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Rock - Released July 24, 2001 | Interscope

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 18, 2019 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released October 19, 2004 | Interscope

The massive success of Jimmy Eat World's 2001 Bleed American propelled the band into the mass-culture spotlight, with the hit single "The Middle" seemingly popping up in every third movie released and the group turning in an energized performance on Saturday Night Live. Many, many groups followed in their wake, crafting a similar blend of melodic, anguished punk-pop and leaving Jimmy Eat World in the position of crafting a follow-up that set them apart from their acolytes. Futures gets around this dilemma in two ways. First, with the help of producer Gil Norton, the band polishes its sound until it shines like a slick '70s arena rock record. The guitars are stacked like thick diamonds, the vocals are way out front and buttressed by sweet harmonies in the choruses, the drums sound large, and the mix is loaded with sweetening from acoustic guitars, keyboards, and female vocals. In the process, they sacrificed the immediacy of the previous record, but they gained an epic and weighty feel. Secondly, the lyrics are much darker and more mature, including themes that revolve around politics, drugs, and despair. The piano-and-feedback ballad "Drugs or Me" and the bittersweet love song "Night Drive" are the products of age and experience the band lacked until now. The best song on the record, the very Disintegration-era Cure-sounding "23," seems like it was recorded by a different group entirely. Some things have remained the same, however. Jim Adkins' vocals are as intense and heart-tugging as ever, and the band still writes hooks that will have you singing along before the song is half over. "Just Tonight," "Futures," and the AC/DC-sampling "Pain" are all trademark Jimmy Eat World punky pop/rockers with anthemic choruses, while "The World You Love" and "Work" display the sweetly melodic side of the band. There are a couple of stumbles (the decision to replace Petra Haden's charming vocals with Liz Phair's, the generic "Nothingwrong"), but they don't detract from the overall power of the record. Futures will most likely not be the sensation that Bleed American was -- it is too dark and inwardly focused for that -- but it shows a progression of sound and emotion that fans of the band should embrace. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2007 | Capitol Records

Booklet
On the heels of their self-titled EP in late 1998, Jimmy Eat World released their breakthrough album Clarity in 1999 and took up the mantle of emo poster boys. Deftly produced by Mark Trombino and the band, Clarity mixes introspective balladry with power-chord punk rock, elements of chamber pop, and subtle doses of electronica to create a remarkably unique album. The only single to garner radio play, the hard-edged yet poppy "Lucky Denver Mint," was also featured on the soundtrack to the Drew Barrymore film Never Been Kissed, and while the album reached an audience that far surpassed Jimmy Eat World's previous efforts, it was by no means a commercial smash hit. The band's punk influences are evident on "Your New Aesthetic," which decries the commercialization of radio as effectively as any song since Elvis Costello's "Radio, Radio." The other songs are more personal and poignant. Using string ensembles, drum loops, chimes, piano, vibraphones, and tight vocal harmonies to create intricately layered songs, Clarity alternates between hypnotic and hard rock, often in the same song. The snarl of "Blister" and "Crush" are counterbalanced by the understated beauty of "Table for Glasses" and "On a Sunday." However, most of the tracks mix both ends of the emotional spectrum with dramatic effects. The sweeping "Goodbye Sky Harbor," which clocks in at an epic sixteen-minutes-and-eleven seconds, starts off as an up-tempo romp, but evolves into an expansive piece of dream pop that includes vocal loops, several layers of delicate electric guitars, bells, and a drum machine. Heartfelt, yearning vocals from Jim Adkins and Tom Linton tie the songs on Clarity together and set them apart from other post-grunge rock acts. Neither vocalist is afraid to wear his heart on his sleeve, but both pull it off without sounding wimpy or overly forlorn. They are also versatile enough to belt out the more aggressive tunes. Trombino also deserves praise for helping to brilliantly balance excellent songwriting and traditional rock elements with adventurous production and unique instrumentation. © Mark Vanderhoff /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 21, 2016 | RCA Records Label

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2010 | Interscope

It’s been 16 years since Jimmy Eat World released Static Prevails, one of the first emo albums issued by a major label, and nearly a decade since Bleed American proved the genre could be commercially successful. The guys are older now -- frontman Jim Adkins, although immortally baby-faced, is in his mid-thirties -- and the slick, poppy sound that Bleed American helped introduce has been adopted by nearly every emo band since. Most of those new bands are younger than Jimmy Eat World, and Invented marks the point where age officially becomes an issue for the genre forefathers. The problem with Invented isn’t the band’s attempt to sound young. The problem is that these songs consciously reflect Jimmy Eat World’s age, and emo music doesn’t really support that kind of content. Bleed American, Futures, and Chase This Light were all anthemic records, filled with carpe diem platitudes that targeted a teenage audience, but Invented is older, wiser, and perhaps more midtempo than it needs to be. Whereas Chase This Light opened with a rousing rock song, “Big Casino,” whose protagonist becomes “a New Jersey success story” after ditching the small town that raised him, Adkins places himself on the other side of the equation at the beginning of Invented, taking a look at the 21st century kids who’ve come to take away his crown. “I’m more and more replaced by my friends each night/I can’t compete,” he sings, while acoustic guitars and strings bubble beneath him. Melodically, it’s still a gorgeous song, as are most of the ballads and casually paced rock songs on the album. But Invented, as tuneful as it may be, still plays an odd role in Jimmy Eat World’s discography, since it can’t quite figure out how to transcend a genre -- one that Jimmy Eat World helped invent, no less -- that exclusively caters to younger listeners. © Andrew Leahey /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2007 | Interscope

