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Trance - Released | Metropolis Records

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Electronic - Released | Metropolis Records

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Trance - Released July 12, 2011 | Metropolis Records

Industrial music, as it emerged in the 1980s, has very often carried with it an unpleasant whiff of fascism: jackboot beats, faintly German accents (often affected), Wagnerian choral snippets, sometimes explicitly Nazi-derived stage costumes. Ben Watkins, recording with a shifting cast of collaborators as Juno Reactor, has generally skirted these tendencies, in part by working with a broad stylistic palette that includes elements of trip-hop, world music, and trance; in fact, although his releases are often found in the "Industrial" bin, his music has always fit that category rather poorly. The remix artists invited to provide new interpretations of Juno Reactor tracks for this collection reflect Watkins' catholicity of taste: there are mixes by MIDIval PunditZ, Perfect Stranger, Bombay Dub Orchestra, and Uber Tmar, among others, and although the rhythms do tend to coalesce around a certain jackboot-house theme (and there are occasional appearances by a rather Teutonic-sounding choir), there's quite a bit of rhythmic and textural variety. Highlights include Bombay Dub Orchestra's Middle Eastern-funk-reggae take on "Pistolero," Thomas P. Karni's hard and spare treatment of "Zwara," and the cool but jittery MIDIval PunditZ mix of "Navras." Less interesting are Dino Psaras' blocky and predictable mix on "Guardian Angel" and Perfect Stranger's tedious industrial-house take on "Rotorblade." This collection will be welcomed by established fans, but may not be the best introduction to Juno Reactor for newcomers. ~ Rick Anderson

Techno - Released | Metropolis Records

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Electronic - Released June 1, 1995 | Barbarians Inc

Whether you believed Goa trance was the LSD-inspired wave of the future or just another bastardization of third-world culture, Juno Reactor has been plunging forward as if they don't care how close the genre could come to disaster. This might be a good time for the band to get a devil's advocate implanted inside their heads. Beyond the Infinite offers more of the east meets west dance sentiments thrown together in a surprisingly tiresome manner and its overall feeling of flipped-out exclusivity damages any of the band's mighty aspirations. "Silver" can have all the sitar friendliness to satisfy those prone to psychedelics, "Magnetic" nods along to the twirling excesses of an outdated pre-jungle beat, yet these efforts make the sober listener simply feel left out of a loop. It doesn't make things easier that the band has yet to choose which path to take. In "Samurai," for example (the track used in promoting Arnold Schwarzenegger's Eraser), there is more of a Photek-like, oriental focus on techno-trance operations than ever before. Which is an interesting new attempt; even though it feels stilted, confused, and just an excuse to steal the keyboards from the Cure's "A Forest." With its mystified sense of native adoration and tiring execution, Beyond the Infinite is an album signifying a band at a crossroads. They've now exposed about five musical directions to take, and it might take less (or more) drugs to show which path is the correct one. ~ Dean Carlson
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Trance - Released September 23, 2008 | Metropolis Records

Transmissions leads off with Juno Reactor's biggest club hit to date, "High Energy Protons," a curious track that translates three-chord heavy metal through some 303 acid with a few suitably trippy vocals. The rest of the album has more of the same, alternately spacy or psychedelic. It's occasionally reminiscent of the Orb's ambient-dub, especially on the astronaut-sampling "Luna-Tic." ~ John Bush
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Trance - Released August 12, 2019 | Blue Tunes Records

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Trance - Released October 26, 2004 | Metropolis Records

Juno Reactor are best known for their over the top cinematic trance epics utilized in equally overwrought action adventure films like The Matrix: Reloaded and The Matrix: Revolution, and the sweeping strings that open their sixth full-length album in just over a decade instigate a familiar rush for those who like their adventure administered with a fair amount of sci-fi/fantasy flair. But the warm-up of "Conquistador I" is so long, as it pulls back from digital orchestration to ethnic guitar meandering, that when the industrial-techno stomp of "Conquistador II" finally kicks in, it is almost jarring. It is also one of the few moments that Juno Reactor isn't kicking video game butt, as "Giant" hits even harder with Reece basslines pilfered from the darker side of jungle and "War Dogs" fully warps into an electronic metal band, albeit one with some kitchy world music leanings. This all-genre stomp of course finds its apex in "Mona Lisa Overdrive" and "Navaras," the two tracks taken from the Matrix films, remixed here but still shameless in their cathartic orchestral epiphanies. Only the dirge of "Angels and Men" offers reprieve for an entire song, although blaze-and-smolder dynamics are one of the group's specialties throughout. Those who loved Juno Reactor for their hyperdrive psychedelic trance of yore may or may not appreciate this direction taken in earnest since 2000's Shango. But perhaps a new generation raised on Xbox adrenalin blasts can handle the shock'n'awe. ~ Joshua Glazer
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Electronic - Released November 14, 2005 | Barbarians Inc

Goodbye Goa, hello world. The members of Juno Reactor seem to have made a decision here as to what they wanted to do when they grew up, with the answer being, interestingly, Art of Noise for the 21st century coupled with atmospheric merging with world music elements from all over the planet. There are mammoth sounds at hand -- deep, dark moods, moments of widescreen cinema -- and much clever subtlety. With "Pistolero" alone -- a mad blend of samples, beats, effects, and flamenco guitar from Steve Stevens -- Juno Reactor has leapt away from the past and into a more imaginative future. The only question now is whether or not they can keep up this kind of growth, and whether that means continuing to work with live musicians or expanding their tonal and rhythmic space. Either way, Shango is a benchmark for the duo. ~ Steven E. McDonald
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Trance - Released August 5, 2008 | Metropolis Records

All too often, techno recordings that sounded exciting in the clubs of the late '80s and early to late '90s didn't hold up well at home, where their limitations became quite obvious. Bible of Dreams, on the other hand, is interesting both on and off the dancefloor. Instead of simply concerning itself with the number of beats per minute it can provide, Juno Reactor delivers trance to sit down and listen to. The mostly instrumental material (though with scattered soundbites and samples) is varied, and the group fuses trance with everything from Middle Eastern music ("God Is God") to heavy metal ("Swamp Thing"). ~ Alex Henderson
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Trance - Released April 22, 2008 | Metropolis Records

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Trance - Released October 17, 2000 | Metropolis Records

Goodbye Goa, hello world. The members of Juno Reactor seem to have made a decision here as to what they wanted to do when they grew up, with the answer being, interestingly, Art of Noise for the 21st century coupled with atmospheric merging with world music elements from all over the planet. There are mammoth sounds at hand -- deep, dark moods, moments of widescreen cinema -- and much clever subtlety. With "Pistolero" alone -- a mad blend of samples, beats, effects, and flamenco guitar from Steve Stevens -- Juno Reactor has leapt away from the past and into a more imaginative future. The only question now is whether or not they can keep up this kind of growth, and whether that means continuing to work with live musicians or expanding their tonal and rhythmic space. Either way, Shango is a benchmark for the duo. ~ Steven E. McDonald
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Dance - Released April 22, 2008 | Barbarians Inc

Trance - Released | Metropolis Records

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Electronic - Released June 1, 1996 | Barbarians Inc

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Trance - Released November 14, 2000 | Metropolis Records

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Electronic - Released June 1, 1994 | Barbarians Inc

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Electronic - Released May 28, 2018 | Hommega Productions

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Trance - Released September 9, 2008 | Metropolis Records

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Trance - Released July 10, 2001 | Metropolis Records