygoing stretches. These selections are perfectly capable, yet pretty obvious, as if the decision was made to sprinkle Melua's debut equally with safety and variety, in case a particular style didn't stick. Still, despite a few detours down easy street, Call Off the Search is a promising debut, and comfortable like the first drink of the evening. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Pop - Released June 30, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Blues - Released October 31, 2006 | Calvin

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Katie Melua in the magazine
  • Katie Melua live from London
    Katie Melua live from London Accompanied by the Gori Women's Choir, the British singer's live album is an enchanting journey throughout her life, and offers a few surprise covers along the way (The Cure, Louis Armstrong...).