Jimmy Eat World were sitting on top of the emo-pop world before the release of their last album, Futures. Its dark, inward-looking, and more mature-sounding songs didn't wreck their career, but the record didn't exactly further it, either. With Chase This Light, the band returns to the straightforward, hooky, and radio-friendly sound of Bleed American and lightens things up in the lyric department in hopes of recapturing its position in the marketplace. They aren't exactly singing about sunshine and lollipops, mostly love problems and the ills of society, but the cloud of gloom that settled over Futures has lifted. The band is back to following the rough template of Bleed American and the albums that came before it, with a mix of rousing anthems like "Big Casino," "Electable (Give It Up)," and "Feeling Lucky;" melancholy rockers with singalong choruses like "Always Be" and "Chase This Light;" and sweet ballads like "Carry You" and "Dizzy" (which strangely sounds like an outtake from Def Leppard's Hysteria). Only the moody and dark (with strings) "Gotta Be Somebody's Blues" hints at the mature sound of the last album. Chase This Light isn't Futures, Pt. 2, but it also falls short of being another Bleed American. Partially, it's Jimmy Eat World's obvious desire to go back to the sound that made them huge that does them in -- that kind of desperation move is rarely successful and it doesn't work here. Partially, it's the feel of the record. The polished and groomed-to-perfection sound is huge, dry, and airless, the controlled and note-perfect vocals lack passion, and the overall lack of imagination is disheartening. Simply put, it's a bland-sounding record, which is too bad because Jim Adkins really does have a knack for writing good pop songs. With a little more punch or soul, "Carry You" and "Feeling Lucky" could have been special. As they are, all they can manage to be is pleasant. Only the ultra-light and poppy "Here It Goes" manages to stand out, thanks to its goofy handclaps, synthesized voices, and loose backing vocals. A little more willingness to take chances like this would have served the album well, since a combination of slick sounds, surprise-free arrangements, and pleasant tunes on Chase This Light makes Jimmy Eat World the emo version of Bon Jovi -- that's to say, nice to listen to and vaguely uplifting, but ultimately empty on the inside. Jimmy Eat World have proven they can do better than this and they may yet, but this album is a bit of a disappointment. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 17, 2001 | Interscope

3.5 stars out of 5 - "...An album of glorious potential hits...mingling anguish and uplifting melody...which is concisely designed and ardently delivered....sporting the tender turbulence that insular emo kids have enjoyed for ages..." © TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 15, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released July 24, 2001 | Interscope

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2007 | Capitol Records

Booklet
With their third album Clarity being one of the most overlooked masterpieces of 1999, Static Prevails is Jimmy Eat World paying their dues in 1996. It could be the slight over-production (a curse that has always haunted the band), being on a major label for the first time, or them trying to get a feel for pulling fancy studio tricks (i.e., numerous backing vocals, cellos, and Moog additions). Maybe it's all three, but what Static Prevails essentially lacks is the songwriting maturity that Jimmy Eat World could have perfected; but it's almost as if the studio heads at Capitol wouldn't let them so that there would be more room for radio-friendly pop songs. In the end, nobody won. However, tracks such as "Anderson Mesa," "Call It in the Air," and "Seventeen" don't cross that line of boring alternative rock but remain in that aggressive pop status. Nothing close to classic, but definitely a sign of better things to come. © Mike DaRonco /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 24, 2001 | Geffen

