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Classical - Released January 7, 2013 | Alia Vox

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released March 24, 2014 | Satirino Records

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica

Classical - Released October 23, 2012 | Aeolus

Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio - La Clef du mois RESMUSICA
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Classical - Released March 3, 2014 | Coro

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
For his performances of Bach's so-called Lutheran masses, short mass settings of just Kyrie and Gloria, the version of the choral group the Sixteen delivered by conductor Harry Christophers really ought to be called the Eight. Christophers moves in the direction of the popular one-voice-per-part performance concept for Bach but does not fully embrace it; instead there are two voices per part, with the soloists drawn from the ranks of the choir. It's a reasonable compromise, and it does bring out a considerable amount of instrumental detail. In something like the big opening chorus of the Cantata No. 79, "Gott der Herr ist Sonn' und Schild" (BWV 79), the choir represents a dramatic fall-off in dynamics, but Christophers generally gets a surprisingly full sound out of his choristers. That cantata is included because, as on the first volume of the Sixteen's pair devoted to the Lutheran masses, it was raided by Bach for material. Most of the music in the Lutheran masses is recycled, which may account for their comparative lack of popularity, but to downgrade them is to misunderstand Bach's musical world, and there's considerable interest in the way German-language cantata texts were adapted for this remnant of Catholic ritual. Christophers is not a Bach conductor on the level of Suzuki or John Eliot Gardiner, and there can be a sweetness that grates. But both the overall concept and the execution are solid, and the soloists, with male altos, are generally impressive. Fans of the Sixteen may well wish to check out this new direction in the popular group's career. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 3, 2008 | Avie Records

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
After recording J.S. Bach's Brandenburg Concertos to near perfection with the English Concert in 1982, it might seem redundant for Trevor Pinnock to try his hand at them again in this 2007 set with the European Brandenburg Ensemble. Allowing for certain variables of interpretation and execution between the two versions, which should be expected at a remove of 25 years, one can still expect Pinnock to turn in elegant period readings that don't diverge too dramatically from his earlier recordings on Archiv. On this exquisite set, released by Avie -- a label that lets its artists take creative risks that many major labels won't -- Pinnock explores the Brandenburgs with considerable freedom and inventiveness, particularly in adjusting the size of his ensemble according to acoustical needs, and in his employment of musicians from several different countries and performing backgrounds. To the trained ear, these concertos have a slightly darker coloration, due to the tuning at A415, and some experts may detect where the high- or low-tone violones are used in substitution for the standard cello or double bass. Yet to most listeners, these performances won't sound experimental or daring, since the changes are wholly appropriate to the Baroque era, when instrumentation and other practices varied in almost every performance. Yet in terms of expression, this set may seem a little richer, warmer, and a bit more relaxed than its predecessor, and the ensemble's presence is almost palpable in the close-up, highly detailed reproduction. Anyone who already owns the earlier recordings may feel this attempt is "gilding the lily," but Pinnock's second traversal of the Brandenburgs is definitely worth hearing, and is highly recommended to others who need a terrific version, by any standard. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 20, 2007 | Challenge Classics

Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released September 10, 2014 | Passacaille

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released April 1, 2016 | Avie Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
Rachel Barton Pine has often performed the Sonatas and Partitas of Johann Sebastian Bach in recital, but her 2016 release on Avie is her first studio recording of this essential masterwork for violinists. Using a Baroque bow on a modernized 1742 Guarneri de Gesù violin, Pine plays the Sonatas and Partitas with crisp accentuation, transparent voicing, and a warm tone, much as she does in her concert performances. Her interpretation, which is influenced by period practices but not limited by them, offers clear counterpoint in the sonatas and buoyant dance rhythms in the partitas, and there is little scratchiness in her stopped chords to disrupt the smoothness and transparency of her elegant lines. Pine's depth of feeling and expressive insights into the music keep it from seeming like dry, technical exercises, yet there is none of the overly rhetorical Romantic approach here, either, so this reading does justice to Bach's likely intentions while communicating emotion in a subtle and tasteful manner. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Classical - Released August 25, 2015 | Passacaille

Booklet Distinctions 3F de Télérama
« Her performance has commitment, clarity and a Leonhardt-like care over note placement. » (Lindsay Kemp, Gramophone Magazine, april 2016)  
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Classical - Released July 15, 2012 | Claves Records

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Claves Records

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released October 7, 2011 | Evil Penguin Classic

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Chamber Music - Released June 18, 2013 | Wigmore Hall Live

Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
Recorded live on May 5, 2012, at Wigmore Hall, Colin Carr's recording of J.S. Bach's six Cello Suites is a remarkable demonstration of intellectual concentration, expressive consistency, and physical control that other cellists may envy. Carr's approach to these masterworks is straightforward and deeply personal, following neither historical nor modern schools of interpretation but flowing directly from his own expression in the moment. Because there are no convenient catchwords to apply to his playing, it is perhaps best to think that this is one man's vision of the suites as profound sources of inspiration, and as opportunities to show music's power to affect emotions through the subtlest means available. Carr has clearly mastered these works through incessant practice, so he can focus on playing the suites with a continuous, nuanced line, as well as with an acute sense of the counterpoint implied within the melodies. The results are penetrating interpretations that feel completely organic and whole, and one may listen to both discs in one sitting, feeling that the time has barely passed, so absorbing is Carr's playing. The reproduction is quite clean and clear for a live recording, and there are comparatively few audience sounds apart from the enthusiastic applause. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 20, 2007 | Challenge Classics

Ton Koopman has recorded Bach's St. Matthew Passion twice, and in many ways, he seems to have changed his mind about the work. His 1992 recording for Erato was, for an original instrument/historically informed performance, large in scale, broad in scope, dramatic in execution, and heavy in sound. This, his 2005 recording for Antonie Marchand, is likewise an original instrument/historically informed performance, but it is more intimate in scale, more concentrated in scope, and lighter in sound. But, even with these changes, Koopman's second Matthew Passion is not only still dramatic in execution, it is far more dramatic in execution, and thus in its way even more compelling. Musically, both performances are superb. Both times, Koopman uses his Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra & Choir, a strong and supple instrument completely responsive to his direction, but the later recording's smaller-sized ensemble makes the music sound just as colorful but clearer and more light-filled. Except for bass Klaus Mertens, Koopman uses entirely different but equally effective soloists for each recording, but with slightly quicker tempos and more pointed recitatives, the later soloists are much more dramatically effective. Koopman's interpretation has not fundamentally changed -- clearly, he still views the work as the most sublime and transcendent sacred musical work in the history of humanity, a view both performances are highly persuasive in arguing -- but he here seems to view the work as all that plus a compelling drama. For listeners who grew up with the Karajan or Solti recordings of Bach's St. Matthew Passion, the idea of an original instrument/ istorically informed performance being described as large, broad, or heavy may seem unlikely, and they are advised to seek out Koopman's 1992 recording for evidence to the contrary. But for listeners who already accept original instrument/historically informed performances and who are looking for a recording that emphasizes the work's dramatic qualities, the 2005 Koopman is the one to hear. © TiVo

Classical - Released October 15, 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Classical - Released January 1, 1982 | Mezhdunarodnaya Kniga Musica

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Classical - Released October 14, 2016 | Claves Records

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released March 10, 2017 | Groupe Analekta, Inc

Hi-Res Booklet

Classical - Released August 3, 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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