After being dropped by Capitol, Jimmy Eat World returned in 2001 with their most consistent and accessible album to date. Recorded entirely on the band's dime before they had a new record deal, Bleed American features compelling lyrics, driving guitar work, and insanely catchy melodies. Left to their own devices during the recording process, it wouldn't have been surprising if the band had turned out another layered, sprawling album akin to their previous full-length masterwork, Clarity. Perhaps sensing that they wouldn't be able to top their previous work when it came to spacy emo, Bleed American heads in a new direction. There are no 16-minute songs here, just straight-ahead rock & roll, performed with punk energy and alt-rock smarts. The title track sets the tone for the album with its blistering guitar attack and aggressive vocals. "A Praise Chorus" and "The Middle improve upon that formula, maintaining the forceful instrumentation but toying with the lyrical themes. "A Praise Chorus" uses the most basic of rock emotions for lyrical inspiration, "I wanna fall in love tonight," while lifting lyrics from Tommy James' "Crimson and Clover," They Might Be Giants' "Don't Let's Start," and Mötley Crüe's "Kick Start My Heart," among others. When used in a song about the comfort and trappings of nostalgia, this borrowing comes off more like a well-placed tribute than stealing. "The Middle" offers a pep talk about self-acceptance and fitting in, and one of the most memorable guitar riffs this side of Angus Young. Bleed American's quieter moments recall some of the band's signature instrumentation from their previous work. Gentle keyboards, bells, and stirring background vocals from former that dog. member Rachel Haden enhance the understated beauty of ballads like "Hear You Me" and "Cautioneers." Haden's most enjoyable contribution, however, is to the up-tempo rocker "The Authority Song." On the surface a song about a song (John Mellencamp's "Authority Song), it also name drops the Beatles' "What Goes On." The numerous references to other bands and other songs reveal that although Jimmy Eat World is a critically acclaimed and incredibly talented band, the members are really just rock fans themselves. If they maintain this level of quality, however, don't be surprised if the next generation of ambitious rockers start writing songs that pay tribute to Jimmy Eat World. © Mark Vanderhoff /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 16, 2007 | Interscope

Jimmy Eat World were sitting on top of the emo-pop world before the release of their last album, Futures. Its dark, inward-looking, and more mature-sounding songs didn't wreck their career, but the record didn't exactly further it, either. With Chase This Light, the band returns to the straightforward, hooky, and radio-friendly sound of Bleed American and lightens things up in the lyric department in hopes of recapturing its position in the marketplace. They aren't exactly singing about sunshine and lollipops, mostly love problems and the ills of society, but the cloud of gloom that settled over Futures has lifted. The band is back to following the rough template of Bleed American and the albums that came before it, with a mix of rousing anthems like "Big Casino," "Electable (Give It Up)," and "Feeling Lucky;" melancholy rockers with singalong choruses like "Always Be" and "Chase This Light;" and sweet ballads like "Carry You" and "Dizzy" (which strangely sounds like an outtake from Def Leppard's Hysteria). Only the moody and dark (with strings) "Gotta Be Somebody's Blues" hints at the mature sound of the last album. Chase This Light isn't Futures, Pt. 2, but it also falls short of being another Bleed American. Partially, it's Jimmy Eat World's obvious desire to go back to the sound that made them huge that does them in -- that kind of desperation move is rarely successful and it doesn't work here. Partially, it's the feel of the record. The polished and groomed-to-perfection sound is huge, dry, and airless, the controlled and note-perfect vocals lack passion, and the overall lack of imagination is disheartening. Simply put, it's a bland-sounding record, which is too bad because Jim Adkins really does have a knack for writing good pop songs. With a little more punch or soul, "Carry You" and "Feeling Lucky" could have been special. As they are, all they can manage to be is pleasant. Only the ultra-light and poppy "Here It Goes" manages to stand out, thanks to its goofy handclaps, synthesized voices, and loose backing vocals. A little more willingness to take chances like this would have served the album well, since a combination of slick sounds, surprise-free arrangements, and pleasant tunes on Chase This Light makes Jimmy Eat World the emo version of Bon Jovi -- that's to say, nice to listen to and vaguely uplifting, but ultimately empty on the inside. Jimmy Eat World have proven they can do better than this and they may yet, but this album is a bit of a disappointment. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2005 | Interscope

Of the five tracks on Jimmy Eat World's 2005 EP Stay on My Side Tonight, three are songs the band worked on during the recording of Futures but decided didn't work on that record. It is hard to see why they were left off, as they are as good as -- if not better than -- some of the more pedestrian material that did make the cut. Maybe it is the slightly less polished sound, and maybe it is the fact that they aren't surrounded by 50 minutes of similar-sounding songs, but the three songs have more life and power than one might expect. "Disintegration" is an epic dirge that builds impressively and ends with the chanted vocals that give the EP its name; "Closer" is a hooky, lightweight pop tune that harks back to the mood of Bleed American; and "Over," while slightly less impressive than the other two, is a decent emo ballad. The other two tracks are interesting but not vital. They gamely cover Heatmiser's "Half Right" but can't quite find the magic that Elliott Smith was so effortlessly able to conjure up. The Styrofoam remix of Futures' "Drugs or Me" is OK, with the vocals glitched into near oblivion and the tune bouncing along on a bouncy, broken beat. So there's nothing earthshaking, but fans will want to grab it, and those who were put off by the slick surface of Futures might take some solace in the slightly stripped-down sound -- and hope that Jimmy Eat World continue to shed their studio sheen by the time the next album is recorded. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 1, 2020 | RCA Records Label

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Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 2004 | Interscope

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 22, 2016 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released September 14, 2004 | Interscope

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 31, 2016 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released January 1, 2005 | Interscope